what nutritionists order when they eat out

Posted on September 27th, 2011

Me, I get a little tired of food types banging on about their amazing eating habits. I mean, I MUST really annoy some of you with all my “sprout this”, “slow cook” that rants. So perhaps I should mention, I also eat in food courts. And at 7-Eleven. Because I get really hungry and I move about a bit and just have to eat and not be too precious sometimes.

I approached some of the food types who contribute on this blog and asked if they’d come clean with their on-the-run eating  tricks. We all do it. Eat crap and live to see another day!

Mine are thus,

* I avoid Thai (the coconut cream is great, but it’s full of palm sugar). Greek is great. Pubs are my favourite. Indian is OK (coconut cream with less sugar!)

* At food courts, I eat meat. Kebab joints – the straight up meat (with their salady stuff). The beef stew. etc. These stews are likely to have homely ingredients (my experience dating chefs is that Mum makes these dishes and keeps it pretty unadulterated). I avoid anything with sauce, or bready stuff and steer wellllllll clear of salad bars with dressing.

* If you eat sandwiches, ask for it to be made up with your ingredients – pre-made ones are full of gunky sauces. Ask for mustard. Full fat cheese and tuna, toasted, is pretty safe.

* At corner shops/ 7-elevens:  I like Kat’s advice below – just buy the dark chocolate and be done with it.

* Soup is always a good option. Again, often made simply and sometimes by a Mum.

* I’ve written about what I eat when I’m traveling here.

But over to the others now…do add your ideas below!

Thai

Lee Holmes is author of Supercharged Food: I usually order a chicken and cashew nut dish and ask for no sauce.  I say I’d just like to have it stir fried with garlic.  If you’re ordering a curry you can ask for it without sugar too and most Thai restaurants are happy to accommodate you.

Kat Eden is a nutritional coach, an author, and a motivational speakerI eat chicken and cashew nut stirfry with vegetables as my main dish. I usually ask for sauce on the side and either avoid it altogether or use just a little bit. Most of these sort of sauces will contain gluten, so if you’re looking to remain gluten free it’s best to avoid them. I do occasionally order prawn spring rolls, and will usually pull off most of the pastry. For me, given that I rarely eat this sort of food out, I tend to treat it as a semi-treat meal.

When it comes to Vietnamese food, one of my favourite (and healthiest) dishes to enjoy is a mango and prawn salad. This usually comes with a fresh chili sauce, which you could also order on the side.

Nat Kringoudis is a doctor of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncturist, natural fertility educator, writer and blogger: Salads are great although if you are sugar free, dressings can be chocked with sugar so asking for salad with a lemon wedge works for me (no dressing) and a steamed piece of fish.  I just try to keep it simple – the more complicated you make the order, the less likely you are to get what you ask for.

Zoe Bigley-Pulin is a nutritionist and chef:  Thai beef salad, beef or chicken satays, dry curries (without coconut milk) all served with jasmine rice and steamed vegetables.

Vanessa Rowe blogs at Low Flying Duck, sharing her experiences of living with coeliac disease: fresh rice paper rolls are a good option, but I check the dipping sauces, and ask about the use of soy sauce and thickeners. Soups can also be good – depending on how the stock and seasonings are done.

On the road at servos and 7-Elevens

Kat:  I don’t even bother trying to find good quality protein or fresh food – even if they do have fruit it’s probably been there a good week or two! Last week at 7/11 I bought an small bar of Lindt 70% dark chocolate, a small bag of Nobby’s raw nuts and seed mix, and a little block of cheddar cheese. This kept me going until I arrived home to ‘real’ food, and it didn’t give me that rapid spike followed by the crash that most snack foods will cause.

Nat: most servos stock natural yoghurt these days and many with fruits too – so I grab an apple or a banana and natural yoghurt to go, or a can of tuna and a salad – many also have salads in the fridge with the dressing separate.  My other fave is peanut butter and apple – if they have an ok small tub of peanut butter.  Nuts and dried fruit can also be available to grab for a snack on the run – oh and if I see an Emma and Tom’s fruit bar I know they are made with 3-4 ingredients and no sugar so I stock up!

Vanessa: No Chiko Rolls for me. Rice crackers, corn thins, yoghurt, nuts and fruit are usually my standards.

Pubs

Lee:  I order simple pub grub, usually steak and vegetables and I ask them to hold the sides.

Kat: I’ve found that allowing the fries to arrive and pretending you’ll have just one or two is a recipe for disaster! If if it’s served with sweet potato mash I  have some of that and order an additional side salad.  If we’re having a drink before ordering, and everyone else is snacking on bread, I’ll often order something like grilled prawns or calamari as a starter. It means spending more money, but I’d rather wake up the next day feeling great about having had a fun night out with good food choices, than have a bloated stomach and poor energy. As far as alcohol goes, my first choice is always red wine. Red wine is high in the antioxidant resveratrol, and choosing organic means no nasty toxins (which I believe are the main culprit when it comes to feeling hungover. White wine or champagne are the next best choice, also due to their antioxidant qualities. Pinot and merlot are best for helping to induce sleep, as they stimulate melatonin production. Shiraz tends to have the highest naturally occurring antioxidants.

Nat: If they have a slow cooked something on the menu I will often go for that also.

Vanessa: steak or seafood and salad are usually a possibility.

Sandwich bars/delis

Kat: This is probably one of my least favourite places to find myself needing food, as most of the options are heavy on starch and sugar and low on nutrition! If there is any sort of salad option I will choose that – definitely with sauce on the side. To be honest, most sandwich bars would have me just buying some nuts and maybe some fruit rather than try to make do with any of the foccacia/panini/past type options. I

Nat: make your own antipasto platter!  Yes they will look at you weird but they aren’t the ones who will regret it later if you don’t.  Sometimes they also have quiches.

Breakfast joints

Lee: Breakfast joints are fun cause you can order delicious omelettes and poached eggs and ask for it without toast. I try to order a green side with it too, so perhaps avocado or spinach so that the nutrients from the greens are delivered directly to my body with the combination of good fats.

Kat: This is an easy one! I’ll generally order an omelette or some poached eggs, with spinach/mushrooms/avocado, and no toast. Sometimes I’ll have avocado with that, or goats cheese if it’s available. Interestingly, one of the things I loved about travelling in the states was that all egg dishes come with potato – which they are happy to switch for fruit, and it was mostly berries. Berries are my favourite low GI carb to add to breaky; aside from that I prefer to start the day with protein and fat. This is optimal for slow-release energy and the minimisation of food cravings. You’ll also ‘program’ your body to burn fat when you start the day this day, rather than spiking insulin with so-called healthy cereals or even wholegrains, and programming your body to store fat.

Nat: Eggs!  I find breakfast quite easy to eat out for.  Many places offer GF bread which is a bonus – although often very high in sugar so weigh up your options.  I will do a big plate of eggs, spinach, tomato, mushrooms etc.  Or if there is a homemade muesli, I’ll grab some yoghurt (provided it’s without sugar) and eat that.  Beans work – just remember if beans get your pipes going, you can counteract the effects by chomping on any calming herbs that might appear with your dish – they are there for a reason!

Food courts

Lee: Felafal stores are good but if you have the works you could Felafal (feel awful) if you’ve over- indulged, so a good alternative is to order the felafal balls with salad, onion and hommus.

Kat: My go-to food court shop is Nandos or Grill’d. At Nandos I would order the chicken thighs with no sauce, and that’s it. And at Grill’d as you might no you can order a gluten free bun, but I prefer to save my carbs for less processed foods than bread, so I just go bunless. Usually they arrange it all nicely for you as a salad. If neither of those outlets are there, Japanese usually offers plenty of protein and veg options which can be ordered without sauce! If worst comes to worst it’s back to the salad bar.

Zoe: Lebanese/turkish meat on spit. This can be a good choice, as the fat drips away from the rotating spit roast and you get plenty of salad, tabouleh and hummus.

Nat: If there is Japanese, I often opt for that – many now use brown rice with their dishes, many do very basic curries etc and make it up in front of you rather than eating something that has been sitting there for 10+ hours (gross and as nutritional as CARDBOARD!). If I find Nando’s I can generally get a grilled something a rather with salad.  Fruit salad and suitable yoghurts are sometimes also available.

McDonalds/Burger King etc (when things are desperate)

Kat: Actually this did happen to me a year or so back on a road trip. We’d been stuck in traffic exiting Melbourne for over 2 hours and when we finally hit the freeway Maccas was the first thing we encountered. I was starving! I ordered an Angus burger and ate just the insides. My theory is that Angus beef is better quality :) … actually I was somewhat pleasantly surprised by this burger but it did still leave an oily taste. In theory going for a chicken salad is the healthier option but I find the salad ingredients to be very poor quality and you’re lucky to get a skerrick of chicken. Depending on the mix, some fast food outlet salads come in with a higher calorie and fat count than their burgers!


 

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  • http://econest.blogspot.com/ Maria Hannaford

    OKAY, I have an additional woe to add to the woes of eating out… I think about the conditions the animals were kept in prior to going to the slaughterhouse. Chicken always seems like the healthiest option when eating out, but unless it is FREE-RANGE I won’t touch it. That pretty much rules out eating chicken from, well, most places. Same goes with pork. I only buy free-range chicken and pork for home, as most people do, so why would I forget about that when eating out? I go for the vegetarian option at food courts etc. Unless you’re at a quality restaurant or cafe that specifies where the meat came from, you can safely bet it came from a factory farm. And I’m not willing to support that.

    [Reply]

    liz Reply:

    I was thinking the same thing.

    [Reply]

    sita simons Reply:

    I agree. I simply can’t eat meat in a food court or other similar places. I always think that the aim of the purveyors is to make as much profit as possible, so the produce will be the cheapest possible. I think my waitressing years opened my eyes too, lots of cafes saying they use free range, organic, etc and are just plain lying! It makes me wary.

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    Serena Reply:

    I completely agree. Meat is the last thing I would want from a food court, I just can’t bear to think where it has come from. I agree with Sita above too, it seems the words ‘free range’ are being bandied about more – sometimes without merit.

    I do like the falafel option though – good advice!

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    Dani Reply:

    Couldn’t agree more! What’s with all the meat overload anyway? I have been a vegetarian for more than 10 years and would rather eat carbs (gasp, god forbid) than contribute to the needless suffering of an animal.

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    TJK Reply:

    Totally with you. I’ll eat carbs over a tortured animal any day.

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    Lydia Reply:

    Totally agree – don’t touch chicken when out. Unfortunately, young, obese, unhealthy overfed birds are cheap to buy.

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  • http://www.anaustralianwintour.com Megan Aney

    Really useful article. I usually head to the salad bar thinking it’s the healthier option, how i was fooled!

    [Reply]

  • Miranda

    I like to get a baked potato with fresh coleslaw (without dressing if possible, which is actually more often than not), bean chilli, tabouli and avocado, cause I can’t do dairy. SO delicious! And you gotta eat the skin on the potato of course :)

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  • Belinda Freestone

    Just a question-

    I WAS getting very excited about the release of your e-book ‘How I quit sugar’… Does the above statements about grabbing some ‘Dark chocolate’ or ‘have Indian- less sugar’ mean you haven’t ‘quit’ sugar?

    Don’t get me wrong, I was thinking it was a superhuman skill to be able to say no to sugar completely given how many unlikely foods still contain some, but I was surprised and more curious than accusing- can we ‘quit’ sugar but still have it rarely and not ruin the benefits of ‘giving it up’…

    [Reply]

    Brittany Reply:

    I second this question. I’m fine until I start having ‘tiny’ amounts of sugar, and it all goes out the window ;)

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  • Jason

    I’m sure most chefs would see nutritionists as a complete pain in the arse. Menus are designed for a reason. It’s their art. I do find it a little disrespectful to start pulling apart menu items to suit yourself. Sauce on the side? Only cooked with garlic? Jesus! If you don’t like the dish, don’t order it. Don’t start messing around with chefs creations. It’s very personal to them.

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  • sarah

    I have too many food intolerances to eat out. I pack my own food everyday, which is annoying but it is definitely healthier and I know exactly what’s in it

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    mum of four Reply:

    I am exactly the same Sarah! Although with four kids, that means five bottles of water to be filled from home and five lots of everything… drives me mad sometimes but I am glad that I take the time to make the effort, particularly when I see the poor nutritional choices on offer EVERYWHERE, not to mention the prices…

    [Reply]

    Miranda Reply:

    Agree Sarah. I too have same issue. Sometimes i just think it would all be so much easier, and sometimes more social, to just ‘suck it up’ and try to eat out, but with all of the intolerances I have, trying to work out what I could/couldn’t eat just takes up too much energy and time wasted. Time that is better spent just organising something for myself from home – that way no possible dire outcomes. I always make sure that i have something with me so as never to find myself in a situation where I have nothing to eat. And you know what, on the bright side it’s cheaper too – money wise and health wise!

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    sarah Reply:

    Glad I’m not alone!
    It does suck not being able to eat out with friends, but I don’t want to end up on the toilet all night…

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  • Alex

    Grill’d for sure – has set a new benchmark for fast food standards (great fresh produce and very lean meat). And their chips are fantastic.

    I steer clear of foodcourts. Never know how long the food has been sitting there and perhaps you should check out the kind of ‘meat’ they use for kebabs. Californian rolls are conveniant yet the mayonaise is high is sugar.

    I also eat at Spud Bar (know they’re in Melbourne but not sure where else). A very filling meal and healthy option (depending on what toppings your choose).

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  • Alex

    Just on kebabs:

    The doner kebab, one of Turkey’s national dishes, has always been regarded as a meal that is on the healthy side. Recently, scientists in the UK have discovered that the popular take-out food has one of the most highest counts of fat content amongst any type of fast food. While no take-out food was measured as healthy, the doner kebab was deemed the worst of the worst.

    Tests done on the doner kebab in the UK revealed that the kebab contains 1,000 calories of cooking oil, or what would be equivalent to a wine glass. The fat content ranged from 111 grams to 140 grams which is over twice the fat content that a woman should have daily. More striking was the discovery that if a person were to eat two doner kebabs a week they would be more than likely to suffer from a heart attack within ten years. This is particularly bad for a person whose diet already consists of foods high in fat.

    So is it really a ‘healthy option’?

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    I’m also a bit confused why falafel is a healthy option. It’s deep fried. I know the spices can be healthy but do they still contain the nutrition after 4 minutes in the deep fry?

    [Reply]

    Stephanie Reply:

    I’m no expert, but felafel is made of chick peas. If oil is hot enough, the cooked stuff shouldn’t absorb that much of it. But of course the caveat is that the oil should be clean, of high-quality, and heated to a sufficient temperature!

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    Jason Reply:

    Thanks for that Steph. Because the chick peas are crushed, I was thinking that they would absorb more oil. I love felafel and always wondered just how healthy they really are.

    Stephanie Reply:

    I really don’t know, to be sure, but that’s my understanding of the frying process. :)

  • Casey

    Hmmm…being vegetarian, I would always choose a salad at a food court over anything else. I have no trouble with gluten so sometimes I’d have vegetarian sushi at a food court. I’m surprised a bit by how much ‘healthy eating’ when out seems to rely n eating the meat…which obviously I can’t/won’t. Also, I would have thought that the meat in those food courts would be something to avoid like the plague – who knows how long it’s been sitting there and at what temperature? So what’s left? Why is a salad so bad? Is it the salad, or the dressing?

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  • Fiona

    I’m kind of surprised you opt for meat because I feel like non-organic meat is chock-full of hormones and bad stuff. Not judging–I just would have expected different choices.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Hi Fiona – and others who’ve asked about the meat position. VERY good points and I’ve thought about it. But end of day we all do what we need to. My attitude to everything is that I do my best (ethically environmentally health-wise) as often as I can and then make exceptions in order to get on with my life. I’ve read a bit on this – Nina Planck discusses it in her Real Food book – that in regards to meat, this approach (eating the non grass fed etc meat) is actually the best option of a bad bunch. From an enviro POV too.
    But each to their own.
    From a health POV, if our bodies are in good condition from eating well most of the time, they can process the toxins quite effortlessly. No big deal.

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    You make some really good points Sarah. I really appreciate your thoughts and advice!

    [Reply]

  • Fiona

    And other people mentioned the factory slaughterhouses, which is a good point, too. Some of these choices (overall, not just yours!) strike me as odd, but it’s interesting to know what people order!

    [Reply]

  • Rosie

    It’s still a bit of trial and error with me. While I have tried to do more “protein” (minus eggs or dairy as I’m intolerant to these) and a salad or vegetables when eating out, I now think that a vegetarian or maybe a fish or even a rice dish might be a better option. I’ve ordered chicken in the past but as others have mentioned, unless you know that it’s organic or free range then I’m thinking it’s really not the best option.

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  • Monkey Mia

    My entire trip across America I pretty much lived on bacon and eggs, plain salad, and steak. I actually rather liked it, although it was frustrating at the time. I swear that most Texans think gluten is some kind of industrial glue. They had no concept of, Im actually allergic to this stuff, it will hurt me badly if I eat it.

    Im surprised at the judgemental comments here though. Fair enough you want to make good choices at home, but travelling is a lot harder. If eating some non-organically-fed, not-free-range chicken when your only other choices are Big Mac or starve, then shit happens. Dont let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    Understand your comments Mia. I’m not judging here but speaking for myself, if there is another option to non-organic/free-range meat when travelling then I’ll take it.

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    Maria Hannaford Reply:

    ‘Judgemental’ certainly wasn’t what I was going for either. I made the decision to not support that sort of farming, so I choose to avoid those meats where I can, that’s it. Entitled to say it, and hope that others might take it on board where/when they can also, if they want to. Not saying it’s always easy either. It’s bloody hard! I often end up walking around for ages umming and ahhing over what to eat.

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    Monkey Mia Reply:

    Sorry… maybe “judgemental” was a little harsh a word. Its not always possible to be perfect, was what I was trying to say. My point was more to cut yourself some slack, do the best you can, and then pick up your great eating again tomorrow WITHOUT giving yourself a guilt trip over it. There are worse things that could happen to you than eating some slightly impure food when it’s your only choice.

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    Rosie Reply:

    That’s cool Mia I do get what you’re saying. And yep I try to do the best with the options I have and sometimes that means the chicken. At the end of the day my seletions aren’t always perfect or the best for me but I live ‘n learn… :-)

    [Reply]

    Monkey Mia Reply:

    Oh man, some of the “best options” while road tripping through America would make your skin crawl! I think some of it was plasticine injected with food colouring to look like food. It would have had a shelf life of a trillion years and survived nuclear war. Although I did get to eat scorpion once in a little roadhouse off Route 66, which was cool. Travel is so worth it but the digestive/ nutritional issues it raises are less than pretty.

    Rosie Reply:

    Eeeuwww on both counts Mia!! Yes, travel is great but I’d pack a gluten free muslie bar! I’m not quite so adventurous… (nor is my stomach) and I mean that in a nice way… each to their own!

    Stephanie Reply:

    I had to laugh at your last comment Mia, because it reminded me of being a kid and travelling across the US. I’m Canadian, and the big thing that we noticed when we crossed the border was all of the choice in the supermarkets. Where we would have had five or six types of potato chips available in the store (not that we were regular potato chip eaters – mom was very strict), in the US there were whole aisles of the stuff. I remember that my brothers were particularly fascinated by the aerosol cheese that one could buy. The food industry in the US is really something. It’s not that we don’t have crap here. We do. But the US raises the bar on industrial food, beyond a level understandable by an ordinary human mind. I lived in Australia for two years in the 1990s and one of the pleasant surprises was actually how much good food was available in cafes and the like – much better than at home, in part because we have to import everything given our short growing season.

    [Reply]

    Monkey Mia Reply:

    Thanks Stephanie, good to know its not just me! Some places I didn’t have access to even a supermarket, especially in the middle of the desert, just fast food and gas stations… oh man. That was interesting.

    The other problem with the USA is the FDA and its ridiculous laws! I’m used to Australia which has some of the strictest food labelling laws in the world, so a celiac can pick up a product and actually have a vague idea what’s in it they could be allergic to. No such luck in the USA!

    [Reply]

    Stephanie Reply:

    Good point about the food labelling. I think they’ve been working on improving that in the US, but I really don’t know at this point. I haven’t been there in a while. I take your point about the fast food and gas stations!

  • Jan

    I avoid food courts like the plague. Mainly for sanitation issues listed above, but they are such a rip off. Seriously, $10 for a bread roll with a bit of salad thrown in!!

    Instead, I will either look for a local bakery or shop at a supermarket (lot’s of convenient and healthy food options) at a fraction of the cost.

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  • Andrew

    When I look at all the breakfast ideas – eggs, avocado, mushrooms etc – all of them are missing the one necessary requirement: a unifying piece of toasted sourdough. I will never believe that fatty bacon will be better for you than a fine piece of bread.

    [Reply]

    Heather Reply:

    Here here Andrew!!

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    Monkey Mia Reply:

    Depends. There is nothing in bread that has any nutrition whatsoever once its been bleached, plus it has gluten and a lot of antinutrients that will rip your gut to shreds, AND it has a high glycemic load and will spike your insulin. Lot of downsides/ useless junk carbs for no real benefit.

    Bacon has protein and fat, both of which your body needs. Granted, probably TOO much fat once its been fried on a fast food grill, and there are those pesky nitrates as well. But in terms of what is better for you, bacon has some nutrition in it. Bread doesn’t.

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  • Kate

    Most salad and sandwich bars offer plenty variety’s of bread. I’d much rather have a salad sandwich on rye than anything else you find in a food court. And you can always get a salad without any dressings, which has got to be healthier than a kebab.

    [Reply]

  • http://thebeautifulsoup.com Tara

    I’m vegetarian, so sadly many of the meal options chosen above are out for me.
    Often the token Vego dish on the menu is pasta. Grrrrrrrrrr! Although Asian restaurants are great.
    I can’t handle salad as a meal without some form of added protein, I still feel hungry after.

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  • picardie.girl

    Thank you Sarah, I often feel inadequate when reading your food posts and all the comments from nutritionally superior eaters – sometimes it really feels like a competition and who can ‘out-health’ the others.

    So I really like to hear that you do occasionally eat food in less controlled environments, and that it’s ok to do so. I know I don’t need anyone’s permission, but I’ll feel better about it if I know that nutritional purists also do it sometimes.

    Bless you for being real and unafraid to shine a light on the less-than-perfect bits of life.

    [Reply]

  • Katy @ http://katyrunner.blogspot.com/

    This might just be me, but I’ll often try to find a supermarket or even a corner store and buy some fruit, cheese, vitaweats, even some milk or nuts or whole vegies (eg carrots etc).

    You can usually make a little takeaway picnic for the price of a food court meal (less if sharing). Same deal if I”m driving somewhere – in fact, my husband and I keep a picnic set in our boot for this very reason.

    We do it more to save cash, but I think it’d be a fairly healthy option as well. Usually where there’s a foodcourt there’s a supermarket.

    Sometimes though it’s just nice to treat ourselves to takeout food. If so, we just treat ourselves and try not to overanalyse it. Because it really is only ‘sometimes’ food, it seems to work well for us.

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  • Mia

    I’m off to Hawaii shortly for a holidy and plan on enjoying every meal & treat. Probably one of the worst places to go foodwise, but I spend about 48 weeks of the year making sure I eat correctly so have given myself permission to live and let live (even if this means buying a muumuu to travel home comfortably! LOL)

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    Mia Reply:

    And Sarah, how much does your e-book cost?

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  • Karen

    What about grilled fish with or without the chips and tartare/tomato sauce? Pretty healthy I’d say.

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    Grilled fish from the fish and chip shop contains almost as much oil as deep fried apparently. If you watch them cook the fish, you will notice that a ladel of oil will be placed on the hot plate to cook the fish. When the fish is flipped over, more oil is added. Remember that grilled fish isn’t actually cooked on a grill.

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  • H. Rose

    My dad is a truck driver, and I feel terrible thinking how much unhealthy food he is eating. Do you have any personal preferences for someone with a crazy schedule for meals? Things that are fast but healthy? This has really been on my mind lately. I mean, tons of people have certain jobs that make eating healthy a really hard deal. All he could eat would be from restaurants! The entire time he’s gone, too!

    [Reply]

    Belle Reply:

    You can buy 12volt ovens for trucks (they look like a shoebox) from Dick Smith or places like that. My partner is a truck driver and used to buy all his meals from roadhouses until we bought one of these. Now I make up meals for him to take which he just pops in the oven about an hour from pulling up for the night and he has a hot meal ready to eat. You can buy foil containers with lids from Woolies which fit in the oven perfectly and I just cook up a big curry or shepherds pie or stirfry, fill the containers and freeze until he needs them.

    So now we go shopping before he leaves for the week and buy nuts, dried fruit, crackers, vegemite etc to snack on and he takes his meals for dinner. It saves an absolute fortune and because I make the meals from scratch I know what’s in them.

    Sometimes he takes ceral and milk with him as well, or stuff to make sandwiches. Theres heaps of ways to get your dad eating more healthy but it does involve a bit of organisation.

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    Hi Sarah,

    I don’t know if it’s just me (and I apologise for commenting out of context in this particular thread) but I can’t seem to get the shopping cart to ‘transact’ when purchasing your I quit sugar e-book, i.e. it won’t let me purchase it…. Is anyone else having this problem?

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Kate, someone’s been in touch, I know…but maybe try the tip below and try again. I sometimes have to coax paypal ! Sing out – info@sarahwilson.com.au if you have further problems.

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  • http://fattyfintoskinnyminnie.blogspot.com/ Adalita

    I had that problem – it was a problem with Paypal. it kept changing my email to have a %40 instead of the @ symbol. I just kept trying it worked eventually.

    Sarah your book looks good of the page I have read. I will read the rest today. Thanks so much. It will help me get back to my goal weight.

    [Reply]

  • Sara

    Sarah, your e-book is fantastic. Looking forward to the 8 week challenge.

    Can I just ask if you say to quit most fruits (with the odd exception), why is there a picture of you holding a lemon? Surely lemon have a high sugar content?

    [Reply]

  • http://womanincredible.com Kat Eden

    Love Nat’s idea of making your own antipasto platter at a salad bar!

    Thanks for including me Sarah; great to see how others make do when out and about.

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  • UK

    Curious to see how many people that follow Sarah’s blog and are very into nutrition and other health aspects, drink alcohol?

    Just wondering… xx

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  • http://www.jennyblume.com.au Jenny Blume

    Nothing wrong with the odd wine … as they say, all things in moderation.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/AngesNutrition Ange

    It all comes down to the 80:20 rule, do yourself well for 80% of the time and use the other 20% for times where there are no other choices.
    McDonalds also spray their Angus burgers with MSG, that way they can get away with saying it is 100% beef – because it is before they begin cooking it! Nice one McDonalds!

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