6 clever ways to eat yoghurt (the most slimming food on the planet!?)

Posted on June 28th, 2011

Another week, another “study” that shows we’re meant to be eating this instead of that. Yeah, I tire of them. But I found this one on the best and worst foods for healthy weight quite interesting.

It found yoghurt was the best food to eat to lose weight.

Below I’ve outlined the gist of the study, and then shared my favourite ways to eat yoghurt.

via pinterest.com

 

The study was based on three trials over 20 years. It found

  • The quality of food matters more than calorie count!!! So eating organic makes you lose weight.
  • The top five most fattening foods were sugar-sweetened beverages, red meat and processed red meat, each associated with half a kilo of weight gain every four years.
  • The most fattening food of them all? Potato chips, which led to more weight gain per serving than any other food, the study found.
  • The best nosh for your waistline? Surprisingly, yogurt — each extra daily serving prevented half a kilo of weight gain

These studies always involved competing, intertwined factors. But there’s no escaping that eating yoghurt leads to good things.

So, some yoghurt sharing…

What yoghurt do I eat?

I swap between Meredith Farm Sheep’s Milk and the Baramba Organic (full-fat) Cow’s Milk one (this stuff is soooo decadently good). Not to be pious, per se. But because they have the best flavour and consistency. IMO.

Full-fat or low-fat?

I can not say this strongly enough – full-fat only! Three reasons: it tastes better (so you’ll be satiated and eat less of it); when fat is removed from dairy the particular enzymes contained in dairy that help you metabolise milk and milk fats are disrupted (thus you don’t process it as well…meaning, I’ve heard it argued, it winds up more fattening); low-fat dairy is often pumped with sugar. You can read more about that here.

How do I eat it?

I eat yoghurt every day. I mix it up. Feel free to try these ideas…

* A quick dessert snack: Pan-toasted walnuts or pepitas, cinnamon and a teaspoon of Miessence Berry Radical powder (this is a sugar-free chocolate powder) mushed through a big bowl of yoghurt. Just like a chocolate milkshake only crunchy.

* Another quick dessert: I mush frozen berries in a cup of yoghurt. Sometimes I add pure vanilla essence.

* A breakfast smoothie: check my recipes here and here. I often make these when I’m at the end of the container – I stickblend in the container, whack the lid on, put in the freezer for 15 minutes (to get well-chilled) and voila – a portable breakfast. Perfect when I have to head to the airport early, or to a job across town.

* A breakfast idea: I heat left-over polenta and wallop on a dallop of yoghurt with some pesto. And presto! Sometimes I swirl in some flaxseed oil into the yoghurt (I don’t put flaxseed directly onto hot stuff…)

* Another breakfast idea: make grainless pancakes using just eggs and yoghurt and some LSA.

* A Morrocon flavour hit: I blend preserved lemon (mushed up), cumin and yoghurt and add to a lamb dish or to a beetroot and lentil salad.

* Soup savior: I can’t eat soup without a big swirl of yoghurt. It sweetens any flavour.

OK. That’s enough. Over to you… any clever suggestions?

 

 

 

 

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  • MaryV

    I get what you are saying about full fat only but what about people with a cholesterol probelm? I eat low fat yoghurt, no added sugar, becasue of my cholesterol. I am on statins but hope to bring down my levels so that I no longer need the drugs.

    [Reply]

    Andrew Reply:

    This is a difficult area to confront, especially for people with high cholesterol, from which I also suffer. I know that on low fat diets I have been able to reduce my cholesterol considerably, although triglycerides remain high. But I have also heard recent studies that suggest that natural dairy fats help the body process other fats, and can help reduce cholesterol. However, with most things it is very hard to determine what to believe. I would suggest that after your next blood test, you introduce some full fat yoghurt or milk into your diet at a moderate level and see how it affects your blood tests in a month’s time. I don’t think there is any better way of working out what is best for you.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Thanks Andrew, I’m afraid I don’t have a watertight answer. But I am hearing similar stuff…also that it’s sugar that is causing the issues with cholesterol. The fats not being the problem, but the hardening of the artery walls…which is caused by sugar.
    I think in the next few years we’ll slowly learn more about this…

    [Reply]

    Kitsa Reply:

    Hi Sarah,

    You might like to take a look at ‘Put your heart in your mouth” by Dr Natasha Campbell McBride which clearly debunks the cholesterol myth – as we get older our bodies create more cholesterol to keep us healthy – our brain especially needs cholesterol otherwise we end up with dementia and the like.

    One of the main causes of Multiple Sclerosis is now thought to be too low cholesterol – so enjoy cholesterol rich foods like caviar,egg yolks, real butter, cold water fish, shellfish, lard & other animal fats as well as cod liver oil. Good fats don’t make us fat but we need to be able to digest them so eating cultured vegetables with your meals helps greatly or taking digestive enzymes or Betaine to increase stomach acid.
    Those with AI can eat moderate amounts of sauerkraut for its gut healing benefits as long as iodine levels are adequate – best to take Lugol’s iodine as a skin application, alternatively just culture other vegetables apart from the cruciferous ones.

    There is a great conference in Sydney this August 13 & 14 held by the MINDD (Metabolic immunologic neurologic digestive disorders) Foundation which I encourage all to attend – whether you are healing from any autoimmune condition or have children on the autism spectrum or are just interested in learning ways to maintain your health as you age. All the latest cutting edge research will be provided by health specialists from overseas and locally – the latest diets being used to heal gut issues and create healthy inner ecosystems which are the basis of good health will be discussed such as The GAPS DIET ( Gut & Psychology Syndrome by Dr Natasha Campbell McBride), The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, Low Oxalate Diet and FODMAPs for fructose malarbsorption.

    Sorry about the long post but it has taken me personally such a longtime of searching for answers for my own health issues and that of my family that I’d like to offer you all a shortcut!
    Kitsa
    GAPS Nutrition Consultant
    Kitsas’s Kitchen organic raw cultured vegetables

  • http://foodiefresh.com Kelly @foodiefresh

    I wrote a post for Chobani Greek yogurt about using yogurt as a condiment. http://chobani.com/blog/?p=2353 — I put it on anything and everything! Your ideas are great!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.viendamaria.com Vienda

    I love the pancakes idea! I never thought of that, I’m going to try it with organic ground linseed meal and cinnamon. Do you put anything on the pancakes? Marmalade or honey wouldn’t be an option due to the sugar content …..

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Berries and more yoghurt!

    [Reply]

  • bec

    I used to only be able to eat greek yoghurt loaded with honey because it was just too tart for my liking.

    But now I’ve started eating five:am brand of organic greek yoghurt, and because it’s so ridiculously creamy no added sweetness is necessary.

    I eat it with breakfast on muesli or on it’s own as a snack (sometimes with blueberries), and all the protein and fat makes it incredibly satiating that I don’t find myself overeating later in the day.

    [Reply]

    viola Reply:

    Yes, totally agree with you on the five:am yoghurt, it’s so good. My children are weaned off all the sweet kinds and only eat this now. I keep a tub at work too and have a couple of spoonfuls in the afternoon to help curb my snack attack when I get home!

    [Reply]

    Christa Reply:

    I was not a yoghurt eater, I knew about the benefits, but just didn’t like the taste.
    I tried Five: AM organic natural yoghurt and am hooked, the taste is unbelievable, so creamy and moreish. I throw some walnuts on for crunch. Happy you, happy earth and happy cows. Bliss!

    [Reply]

    Brooke Reply:

    I was just about to write about Five: AM yoghurt. I am a yoghurt addict and have tried them all. I tried Five: Am Greek Style last week for the first time and it was perfect, no added sugar or nasties to make it creamier. You can definitely tell it comes from happy cows!

    Lauren Reply:

    The Five:AM Natural yoghurt has sugar in it! Your not supposed to call it natural if it has added sugar. The Greek version is lovely though.

    jan Reply:

    Where do you get Five:AM? I eat Chris’s Greek Yogurt but it is a bit tart and I drizzle a very small amount of honey, so would love to know where you can get this one – I live in Brisbane

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Will look out for that brand!

    [Reply]

    Lydia Reply:

    Check out this link from Emma Sterlings blog. Great video about the 5am dairy. Gorgeous glossy cows!

    [Reply]

    Lydia Reply:

    oops, forgot the link
    http://www.scoopnutrition.com/2011/05/wake-up-and-smell-the-yogurt-new-fiveam-organic-range/

    [Reply]

    Mel Reply:

    I tried 5 am on my search for the perfect natural yogurt but it just didnt do it for me. Funny aftertaste that isn’t crisp and clean. I guess I just like the tartness of Greek style yogurt.

  • Mia

    You can use it as a marinade. Dollop of yoghurt in a bowl, whatever spices you like (garlic, chili, cumin, paprika – go nuts) and chicken. Leave for an hour or overnight if you have time. Cook, and it’s the absolute tenderest chicken you will ever eat!

    Also, berries + macadamias + yoghurt = best breakfest ever.

    [Reply]

  • Diana

    I’m a huge fan of the Meredith sheep yoghurt too! A quick and easy accompaniment for chicken, fish, vegies – anything really – yoghurt, tahini, lemon juice, cumin mixed up into a paste. Also, as a post gym snack – yoghurt with frozen berries, raw cacao powder, seeds, nuts, coconut etc – tasty, healthy and quick!

    [Reply]

  • Lexi

    At the moment I’m love Jalna’s Biodynamic Whole Milk Organic Yogurt which has the 2nd lowest sugar content of their range (4.1g per100g) 2nd only to the natural whole milk (at 3.4g per 100g). No added sucrose, doesn’t list any sugars, acidophilus, bifidus and casei probiotics, reduced lactose, gluten and wheat free…my father’s currently loving five:am with a slightly higher sugar content (9.4g per 100g) from raw sugar in the natural and (6.4 per 100g) in the Greek style, no added sugar. I quite like five:am’s philosophy/commitment, seems like a good way to eat yogurt, and I think I might try Meredith Farm’s sheep milk yogurt at some point.

    My morning smoothie is 3 big dollops of natural/unsweetened/whole milk yogurt, 2 big spoonfuls of frozen berries, LSA, Chia seeds, unsweetened cocoa powder, ground ginger, cinnamon and nutmeg and whole milk. I don’t even think about food again until 3-4pm.

    I love greek yogurt mixed with diced cucumber, cumin, garlic and lemon as a side dish with curries, stews, meat, fish etc.

    Yogurt with berries or banana smashed in with the stick mixer.

    Yogurt mixed into curries, sauces and stews rather than cream etc.

    Yogurt with seeds or cereals rather than milk.

    [Reply]

    Kylie Ryan Reply:

    I’m not the only one that makes that smoothie? Hooray! Yum.

    [Reply]

  • Mel

    I love jalna Greek full fat yogurt. I’ve tried all the others and it really has the best tartness and thickness. I really don’t like the boring taste of the other natural yogurts and their consistency just doesn’t seem right. It needs that tang. My two year old daughter also loves it with plain blueberries, no sweetener needed. I hate those diet yogurts, I’m gagging just thinking of them. No wonder diets don’t work!!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.aliveandwell.co Nichola

    Have you tried CoYo? We have just discovered it via our local organic co-op. It is yoghurt made from coconut milk. Great for those with dairy issues. I only use the plain one (not those with added fruit). It’s made in Australia and so very delicious. Nxo

    [Reply]

    Mel Reply:

    Oh that sounds fantastic. I love coconut oil, milk etc. I’ll have to hunt that down. Any stockists in randwick area?

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Mel – you can get it at About Life in Bondi Junction. That is the closest to Randwick I know of. But try to go in on a Tuesday or Thursday when they receive stock as they sell out pretty quickly.

    [Reply]

    Lee Reply:

    They have it in Maloney’s in Coogee

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Does it have added sugar…? I know one of them does?

    [Reply]

    Nichola Reply:

    yes, xylitol. how bad is that?

    we made a batch of coconut milk yoghurt at home this week without any added sugar and it was good. it is the milk protein casein that my son doesn’t tolerate (as opposed to the lactose), so dairy-free is important for us.

    [Reply]

    Kitsa Reply:

    Here’s a recipe for making your own coconut yoghurt from the meat of the young coconut so extra nutritious!

    2 cups of the meat from young Thai coconuts or the ones from Mission Beach QLD
    1/2 cup coconut water plus a bit extra if needed to thin the consistency
    1 organic vanilla bean (Loving Earth sell these)
    1/4 tsp acidophilus powder or any other probiotic blend should work

    Blend young coconut meat, insides of scraped vanilla bean and coconut water until smooth adding additional coconut water if mix is too thick
    Add probiotic powder and blend again
    Place the mix in a mason jar and wrap with a tea towel to block out light and leave at room temperature for about 12 hours
    Once fermentation is complete you can blend fresh or dried fruit or sweetener of choice, activated nuts, seeds, coconut flakes etc for variety
    Should keep in the fridge for about a week.

    Kitsa

    [Reply]

  • LuLu

    Does anyone know of any good lactose-free yoghurts. Most soy yoghurts taste horrible and are loaded with heaps of sugar.

    I love yoghurt but am no longer able to have diary.

    [Reply]

    Nichola Reply:

    Try the CoYo (made from coconut milk) that I commented on a moment ago. It is delicious and good for you too!

    [Reply]

    Lara Reply:

    I’m not saying that this is the case for you (because I don’t know what your particular lactose issue is), but many people who are lactose intolerant can tolerate yoghurt. This is because the bacteria in yoghurt feeds on the sugar (lactose) found in milk. So the older the yoghurt is, the less lactose it contains because the bacteria has consumed it.

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    Have you tried Kefir? I have never actually made it myself but I have heard fantastic things from my non-dairy friends. Apparently its really easy and you can make it out of coconut milk and other non-dairy things.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    PS…coconut is great for thyroid sufferers….in all it’s forms

    [Reply]

    LuLu Reply:

    Thanks! I will certainly give CoYo a try.

    [Reply]

  • http://oneaprilmorning.net Laura

    Any tips for someone who can’t stand the taste of yoghurt?

    I really want to like it, and I’ve tried many times, but it makes me gag. Any extra special recipes that might convert my taste buds?

    [Reply]

  • Lara

    I make yoghurt in my slow cooker. It’s yum and the easiest thing ever! Heat 2 litres of unhomongenised organic milk (or any milk you like, including non-dairy milks) in the slow cooker for 2 1/2 hrs on low. Turn the heat off and let it sit for 3 hours. Then take out a cup or two of milk and whisk together with 1/2C to a cup of whatever yoghurt you like (I used Jalna biodynamic the first time), which puts the bacteria into the milk. Then add the yoghurt-infused milk back into the slowcooker, give the whole lot a stir to incorporate and then wrap the whole slowcooker up in a couple of beach towels and let it sit overnight (at least 8 hours) so the bacteria can multiply. When you unwrap it you’ll have yoghurt! I can’t quite explain the pride I experience every time I do this! Store it in the fridge and reserve 1/2C to make your next batch.

    Note: It’s runnier than store bought yoghurt, but it’s perfect for smoothies. The longer it sits in the fridge, the thicker it gets. I’ve found that cows milk yoghurt thickens better than goats milk and I haven’t personally tried non-dairy milks but I know they can be used. You will find that a liquid will accumulate on the top (it can have a yellowy colour), don’t discard this! It’s the whey and it is highly nutritious. Also, I’ve theoretically stuffed it up loads of times (eg. let it heat too long, let it heat then turned it off and forgotten about it completely till the next day and started the process all over again etc) and it still always works.

    [Reply]

    Claire Reply:

    I was just going to write my yoghurt making recipe. I do the same thing but just simmer the milk on the stove – then turn it off and about 15 minutes later it has cooled down enough. I stir in Jalna or often leftover yoghurt from the previous batch of yoghurt I’ve made.

    I wrap it in a hand towel and leave it in the kitchen cupboard near the hot water tank! By the morning it is perfect. And yes, runnier, but if you wanted to thicken it you can pop in the fridge before work, come home and then strain out the whey in the yoghurt through a cheesecloth and sieve and it thickens up. But agree, whey is the good stuff!

    I feel the same thing – total pride! I grew up eating homemade yoghurt so I always feel guilty buying it when I can make 2 litres for a couple of dollars.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Claire and Lara, these are seriously helpful!

    [Reply]

  • vic

    Love the yoghurt slow cooker idea. Will give it a try.

    Re the lactose intolerant and yoghurt – I wouldn’t want anyone to try it and suffer so do some research for yourself but the enzyme in yoghurt is actually supposed to aid in lactose intolerance, especially live yoghurt. I think it’s a very common minconception that lactose intolerant people can’t eat yoghurt. Yoghurt has very little lactose in it and is a good way of getting calcium.

    [Reply]

  • Ellie

    Sarah, as usual a lovely and interesting post. I wish I had your kitchen inspiration, you seem to eat so well!

    On a no so positive note, since your mea cuple post on referencing photos, I have noticed a lot of your references are “via pinterest.com”, which does NOT reference the source or give credit where it’s due. If you don’t know the source, don’t use it. You wouldn’t want people using your words with a reference “via some blog” or similar. That said, I do love the pics you use, please just make that little extra effort to choose ones you can source.

    [Reply]

  • Queenie

    Can I just do a little plug for my neighbours who run the best biodynamic dairy farm on the planet, and make the best unhomogenised pot set yoghurt on the planet out of it. Marrook Farm, if you see it, buy it, it’s hard to get (alhough I know Piedemonte’s in North Fitzroy in Melbourne stock it), because David and Heidi won’t compromise their values and go big. I’m lucky enough to live nearby, and I can vouch for the boidynamic-ism of the farm and the health of the cows, and I do my best to promote it because they don’t really have the time – they’re too busy making the youghurt.
    And thanks for this post – I’ll go eat some now!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Go ahead!!

    [Reply]

    Lizard Reply:

    I love Marrook Farm yoghurt – so delicious and creamy!
    I’ll never go back to commercial supermarket brands and when I the “diet” yoghurts in the fridge at work it makes me cringe. Please tell your neighbours they are doing a great job and I can’t get enough of their yoghurt ;)

    [Reply]

  • Collette

    I love natural yogurt and through experimenting with it found a great alternative to ice-cream. Mash up some ripe bananas (if you’re lucky enough to be able to afford them at the moment). Mix with natural, full fat yougurt and frozen (or fresh berries). Freeze, eat from frozen, as you would any other ice-cream – great alternative if you are sugar-free. Even my 2 and 4 year old love it!

    [Reply]

  • Libby

    Hey!
    Thank you for this post :)

    I just wondered guys is flavoured yoghurt ok?
    Just wondered if for example a ‘Wild Berry’ yoghurt takes away the benefits by adding sugar?

    Thank you !

    x

    [Reply]

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  • Sarah

    my FAV yoghurt snack is natural non-sweetened yoghurt, mixed with grated apple, cinnamon and a tablespoon LSA mix.

    ITS AMAZING! I call it “Apple pie yoghurt”. It feels like a treat but it’s so healthy. i eat it nearly every day :-)

    [Reply]

  • Ross H

    I find that regular eating of yoghurt is good for Crohn’s Disease, soothing things I guess. And I simply like it.

    As for eating tips, being an aging crabby bachelor, I often just spoon it straight out of the tub as part of my breakfast. Or have some with some fresh fruit sliced into it.

    [Reply]

  • http://ewheretobuyakindle.com/ jan

    There have been a few studies now done on dieting and dairy intake and they have found that those who have 3 serves a day lose more weight and lose fat rather than muscle. None of them know how it works, but suggest that maybe it is something to do with the calcium. I myself think it has a lot to do with satiety and because you feel full you don’t want to eat so much.

    After being on diets for many years and low fat for the past few years, I have seen my cholesterol go up and up. So I have stopped eating low fat, my weight has completely stabilised, my skin is not dry all the time, I rarely think about food unless it’s time to prepare it and I can’t wait to go for my cholesterol test in August to see what is happening inside! I’m leaning more towards Krista’s thinking about cholesterol, eat good quality cholesterol foods such as eggs, coconut oil, butter. Your body makes cholesterol because it is so important in our bodies for cell wall strength and many other functions and if we don’t eat it in good quality foods, our body makes it anyway!

    There is a wealth of information at The Weston A Price Foundation site at http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats if you want to see an alternative view to the low fat thinking.

    [Reply]

  • Merelyn

    I eat yoghurt with GF seed sprinkle almost every morning. YUM. Incredible stuff! Recently a friend loaned me her Proghurt yoghurt machine. It’s like that EasyYo stuff but with best quality pre and pro biotics. I made the yoghurt with A2 milk and it was delicious (though a bit runny). I haven’t invested in my own machine yet because the starter sachets are pretty expensive…but the time will come. BTW, If you like Barambah, try Mungalli yoghurt from the Atherton. Insanely good. BTW2, The French eats masses of yoghurt and I’d be happy to look like those women!

    [Reply]

  • http://natthepagodatreecomau.blogspot.com/ Nat K

    loving the 5am yoghurt right now.

    Over the winter months I’m trying to stick to warmer foods as we know that our gut best digests at 37 degrees and above.
    I’ve been stewing fruit and having it with yoghurt for this reason – and when I say fruit, I mean anything and everything. My favourite is warm prunes (although not stewed fully but warmed well) with yoghurt with a sprinkling of chopped almonds. Otherwise apples do it for me – add a little orange zest and it is awesome!

    [Reply]

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  • Emily

    Hi there! I love your idea of grainless pancakes, and I was wondering if you could tell me the actual recipe for it. I want to try it, but I don’t know how much of everything to use. Thanks again for the great idea!

    [Reply]

    Merelyn Reply:

    I whisk two eggs, then whisk in 1 heaped tablespoon of rice bran or flaxseed. Pour into a hot frypan smeared with olive oil and it forms a pancake like thingimibob! It’s like a cross between a pancake and an omelette.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.divaopinion.wordpress.com Tarryne

    I mix a spoon full of organic, no sugar added coco, to full fat organic yoghurt. Instant chocolate pudding. Divine!

    [Reply]

  • Kelly

    Mix yoghurt with chia seeds and cinnamon, leave in the fridge overnight. Add chopped almonds for a delicious breakfast pudding. (it goes kind of like rice pudding) Original recipe is from Chef Kate on the Kora blog. She uses coconut milk and other flavourings for some yummy puddings.

    [Reply]

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  • Andy

    I have a question off topic if anyone can help. I’ve successfully given up sugar for a couple of months now and doing great, but have just added some berries back into my diet, no other fruit really. But on the weekend I tried some organic sundried dates and they were heavenly.. I understand dates are quite high in sugar, so would it be best to leave them alone, or is it okay to eat them?

    [Reply]

  • http://runwayrevolution.com Pippa

    Labne (a spreadable cheese, Lebanese food) is made from plain yoghurt that has been hung in a cheesecloth overnight and allowed to drain off the excess liquid. It has a creamy, slightly tart flavour. Green Dairy make a good one.

    I usually eat it straight up, or mixed with some chopped herbs or a bit of pesto, scooped with celery and carrots or other veggies. I also swap it for cream cheese in certain savoury recipes. Delicious and not so breakfasty!

    [Reply]

  • jessica

    All that REALLY matters in the end ARE the calories! It’s basic science calories are energy. The role that quality plays is how full you will feel. If you eat simple sugars like lucky charms for breakfast you will be hungry much sooner because these are digested more quickly. Protein empties from the stomach more slowly (as does fat) and makes you feel full longer. Therefore you will likely consume LESS CALORIES and lose weight.

    PS Lactose is a sugar. As are all carbohydrates. So I assume when you say you gave up sugar you mean common table sugar sucrose and also fructose? You would be dead if you gave up sugar- our bodies need glucose for energy. Lactose is converted into glucose (:O) and galactose. Fructose is converted into glucose in the small intestine as well. They both end up the same in the body.

    [Reply]

    Lauren Reply:

    Find the post on “calories in vs calories out is bullshit”. Old thinking Jessica, so many studies have been done since then and proven old things like calories in vs out to be untrue.

    [Reply]

  • Ebony

    I absolutely love yoghurt! It is without a doubt one of my favourite foods… It goes well with so many things, and it fills me up! I haven’t eaten yoghurt for about 3 weeks now, though, as I’ve read things here and there, and been advised by a dermatologist, that dairy is not great for acne. I’ve suffered from cheek acne for about a year and a half, and it’s driving me nuts! I eat a pretty healthy diet (although weekends are a weak point …), and only drink water and green tea. So out of desperation, I’ve strayed from dairy (as best as I can). I haven’t noticed a great deal of improvement, so should I be depriving myself of this wonderful healthy food that I love so dearly? Is it really that bad for acne? I was just wondering whether you/anyone may have any further recommendations? Or information on this topic?
    And Thanks for your insightful posts! They’re so fantastic!

    [Reply]

  • Helen

    for all the people who like coconut yoghurt – not sure if you’ve tried the probiotic coconut product “nata de coco” ? It’s used on philippino desserts such as halo halo. It is very sewwt! You can buy nata de coco at asian grocery stores (about $1.50 a jar).

    Helen

    [Reply]

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  • Jackie

    In the US it’s hard to find whole yoghurt on the shelves, I’m not kidding. Whole Foods Supermarket is about the only place to find organic whole yoghurt. At any rate, maybe this talk about “good whole fats” will finally bring it to the shelves here in abundance! Sarah, is there an equivalent in the US to the miessence Radical Berry Powder that you know of?

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    My dads a doctor and he has found that his patients with high cholesterol drinking organic full fat milk have actually benefited from these fats resulting in lower cholesterol. Here in NZ they buy whats called ‘Dolly’s milk’, give it a search.

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