Sally Fallon’s tips for eating breakfast

Posted on September 6th, 2011

I’m a big fan of Sally Fallon and her “bible” Nourishing Traditions (in fact it’s my all-time favourite manual…I VERY much recommend it). She’s an adherent to the Weston A Price way of living, which is similar to Paleo living, which is similar to how I eat (I’ve personally found it the best approach for my auto-immune issues).

photo via The Alkaline Sisters

Anyway, in a recent edition of WAP’s Wise Traditions Magazine (by Jen Allbritton), they ran a rundown on the best tricks for eating breakfast based on Sally’s principles. So I’ve shared a few below. I recently shared a post on how to eat breakfast without sugar and grains…this kinda builds on it. I know a stack of you were interested in reading more. Yeah?

5 Weston A Price breakfast tricks:

  • fats and protein should be the featured nutrients, as they are critical for brain chemistry balance (these include egg, meat, fish, full fat dairy including yoghurt, kefir, nuts and seeds, coconut oil, butter, avocados).
  • fruit, veggies, tubers and whole grains make a wonderful side note.
  • make at least a portion of breakfast food easily digestible through soaking grains, or sour leavening, culturing dairy, fermenting fruits and vegetables.
  • don’t rush. Relax through your morning meal.
  • plan ahead.

Some breakfast favourites from fellow WAP foodies:

Sally Fallon: bake no-nitrate bacon in a pan with fruit (such as apple slices, apricot, peaches or nectarines, or with cherry tomatoes and mushrooms). Serve with eggs of any style – scrambled, fried. Enjoyed with a glass of raw milk. Breakfast tonic favourites include swedish bitters, beet kvass, cod liver oil, high vitamin butter oil mixed with warm water.

Jill Cruz: try this berry smoothie – three tablespoons of raw yoghurt, two tablespoons of raw cream, one half cup of fresh berries, two/three raw egg yolks. Blend and drink. If you leave out the yoghurt, increase the cream to 3/4 tablespoons and only add 2 egg yolks, it turns into a lovely mousse that you can eat with a spoon!

Jen Allbritton:  my favourite is a one-skillet veggie egg scramble. Saute veggies (whatever is handy – something like a mix of onion, cabbage, carrots, zucchini, and peppers) in plenty of butter or coconut oil. Once the veggies are soft, drop in two eggs and mix in. Flip the mixture until the eggs are cooked through. Accompany with feta cheese, raw cherry tomatoes and a clump of raw sauerkraut.

I’ve been cooking these:

I posted these breakfast ideas on Twitter recently:

This one is pumpkin cooked off in coconut oil (when you sprinkle a little salt on pumpkin in the pan, it softens and cooks nice n fast), cinnamon, toasted pepitas (tossed in towards the end with the pumpkin), coconut (tossed in right at the end; it toasts super fast) and frozen peas (added in the bowl). I ate it with sheeps milk yoghurt.
And the one below is warm sprouted peas (I always cook them a little in a pan with some chicken stock that I keep in the freezer in the iceblock tray; click here for my directions for making sprouts), avocado, spinach, chia seeds, corn (left over, hanging in the fridge), anchovies and fetta!

Some recipes that you provided:

Pip: I make a breakfast ‘salsa’ which can really be made from anything on hand. I generally have boiled eggs in the fridge, so I start with one or two of those, and chop them up. Then I add chopped avocado, tomato, fresh parsley (or coriander), kale or baby spinach (wilted if I have time, fresh if I don’t), sometimes some meat (salmon, bacon or ham) and sometimes some lemon or lime juice. Just chop into chunks, toss and eat! Looks good, is light but filling and transports well to work too.

Mia: I love eggs with a dash of chilli powder (to wake you up!) with a side of avocado and tomato. Occasionally bacon also. Yuuuum.

Caitlin: Pear and Cinnamon compote with coconut cream: Peal, core and chop 3 pears. Toss in saucepan with chunk of organic butter, splash of cinnamon, handful of coconut flakes, goji berries and/or sultanas. Heat on low for around 10 mins depending how mushy you want your pears. Serve with dollop of coconut cream or yoghurt if desired! Warming and lovely for winter.

Kate:  Handful each of frozen raspberries and blueberries (thawed). Large handful of nuts (I rotate between almonds, macadamias, walnuts and pecans). Small handful of pepitas. Half a tablespoon of chia seeds (soaked in water overnight to aid digestion). Half a teaspoon of cinnamon. Pinch each of nutmeg and cloves. Small handful organic coconut flakes. Coconut milk – enough to mix plus a little more if you like. Mix and eat!! YUMM!

Amy:  I have been making this sort of thing into a quick and easy mug muffin. Mash .5-1 banana in a mug, mix in 1 tablespoon Almond Meal + a dash of cinnamon, a sprinkle of Sultanas and 1 beaten egg. Mix it all together. Pop in the microwave for 90 seconds and Voila! Mug Muffin, sans grains, dairy and refined sugar. These are great as a quick Pre/Post workout meal. And they can be made the night before and eaten cold too. Just make sure they cool completely before you put them in a tuppaware container or the moisture makes them a little soggy. Another option for those who can’t do sugar, but would like some carbs/starch, is to add mashed Sweet Potato instead of the Banana. And then spread some nut butter on it to beef it up a little bit more. Just like conventional muffins, you could really put almost anything in them.. Pumpkin, Zucchini, Berries, Apple etc

Alejandra:  A shake made with 1/2 refrigerated and 1/2 frozen coconut milk (I freeze it in ice cube trays), unsweetened cocoa powder, cayenne, turmeric, ginger, cardamom, black pepper, and a bit of celtic salt. The spice is just fantastic. Another option is some mushrooms diced really tiny and sauteed with butter, onions, and tarragon. (Something about the tarragon is especially lovely with mushrooms).

 PS Alejandra, love the coconut milk in ice cube tray idea! And Amy, Mug muffin! That is awesome!

 

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  • Rachel

    I love the mug muffin idea! But I have no idea what Almond meal is – is it something you buy in Oz? Do you reckon we’ll have something like it in NZ, or is it something I could make myself?

    [Reply]

    Belinda Freestone Reply:

    Hi Rachel, almond meal is basically ground up almonds that I think had their husks (skins) removed prior to the grinding… You could put some raw blanched almonds in a processor and process until it looks like a thick flour… It’s used in place of flour if you’re eating gluten free… recipes using almond meal stay moist and not dry like flour can sometimes be…

    [Reply]

    Belinda Freestone Reply:

    Ps- yes, it is something you can buy here in oz in packets in the supermarket where your packet nuts are… Now that you know what it is, you may be able to find it there…

    [Reply]

    Teresa Reply:

    I’ve seen them here in NZ in the supermarkets, either in (expensive) packets in the baking and dried stuff aisle, or in the bulk bins. If you’re in Auckland, huckleberry farms also sells it, they keep it in the fridge.

    [Reply]

  • Jasmin

    For the past two weeks I have been having Kimberly Snyder’s Glowing Green Smoothie and have never felt better, she talks about eating meals light to heavy and it has improved my energy levels so much!

    [Reply]

    Jemma Reply:

    Hi Jasmin – that smoothie sounds fabulous – would you mind posting the recipe?? Thanks! x

    [Reply]

    Jasmin Reply:

    Hey Jemma,
    The recipe is 1 1/2 cups water, 1 head organic romaine lettuce chopped, 1/2 head of a large bunch of organic spinach, 3-4 stalks organic celery chopped, 1 organic apple cored and chopped, 1 organic pear cored and chopped, 1 organic banana, juice of 1/2 organic lemon and optional (I add these) 1/3 bunch organic coriander and parsley!

    Add the water and chopped head of romaine and spinach to the blender. Starting on low speed, mix until smooth. Gradually moving to higher speeds, add the celery, apple and pear. Add the coriander and parsley, then the banana and lemon juice last!

    I also add kale and a teaspoon of coconut oil, chia seeds and acai berry powder, it makes about 4 cups and keeps in the fridge 3 days max but I make mine every second day, it’s actually really yummy too.

    She has just brought out a book called “The Beauty Detox Solution” which is pretty amazing, it goes against the traditional way of eating and preparing food eg light in the morning and heavy at night, her blog is full of good info too.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Jasmine, that’s kind of you to share. Ta!

    Jemma Reply:

    Yes, thanks Jasmin! Very kind of you. I might make a modified version with less fruit but great idea to add kale, coco oil and chia… I’ll def do that too. x

  • Nicole

    I’ve gotten into a number of beautiful/nutritious foods thanks to the info provided in this blog; activated nuts, raw cacao nibs, Paris Creek yoghurt, unhomogenized milk…. The latest is coconut butter!
    I’ve just had brekky – blueberries tossed in 1tsp melted coconut butter, topped with full fat natural yoghurt and pepitas. Delicious!!
    I feel (and, I think, look) wonderful.
    Keep up the fabulous articles Sarah (and readers’ comments are awesome too).

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    I agree, Nicole, the reader comments are awesome. I’m glad everyone shares them.

    [Reply]

    Nicole Reply:

    Hi Sarah,
    A quick question re: activated nuts. You’ve posted before about how to ‘activate nuts’ at home by soaking/sprinkling with salt/cooking overnight. I want to try this as they can be pretty expensive to buy from health food stores.
    My question is… are only certain types of nuts suitable to ‘activate’? I ask this because when I buy them packaged at health food shops, I can only seem to find almonds, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, brazil nuts (i.e. not cashews, macadamias), even in packets of ‘mixed nuts’, cashews and macadamias never seem to be included.
    Thanks again :)

    [Reply]

    Malikah Reply:

    I very carefully followed Sally’s recipes on activating nuts…. bought a huge amount of organic & pesticide free varieties… don’t make my mistake of cooking at celsius instead of farenheit. How many people in Australia use farenheit? Well sadly not this one…. I ruined $80 worth of nuts!!! eeek. BUT NOW I KNOW!! lol.

    Sally please add the ‘F’ to the temps in the recipes in Nourishing Traditions.

    Sarah if you do cashews it’s more involved so check out Sally’s tips on soaking & drying them.

    cheers,

  • Dani

    I’m not sure if I agree with the entire conspiracy theory behind breakfast put forward in this article someone just shared with me, but it does seem to fit neatly with today’s post, so here you go!:

    http://www.alternet.org/food/152260/why_the_breakfast_most_americans_will_eat_today_is_a_corporate_scam?page=1

    [Reply]

    Monkey Mia Reply:

    It’s not really a conspiracy theory. Dairy and cereal grains bring billions to the American economy, it’s not really surprising that the government would encourage their consumption even though pasturised milk and processed wheat have essentially NO nutrients and are highly allergenic. I think the ridiculous food pyramid that we got taught in high school is the best example. Its not a conspiracy if its in plain sight.

    Did you see when Jamie Oliver did his school special in the states, where it was legislation that every meal he cooked for the school children HAD to include a bread portion and I think a milk as well? Interestingly, there was no legislation saying they needed vitamin or nutrient content, proteins, fruits or vegetables. Just bread. Hmm…

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    The food pyramid is based on the US one, which is put out be a body funded by food interest groups. True.

    [Reply]

  • Rosie

    I like getting different ideas for breakfast. I live on gluten free porridge at the moment, as I’m intolerant to eggs and yoghurt, so I always welcome different thoughts. I’m keen to find more protein based recipes, especially as it’s coming up to summer and I don’t fancy having porridge so much..

    [Reply]

    Bella Reply:

    Hi Rosie,

    I with you – warm porridge and summer don’t mix!! I’ve been having millet puffs ( 99% positive they’re GF). I LOVE breakfast and enjoy the feeling of having something substantial but not leaving you too weighed down. These millet puffs (which you can buy in natural food stores or even Coles) are really light but it just means that I have this enourmous bowl full ( so feel like I can ho into it!!) and have been making my own almond milk and adding cinnamon, nuts and a coconut butter granola clusters (for texture) onto it. If I’m feeling like something a little more sweet, then I add the real deal maple syrup and/or a medjool date………

    Also, though I eat oats and I know they’re not GF, I mix them with water/milk the night before with chia seeds so they increase in volume and are ready to go in the morn and sometimes put an egg (although not essentail) for protein and keep them together a bit better and fry them up in the morning and make oatmeal pancakes. You can have these hot or leave them to get cool (as I have been doing for the warmer months) and have stewed fruit and natural yoghurt and or nut butters and yoghurt) I sprinkle with flaked almonds. Can save for the following day too….Maybe you could do this with your GF porrdige mix???? xx

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    Hi Bella

    Thanks for your suggestions. I will look into the millet puffs for mornings when I just can’t be bothered and want something quick. I also really love your idea of oatmeal pancakes (minus the egg!) :-)

    Rosie

    [Reply]

    Bettina Reply:

    Hi Rosie,

    For vegan protein-rich breakfasts, I suggest replacing eggs with chickpeas in variations of Pip’s and Mia’s recipes. Basically, chickpeas, avocados, tomatoes, chili powder, lemon juice, and salt and pepper make a delicious breakfast. Toss in herbs if you have them around.

    Hope that helps!
    Bettina

  • Sheralee

    Sarah, where can I find a copy of the Wise Traditions mag?

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    it’s mail order only – look up on internet! x

    [Reply]

  • Monkey Mia

    That mug muffin idea is AWESOME! I need to try that.

    This morning I had the best breakfast smoothie. Strawberries, blueberries, natural unsweetened yoghurt, coconut water, flax meal, a raw egg and cinnamon. So deliciously yummy and not too sweet, which I love.

    [Reply]

  • Sheralee

    I have a breaky smoothie most days; banana, frozen strawberries, frozen mango, LSA, chia, coconut oil, pea protein powder, vital greens, yogurt & rice milk. Delicious!!

    [Reply]

    Allie Reply:

    Can anyone tell me? Are corn puffs good? I am sworn off oats these days and, of course, muesli – and like these little morsels instead, having experimented with many alternatives some of which tasted like polystyrene. No added sugar just fat little balls of corn. Is corn ok? Doesn’t seem to upset my tummy and added to with a mix of almond, coconut and a little cows’ milk, berries and Greek yogurt and nuts and seed ( and the obligatory spoonful of coconut oil – its winter now, so gone solid!), I m in heaven at breakfast time! ( my favorite meal of the day, so ‘heaven’ is where I like to be first thing in the morning, meals -wise!) feedback anyone?

    [Reply]

  • Carolyn

    the muffin sounds a little like the atkins “muffin in a minute” We dont have fruit in it of course. It is made with flaxseed meal, cinnamon, baking powder an egg and a little butter. I call them a little miracle

    [Reply]

  • http://www.twitter.com/littlemissmelbn LittleMissMelbourne

    Hi Sarah

    I’m just not organised or hungry enough in the mornings to have breakfast at home. Can you suggest any breakfast ideas that are good to grab on the go once the day has begun and suitable for ‘at the desk’? I’ve been having quick protein shakes once I get to work which is getting more than a little dull…

    Thanks!

    LMM xoxo

    [Reply]

    Terry Reply:

    Have you considered a nice delicious smoothie made up of fruits, oats, skimmed milk etc?

    [Reply]

    Terry Reply:

    Yeah, sometimes I wish they wld sell “Astronaut food” (that comes in a paste out of a tube) so that it wld plug that hole in the tummy, yet provide the nutrition we need….but smoothies made up of healthy ingredients is the next best thing I suppose….

    [Reply]

    Jemma Reply:

    You could try making your super smoothie at home the night before, and take it to work in a jar or protein shaker…I love frozen blueberries, lots of natural yoghurt, coconut oil, stacks of cinnamon, 2 raw organic eggs, chia,and either coconut water/raw milk/nut milk. Yum!

    [Reply]

    Bettina Reply:

    Hard-boiled eggs + pesto or romanesco sauce in little jars or just plain with flavored salt and pepper.

    [Reply]

  • Jemma

    Lately I’ve been making a yummy high-protein breaky pancake with 2 organic eggs plus one egg white, beaten, add cinnamon, dollop or two of yoghurt, stevia, vanilla or nutmeg, some extra protein powder if desired – beat it all together and make an omlette-pancake in a non-stick pan with a little coconut oil. Serve warm with extra yoghurt and cinnamon on the side – filling and delicious. Ive also been experimenting adding bits of coconut flesh/berries or chia and coconut water to the mix. xx

    [Reply]

  • Dharma

    Hi,

    I was wondering if anyone knows much about low carb diets an Hashimotto’s? I have Hashimotto’s and have just started seeing a personal trainer who also is giving guidance on nutrition. I have been given a range of 90 g of carbs a day, 120 protein and 85g fat? I’ve never done anything like this – its really a kickstart for summer, a 9 week challenge to loose some weight gained over winter. Normally I don’t do these things and rather follow a very normal diet.

    Any feedback is welcomed if anyone knows more?

    Thanks :-)

    [Reply]

    Monkey Mia Reply:

    Honestly, low carb didn’t work for me. Yet I know of other people with AI disease who swear by it, so I think it has more to do with all bodies being different than AI disease! I ate low carb for maybe 4 months and eventually gave up, spent a week gorging on pizzas and pasta, and then lost more weight during the pizza week than I had in the last 4 months!

    Unfortunately, you can become qualified to be a PT in about 8 weeks, which is why a lot of them are limited in their nutritional knowledge and give the same diet advice to every client. (I used to live with one.) You should always listen to your body first and foremost! We are all different, and we all need different ratios of nutrients. Experiment, see what works for you, and avoid gluten at all costs, would be my advice. Good luck! xx

    [Reply]

  • Kirsty

    Hi Sarah,
    Thanks for such a great blog. A. few months ago i started to really notice my body getting sick. Small things, lots of small things, but enough to really make me notice. Candida overgrowth, nose bleeds, laryngitis. Like you i was pushing myself too hard, wanting perfection and control over everything. Needed coffee to get through my day, and wine, oh beautiful wine, to wind down at the end of the day. After numerous tests, it turns out i have tested positive for an auto immune disease. I have seen a naturopath and i am following a very similar diet to the one you seem to follow. My biggest down fall is baking…….and um, wine. But i am changing my lifestyle, everyday i take time for myself, i eat so much better and i am trying to slow down. Which is hard with young children but surely a must.
    One thing i have found, is most doctors willingness to prescribe medication for you, yet no interest in solving the original problem. If it wasnt for my natural curiousity and love of reading, i dont think i would be any better.
    So thank you, for providing such fabulous information and also a connection for people so they dont feel so alone inthis journey.
    Oh, and what are your thoughts on Xylitol. Baking with my kiddies is something we love to do :) so i am trying to find a happy medium.
    Thanks.

    [Reply]

  • sonja

    how do you deal with the animal cruelty when eating meat,even organic meat is killed but wants to live like the rest of us,what do you think and have a look at the on milk website it will deffinately open your eyes to how bad milk is for us,thanksX

    [Reply]

  • sonja

    I mean’t to write even organic meat is killed the same way as the other non organic meat x

    [Reply]

  • http://www.parentwellbeing.com Jodie Benveniste @ Parent Wellbeing

    Am eating Amy’s mug muffin as I type. Truly delicious! Thanks for sharing!

    [Reply]

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  • Shell

    I too have just tried the mug muffin – fantastic and so quick! I added flaxseed and soaked chia seeds to mine, along with some raspberries and cinnamon. I’d be keen to try a savoury version next! Thanks so much Amy and Sarah!

    [Reply]

  • http://glutenfreesoyfree.wordpress.com Amy

    I recently found a potential cure for those with gluten intolerance and celiac disease – Dr. Wise’s Gluten Relief – I made a post about the whole matter @ http://bit.ly/oN2vQ4

    Thought you might be interested. Feel free to read and leave your comments on the post. Jason@JLHealth is answering any questions that arise. Sounds promising…

    [Reply]

  • http://www.sarahwilson.com.au Cathy

    Hi Sarah/Anyone,

    Does anyone know WHERE to find nitrate-free bacon? Have looked and looked and cannot find anywhere! Was told that it is illegal to produce cured meats with nitrates in Australia. Even tried GrassRoots at Vaucluse – no go.

    Am in Sydney in Sutherland Shire.

    Love your blog Sarah! Am in (my personal) Week 2 sugar-free and finding it harder this week than last, but certainly not impossible. Bought Supercharged Foods cookbook and now swear by it! Made it my mission to cook one recipe per day from book. Thanks for tip!

    [Reply]

    Genevieve Reply:

    Yes @ nourishedlife.com.au

    [Reply]

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  • http://mymezzaluna.com Edwina

    If only we could eat eggs….that would make the world of difference.

    [Reply]

  • margaret

    Day 14 with no sugar! Some days are harder than others however the difference in the way I look and feel, especially my skin make it all worth it. Is it okay to eat prunes?

    [Reply]

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