Question: how do you travel and not fall apart, health-wise

Posted on August 16th, 2011

Every now and then I answer a question that crops up a lot from you lot. This week: how do I travel so much and not fall apart at the seams?

I do travel a lot. I fly from Byron Bay to Sydney or Melbourne every week or so. Sometimes it’s a day trip. Sometimes I have to stay a few nights and I stay in air-conditioned hotels and friends spare rooms that aren’t always ventilated etc as I like. It’s really very disruptive to my health. And I DO fall apart at the seams a bit.

Don’t know about you but travel also grinds my digestive system to a halt. I don’t go to the loo. Plus, I get puffy and lethargic. And tired. Plane travel is so bad for us. Ditto air-con (which is everywhere when you travel). It’s hard to eat well on the road and we have odd timetables and sleep patterns.

And so I’ve had to learn ways to make it work for me. It’s taken some trial and error, but I have a flow now. Of sorts.

My key advice is to create routine. As much as possible.

To replicate what you do at home, on the road, as much as possible.

And lesson the toxic load at all turns.

So a list of the routines and toxic-reduction tricks that work for me:

In hotels:

* You’re going to think I’m bonkers: As soon as I arrive I go around and turn off all powerpoints in the room. All of them, including the one to the fridge. The EMF load in hotel rooms is crazy – fridges, phones, alarm clocks, internet…plus the load from surrounding rooms etc. I do what I can… (and am sure to turn them all back on when I leave…. although I do feel bad I stuff the clock radios).

* I request a room away from the lift well and away from the power room. Again to lessen the EMF load.

* I wear earplugs and an eyemask. Again, bonkers? Nah.  It’s all about minimising interruptions and stimulus wherever you can.

* I go to bed early, as much as I enjoy sitting in bed watching news channels to all hours.

Exercise:

Exercise is key. You really have to make sure you get your lymphatic system moving – to flush toxins and to help facilitate routine (bowel and otherwise).

* If there’s no gym and/or I arrive late at night: I run up and down the firestairs in the hotel. I know it seems mad. But you do what you have to do. I came across others doing the same after arriving in HongKong when we filmed MasterChef. We laughed as we passed each other. Just make sure you remember what floor you entered from and that the firedoors allow you back out.

* Where there’s a gym, there’s a way. I always use the gym in the morning and do my Origin of Energy workout for 20-30 minutes. Weights are great when travelling – they don’t drain my energy as much as cardio but get the joints moving. If possible, I take the weights out into an outdoor area – I get fresh air wherever I can.

* Make use of the sauna/steamroom. I always take togs with me. Or wlll enter in my undies and sports bra if I have to. Steam is sooooo good for clearing your lymphs and getting gunk out of your system.

* I walk as often as possible. Cosmopolitan magazine founder Helen Gurley Brown once told me her #1 tip in life was to never stop walking in New York. That is, to head in the direction you need to go and move with the green lights, zig-zagging your way along, never stopping. I find this is such a great way to move when you’re staying in any city. Walk. Don’t cab. It’s mostly faster and it avoids further stressors.

On planes:

* I wear pressure socks. My life is so much nicer when I do. Even if I look daft.

* I drink a lot of water. I take my own.

* I travel mostly with carry-on only. And wear flat shoes. I move smoothly.

* I pack my own meals and/or eat nuts from the Australiana stores ( so I don’t revert to sugary or trans-fatty foods).

* I meditate on planes during take-off and landing (basically, when the hosties aren’t talking on the speaker or bustling past with the food trolley).

* For more info on travelling efficiently see my post here.

Food:

* I take an arsenal of bowel stuff with me. I KNOW I’ll suffer so I ensure I’m equipped. See my post on stomach aids here. Vital Greens do travel sachets, which are great. I also take small sachets of chia seeds (and add to my breakfast…whatever it is). Mintec is great, too, for stomach aches.

* At the breakfast buffet I go poached eggs and bacon and mushrooms. I don’t touch the yoghurts and sauces and sweet things because they are sooooo sugary and sooooo gooby and sooooo full of additives. Choose food that is one ingredient only.

* I eat at pubs or places where I can order a bowl of steamed greens with whatever I’m eating.

* If I’ve eaten crap all day, I simply order the soup and/or a bowl of steamed greens in my hotel. Operation Get Nutrients.

* I avoid booze. Combined with air-con and plane travel, it makes me so puffy and mostly I’m traveling to do a job that requires me to look and play sharp.

* I go for Greek food or pub food (steak or fish and vegetables of some sort), or Italian (but go for the clean, simple stuff). I avoid Thai or heavy, saucy food (full of sugar and goob).

So, this is what I pack:

Many of the below I keep in my toiletries bag and case at all times, ready to go:

* chia seeds sachets

* Vital Greens sachets

* lavender oil – for better sleep and to put, topically, on spots (which I always get when travelling)

* melatonin, especially good for international flights. I take one when it’s 10pm in the destination city and it kicks jet-lag to the curb.

* Echinacea drops (as soon as I feel ringing ears and watery eyes, I douse myself in this stuff, straight under the tongue)

* soluble aspirin (for bringing down plane swell; on long flights I take two as we take off…not ideal, but for thyroidy types, it’s a salve)

* pressure socks

* earrplugs and eyemask

* camomile teabags

What thoroughly ingenious tricks and tips do you have/follow?

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  • Sara

    I travel a lot for work and it’s usually taxi-plane-office-hotel-taxi-plane and it really does takes its toll after a while (esp the different air temps). So thanks for some great insight/tips Sarah. I look forward to adopting what I can.

    [Reply]

  • Lou

    Great tips Sarah! looking forward to adopting some, thanks :O)

    [Reply]

  • http://svasti.wordpress.com/ Svasti

    Coconut water is crazy-good for hydration. It’s also nourishing for our bodily tissues and as such, it’s something I now drink every day. Regardless of the fact that it’s considered trendy, it’s actually one of the best products out. Nudie’s coconut water is the best.

    If you’ve ever learned sun salutations in yoga, then you have both your in-room exercise and digestive aid in one. Do as many sun salutes as you can manage, and you’ll work up a sweat and also kick-start your bowels. Seriously. Plus, any niggles you have from sitting in an aeroplane will be balanced out.

    [Reply]

  • Fiona

    Hi Sarah,
    Do you have a melatonin brand you can recommend?
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    a tricky one cos it’s not legally allowed in Australia. I buy it when I’m in the US (or get friends to brings some over)…the Vitamin Shoppe brand is fine.

    [Reply]

    Alison Reply:

    You can get it now with a prescription from compounding pharmacies. Stenlakes at Bondi junction do it.

    [Reply]

  • Mia

    I like probiotics, the Faulding brand and several others you dont even need to refrigerate so you can carry them in your luggage. A little mineral salt in your water can help absorption. Also, I like to do a forward bending yoga pose followed by a backward bending one, and alternate for a bit, to flush everything completely. Downward facing dog is nice to get bloodflow back to your brain again. :)

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    P.s. Any tips you have for insomnia, Sarah, would be awesome too! Speaking of reader questions. Although the above would probably translate, jetlag not being too dissimilar…

    [Reply]

  • Jessica Rabbit

    Hi Sarah,
    Can i please ask what brand of lavender oil you buy?
    I buy one from Coles and it doesn’t feel like an oil. I use it to take my make-up off and its better than any cleanser i’ve ever used but, i just wasn’t sure if it was suppose to have an oily texture or if it should just have the consistency of water.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    hmmmm, mine isn’t partic oily. I use Thursday Plantation from the chemist – cheap. basic.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.deliriouslydeep.com Susana

    Wow!! I haven’t got to experience life as a traveller, but if + when I do, I know I’m better equipped. Here’s to looking crazy + taking self care to a whole new level ;-) thanks for sharing! x

    [Reply]

  • http://Www.commongroundaustralia.com Kirra

    Great stuff Sarah! Thanks for this as a regular business traveller I always return home bloated and lethargic…some great tips that I will try especially the sachets of chia and greens..oh and of course the stairs! My thighs and ass will thank you for that one!!!

    [Reply]

  • http://Www.commongroundaustralia.com Kirra

    Great stuff Sarah! Thanks for this as a regular business traveller I always return home bloated and lethargic…some great tips that I will try especially the sachets of chia and greens..oh and of course the stairs! My thighs and ass will thank you for that one!!!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    send your ass my love!

    [Reply]

  • Kathie Rytenskild

    Bacon???? Full of sodium-nitrate, and you don’t know where the pigs have been or what they’ve been eating? Bacon is one thing I avoid everywhere.

    Do you drink a special type of water? Specially filtered? If so, what do you do when you’re travelling overseas and you’re not allowed to take your own water on the plane?

    Very interesting thank you.

    [Reply]

  • Triz

    Thanks for sharing all your tips Sarah. I’m in Sydney next week for work and will be staying in an apartment. I’ll definitely be switching off all the appliances and powerpoints and I don’t think you are bonkers for doing it :-) To the contrary.

    I’ve recently been diagnosed with Hashimotos. It’s such a relief to read your blog and understand why I feel the way that I do so thanks heaps for sharing what you have learnt on your journey and paving the way for mine.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    EMFs are a big drain on AI sufferers. …and my pleasure!

    [Reply]

  • http://dinnerintenminutes.com Jan Littlehales

    I don’t travel for work, but when I travel for holidays I do many of the things you mentioned. Thanks for the extra tips. After all, when you go on holiday you want to come back feeling great – and your tips and tricks will definitely help.

    [Reply]

  • Stephanie

    This is a wonderful piece! I wish I could offer some useful tips but I always make the same mistakes when I travel and can benefit from your tips! As usual! I fly transatlantically mostly and cope with it by wearing loose clothing, flat shoes, keeping my luggage minimal (as in I pack once and then take half of it out again – I never travel with more than a small knapsack, a purse and a duffel bag), and carrying earplugs and an eye mask! Oh and my kindle. I absolutely need reading material on a plane to protect me from chatty neighbours. Re. eating on planes: I don’t. One thing I read a while back about adapting to jet lag on long journeys is that waiting 16 hours to eat can help to reset the body clock:http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7414437.stm

    If anyone has any tips for dealing with ear problems (it takes forever for my eustachian tubes to open up after a plane trip), I’d be grateful. I usually chew gum during the landing and the last few times that did not help at all. I also find that the Valsalva maneuover leaves my ears more sore (and they just close up again after they pop). Oh I almost forgot. I used to travel for running races and in fact have even completed about a 10k run in an airport (not recommended, although you get some interesting looks!!), but I was a competitive athlete at the time and we felt we had to keep moving whilst in transit. Running in stairwells makes perfect sense to me. :) Cheers!

    [Reply]

    Miss Jodi Reply:

    Hi, I read your post and was thinking about ear candles. Try them, maybe take a couple of pairs with you and use them once you get to your destination. They are unreal and have a number of health benefits apart from helping with this issue you were discussing. The best ones to get are from a health food shop and the brand is called Hopi Ear Candles. Good luck. And thanks for the tip about not eating on planes.pretty smart move, hey! No brained really.
    Although…. I totally recommend taking your own tea green bags and sachets of miso soup, they are great. And I get this all the time that I’m a bit weird for cutting up a whole bunch of fresh ginger and store it in a small plastic container and you just add hot water. Ginger is awesome for circulation, it’s warming and is excellent for your blood.

    Some fresh rosemary twigs in hot water (with some honey or agave nectar if you want sweet) is a very effective anti- inflammatory as well. They also don’t take up much room in your hand bag or man bag! Not sure about the rules for international flights though.

    Another thing I swear by is taking a dry body brush with me wherever I go and use it every day. It also stimulates circulation and gets rid of dead skin calls. I have been doing this for over 12 years and helps the lymphatic system. Dr. Jensen’s dry body brushes are the most superior ones on the market and I have tried most.

    Bit of a lengthly reply, here. It’s my first time posting so might as well try and be
    thorough! :)
    I have been reading all the tips here, they are great.
    Love this site
    xox

    [Reply]

    Stephanie Reply:

    Thank you very much!! What terrific ideas. I’m going to try all of them!

    [Reply]

    freefalling Reply:

    Miss Jodi – do you know where I can buy Dr Jensen’s brushes on-line?
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    freefalling Reply:

    I should have added – from on-line Australia.

    Miss Jodi Reply:

    Hi, I used to be able to get the Dr.Jensen brushes from health food stores, now unless you get them online, they are a bit harder to come by. I need to get another one so fortutitously have been looking online lately. I havent been able to find them available online is Australia for a while. You can get them at Health.superstore.com for under 10 and at the moment Amazon is selling them for around 7, so thats probably where I will get mine from. I’ve tried a few others but they dont seem to be as well made. If you do need one, like yesterday there is a place in Queensland called bodecare that you can get them online. I bought a number of products from them, and most of them were really overpriced for what you can get the Dr. Jensen ones for and most of the brushes lost lots of the hairs. Pretty disappointing but again, try them if you want one now but the quality of the Dr.J’s really is excellent and I’ve been using them for over 12 years. They’re really good. Hope that helps x

    freefalling Reply:

    thanks miss j – will check them out.

    Dani Reply:

    I have lots of trouble with my ears when flying & scuba diving.

    Vicks vapo drops are much better than gum for dealing with the problem on planes: a hot tip from a flight attendant when I flew with an ear infection and thought my ear drums would pop on descent (not smart!) They totally works.

    Those “ear plane” things are a godsend. They function well as earplugs too, although you need to leave them in for the duration of the flight, so I tend to use them on shorthaul domestic flights.

    Also: salt water is great for clearing out gunk & keeping your sinuses happy during flights, especiallly with all the recycled air. A saline nasal spray is good, I also like a saltwater swim the day of the flight (if that’s an option – it’s not for everyone, I know)

    And at times, I’ve been known to pop a sudafed before I fly (the one you have to give your licence details for, NOT Sudafed PE) which is not ideal but when I have a cold/ infection plus my general ear issues, it helps. There are stronger nasal sprays your doctor can prescribe if you have an essential flight, but obviously flying when you’ve got an infection and congestion is rarely a good idea if you can avoid it.

    [Reply]

    Stephanie Reply:

    Thanks! That’s the weird thing. I haven’t had any infection or congestion when flying (or at least any that I was aware of). I rarely get colds or have any nasal congestion. I had heard the sudafed option before. I have a feeling that I have weird Eustachian tubes or a fluid regulation issue. I’m going to try out some of these tips though. They can’t hurt!

    [Reply]

  • Jan

    Someone has pasted a horrible photo on your facebook!

    Thanks for travel tips :)

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    is it just a photo of someone else? that happens a bit.

    [Reply]

    Jan Reply:

    No, have a look…your arm has been severed!!

    [Reply]

    Jan Reply:

    Looks like you have removed photo now.

  • Laura

    Hi Sarah
    Great post! Speaking of saunas, do you have a view on whether the health benefits of infrared saunas are $40 better than the one at the gym…?
    L x

    [Reply]

  • pip

    Wow Sarah, you sound like me. Travelling is a total mission when it comes to staying healthy. My suitcase is filled with my little buckweat/rice flour savoury scones which keep me full through the day and don’t mess with my digestion. I tend to choose soup for dinner too as it’s less risky. Otherwise, fish is another option.

    I’m happiest if the hotel has a little kitchenette so I can whip up all my food from scratch. I always take quinoa with me – easy to boil up and very filling! If it’s a hotel with just a kettle, quinoa flakes are the way to go because they only need to be mixed with boiling water to produce quinoa porridge. Other essentials – cinnamon (anti inflammatory and good sugar replacement), herbal leaf teas (and tea strainer) and a hot water bottle for any tummy pain. I’m with you on the ear plugs thing – or else meditation music to help me drift off.

    Great post!! xx

    [Reply]

  • http://www.inspacesbetween.com Rach

    Very useful post, thanks Sarah! I spend an inordinate amount of time when I’m travelling wondering how “hosties” do it… I worry about their digestion and skin (you think you’re bonkers?!) because I know how much it affects me. Thanks for sharing your tips, the Vital Greens and chia sachets are a great idea and I’m definitely getting some melatonin for my next overseas trip. For something a bit more
    ‘shallow’, I load my skin up with rosehip oil before I fly and then use those (delightful) cloth face masks that make you look like a serial killer once I’m at my hotel. Both work wonders on tired, meh skin.

    [Reply]

  • Amber

    Awesome post today. Like many others I travel a lot for work and have up until now just put up with the ill effects. Will definitely take on some of your top tips!
    Thank you .

    [Reply]

  • Mia

    Does melatonin have any ill effects on hypothyroid people? I’m reading up on it and some of the information looks worrying, in that it can exacerbate antibody attacks on the thyroid, but some people are saying it’s fine. Thoughts, anyone?

    [Reply]

  • http://www.mikewilde.com mike wilde

    Pet gripe I have about Saunas in OZ is that people don’t shower B4 they enter them.
    Absolute no-no in other countries ..
    Don’t have to be Einstein to work out why

    [Reply]

    mike wilde Reply:

    p.s Great tips here. Spent many years on the road and in the end it was anonymous ceiling no. 423 (I think) that finally got to me.

    [Reply]

  • Alex

    Hi Sarah,

    I promise I don’t mean this in a snarky way at all but I was wondering about your feelings on the environmental impact of flying that often? I understand in your line of work it’s probably unavoidable but I spose I figured you may have some thoughts as you seem a thoughtful person. There are some fantastic tips in this article, thanks!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Not snarky at all and a good question. I feel a little wrong about it. Often. But the way I live my life tends to go this way…there are some unavoidable costs, which I offset by living as ethically as I can in other areas.So in this instance, I fly, but I cycle everywhere I can the rest of the time. Here In Byron I live a very low carbon-mile life and I’ve only owned a car for 6 years of my life. I’ve always cycled. I won’t be living this way (flying a lot) for too long. It’s an interim thing while I get my book done.

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    Not really a health tip but good for sanity – if you can afford it book a driver to do all your car transfers – there’s nothing worse than standing in that dreaded taxi line with stressed out coughing business types not to mention all the cigarette smoke coming from all the smokers getting their first or last puff in! You will be surprised that it doesn’t actually cost that much more than a taxi…

    [Reply]

  • Lou

    A 3 year old box of panty liners?! Good God.

    After culling your belongings by 60%, how did these manage to make the move up north? LOL

    [Reply]

  • Anne

    I swear by Melatonin. Not the over-the counter one, but the prescription only one made by a compound chemist. I am a nurse and due to the shift work, which varies every week, my body clock was truly out of whack. I take it an hour before bedtime, even if my bedtime is 7am since i’ve just finished a night duty. And the bonus is that Melatonin is also an antioxidant. I find it helps me get to sleep faster, and has no residual effects for me, such as drowsiness.
    I also installed a blockout blind in my bedroom so that if I need to sleep during the day, we can make the room really dark. Husband travels alot for work, and uses these same ideas.

    [Reply]

  • http://oneaprilmorning.net Laura

    Love all of these tips Sarah : ) I am hoping to do a lot of travelling so they will come in very handy. xx

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    Do you eat plane food on long haul flights or just eat what you’ve packed? I am always tempted to order a Gluten Free meal but then I get a bunch of other things on the tray that I can’t eat – so it’s a catch 22.

    [Reply]

  • Ros

    I’ve heard humidiflyers are great for preventing plane bugs! Often used by frequently traveling opera singers.

    http://www.humidiflyer.com/

    [Reply]

  • http://thechocolatefigsf.com Sarah

    This post was much needed. Thank you! I so agree with the packets of greens, I carry them around even when I’m not traveling so I can pour into my water bottle whenever I need to. I also make individual zip-top bags of muesli or nut/seed mix with shredded coconut so I have breakfast if there’s nothing else available.

    [Reply]

  • Kylie

    A friend recommended Ear Planes to me once and I’ve never flown without them since. They stop the horrible popping during the flight and pain afterwards. I put them in as soon as I’m settled in my seat and don’t take them out until I’ve seen a steward open the door (it’s a pressure thing). They’re also great ear plugs and after never being able to sleep on flights I’m almost always able to now.
    I also always take food with me for flights. Even if it’s just a small bag of nuts, just something. I can’t eat anything they serve on planes and probably wouldn’t want to either. I also really like the Jurlique face mist sprays. I sometimes spray the lavender one on my pillow as a relaxer before bed, but the Camomile one is really good for sensitive skin.
    I’ll definitely look into the Vital Greens sachets. Thanks for the tip.

    [Reply]

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  • Gabrielle

    This is brilliant – thank you so much! Being a thyroidy type, I recently discovered the extra joys of long haul plane travel (and I thought keeping my meds cool would be the only trouble…).
    I’ll be on another flight soon, but armed against the dodgy-ness with your nifty ideas :)

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    What’s the deal with keeping thyroxine/ oroxine cool anyway?? When I traveled last it was ok to leave it out of the fridge entirely, now its no more than 30 days, but some pharmacists say it has to be kept cool all the time. It’s frustrating when nobody can agree!

    [Reply]

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  • http://www.thegpsgirl.com Karen Jacobsen

    Essence of Vali have an amazing range of “Sleep” products. All totally natural and not sure if/where available in Australia but you can buy from Vali’s website. I love the Sleep mist and spray on my pillow before I sleep. It’s heaven.

    [Reply]

  • http://samantharoddy.blogspot.com samantha

    hi sarah,

    i have a recommendation! i super love using the little coffee pot in the room to make a steam bath for my face. i put the water through the machine with no coffee and then stick my head over the open pot with a towel over my head. then i do a kind of meditation which is basically, breathing deep imagining the steam going through out my body and rejuvenating me. i really love it in the winter b/c it warms me up. i love it in the summer b/c it helps with the temperature changes between outside nice and inside cold. it helps all sorts of ways.

    thinking about it right now makes me want to go get it on with our office coffee machine. ha!

    i’ve been reading your blog for a few months now…i can’t remember where i found it….but i have been completely astonished that the silly things i do to make myself happy (turning off appliances and sleeping flipped on my bed are just a few of a bunch of things you have covered that i have done privately for years!) are things that have some grounding in science. the flipped sleeping thing happened just because one night, i simply could not sleep. i heard the proverb – do what you always do and get what you’ve always got – in my head. so, for some reason, i got up and put my head where my feet usually are. i slept like a freaking baby that night, after a few hours of tossing about. (i’m a good sleeper usually) my husband is totally flabbergasted at this, it makes no sense to him, but he’s cool with it. a few times i’ve opted to sleeping on the sofa or spontaneously heading for the guest room. it is refreshing! it sorta makes me feel like i did when i was a kid falling asleep in trees.

    so…about the turning-off-things thing…i didn’t realize it helped me. i have hashimodos….i will do some research here. amazing.

    thanks for opening up my eyes!!
    samantha

    [Reply]

    Tracy Reply:

    Hi Samantha, I have always slept ‘upside down’ when it’s too hot, thought I was the only one!
    Love your coffee pot steamer trick.

    Tracy :)

    [Reply]

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  • Morgan

    Instead of soluble asprin, have you tried wintergreen oil? If lavender oil works for you, I’d give it a go; it’s been called “nature’s asprin” and relieves pain/sore muscles if you use it topically with a big inhaling breath and a little application to the bottoms of your feet (where we have the biggest pores on our bodies). Lavender oil on your feet would probably work wonders too.

    [Reply]

  • http://thenatureofbalance.com.au Carolina Gonzalez

    I absolutely love to travel……here is the list of my goodie bag…..1.melatonin 2. max gxl to ensure liver detoxication from all the free radicals inflight 3. True greens by lifeforce 4. Body balance sticks ( aloe vera & seaweed) best phytonutrient, mineral rich, natural ionic product 5. probiotic the one that does not need refrigeration 6. Travel essence by Australian Bush flowers 5. nuts and seeds 6. salts & clay for a bath 7. lots of inspiring books and a wish list for a wonderful and safe trip!!!!! ……….. Pasadena …….Hay House retreat here I come!

    [Reply]

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  • Erin

    Hi Sarah,
    I have a question about Vital Greens. Is it Gluten Free? It has wheat grass in it so am thinking that it wouldnt be, but you take it so maybe it is?
    I checked the website and couldnt find the answer to my question.
    If you could help me out I would appreciate it.
    Thanks for your blog, it is awesome.

    [Reply]

    Olivia Reply:

    Hi Erin,

    Yes, it’s gluten-free.
    It says so on the FAQ page on their website ( http://www.martinandpleasance.com/brands/vital/vital-greens-faq/ ).

    [Reply]

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  • Georgia

    hi Sarah,
    this is such a wonderful post!!
    i am about to do a 4 week travel of southern Europe by bus! i have typed all your notes into my phone so i can glance back if im struggling!!
    do you have any suggestions for bus travellers??? should i treat it like plane travel??

    [Reply]

  • http://www.supervitalgreens.com.au Jenny Barlow

    Thank for the great post. I will take on all your tips for my trip to Europe in winter. One thing I swear by, esepcially in 3rd world countries, where it is hard to get veggies, is the Vital Greens Travel Satchels.

    [Reply]

  • friend

    I make a list of who my people are in each town that I am traveling in. I try to plan travel so that it is in small chunks and intermediated by normal rhythms like meals and prayers on the ground. I try to meet up with a close friend soon after arriving, maybe at the meal that happens right after. I remind myself that it is okay to be who I am even if I am in a completely new and strange place where I am not used to being a slow-walking, meditative, vibrant person. I practice the blessing “peace be with everything before me and behind me, to my left and to my right, above me and below me, that I can see and that I cannot see, that I can imagine and that I cannot imagine, that I like, that I do not like,” thereby connecting all of the earth that I experience and do not experience.

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