Well, my I Quit Sugar ebook has been on sale now for 3 weeks. So, there’s a bunch of you who’ve already seen results.

Here’s some of what you’ve been saying:

“I can’t believe how many tasty foods there are that don’t have any sugar!” Kerry

“I’m in week 3 of I Quit Sugar – feeling really good and skin is clearer and brighter, whoo!” Jasmine

“I have been sugar free for five days now. I am starting to experience that clarity that you and so many others have talked about, and it is a nice place to be – instead of thinking about chocolate and biscuits all the time!” Sally

One of the main tricks I share for quitting sugar is to get used to using other sweeteners (but only healthy ones). In I Quit Sugar, I share recipes and supply a shopping list of things to keep in your cupboard. Funnily, Huffington Post recently ran a list of simiilar sweeteners, some of which I’ve included here…

  • crushed berries…instead of jam. Crush some fresh or frozen berries (perhaps with a little stevia; I find frozen ones work) and spread on toast.
  • vanilla powder… with yoghurt instead of icecream. In my ebook I share other tips, including where to buy the stuff.
  • cinnamon…instead of sugar in your coffee. Try adding a dash of it to coffee as it brews. Toss it into the french press or coffee maker and let it infuse into the grinds.
  • coconut flesh and flakes...to sweeten porridge.
  • licorice root tea…in chocolate treats and baked things. A small teaspoon of the root (ie not after it’s made up into tea) adds instant sweetness.
  • almond milk. The bought stuff is usually full of added sugar. Which is dumb because it really doesn’t need it. “Because of their sweet tasting oil (almonds) can trick our taste buds into thinking sugar’s present. Add it to tea as well as smoothies and you’ll likely use far less sweetener.” Oh, here’s how to make your own.

If you haven’t checked out the I Quit Sugar ebook…you can buy it here:

  • coconut oil.…as a snack after lunch. As Huffington Post writes, the mind makes such a strong “sweet” association with the scent of coconut, that even when there is no sugar present (like in the coconut oil) the mouth senses “sweet”. Look for the pure, virgin kind sold at most health oriented stores. I literally scoop it straight from the jar for an after lunch treat. I’ll post on this in the future. (see below for Huff Post’s spinach and sweet potato recipe cooked with coconut oil)
  • cook onion…to sweeten pasta sauces. I love this tip: Many savory foods have loads of sugar added. This is especially true for foods with a tomato base due to tomato’s acidity. Sweeten with LOTS of cooked onion instead. Let them caramelize on the stove top until they’re deeply golden, their sugar oozing out…
  • apple sauce...to sweeten muffins. Apples still contain fructose, but in moderation they’re fine and can substitute for sugar in muffins etc. Huff Post advises cutting back a little on the liquid, and/or add a few minutes to the baking time, and go 1:1 with the sugar to apple sauce substitution.
  • roast vegetables...instead of dessert. Eat the roasted vegs at the end of the meal and you will be far less in need of a sweet. The most dessert-like ones: sweet potato, squash, beets and carrots.

Spinach, Chickpeas and Sweet Potato

  • Sweet potato (Roasted)
  • Coconut oil
  • 2  large cloves garlic
  • 1/2 onion
  • 1/2 tin of chickpeas
  • Fresh spinach (Frozen if it’s hard to get your hands on fresh)
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk (You barely notice the coconut milk since it’s really just an accent, but you could always use broth if you’re not into coconut or if want it to be even lighter.)
  • Harissa spice** (A dash of Cajun spice will also do, which then makes it Springtime in New Orleans)
  • Salt

Chop up and roast a whole sweet potato. If you’re doing it on the stove top, dice it fairly finely so it will cook quickly (do not remove the skin). Heat the oil and when it’s very hot, add the sweet potato. Once it’s nicely browned (the oil must be very hot so it will brown), turn the heat way down, cover it and let it cook about 10 minutes. (Use this basic technique for roasting ALL vegs on the stove top). Remove from pan.  In same pan sautee the garlic and onion adding a little more oil as necessary. Add chickpeas and with a fork, in the pan, crush most of the chickpeas leaving only a few whole. Then add the coconut milk, then spinach (don’t skimp here as it wilts down to nothing), spices and salt. Stir just until the spinach has wilted. Add the sweet potato back in.  It will keep for several days, so make lots.

What do you do to sweeten up your foods? Any tips you’d like to share?

 

Have your say, leave a comment.

  • Alex

    I am in week four of the I quit sugar 8 week program… and have just found out that carob is 50% fructose! I have been eating it every day this last week to try an replace my chocolate cravings. I wondered why I wasn’t able to stop eating it… and was craving more! I guess it’s just like eating sweetened chocolate. I am a bit disheartened… I thought I was doing really well!!! I guess the idea that carob is a ‘healthy option’ is one of those myths that I grew up with. The carob product I have been eating has no added sugar or other sugar products- so looks good… but this evening when I looked at the little box on the packet I see that it states that the product has 33.7g of sugar per 100g. Sarah- I wonder if you would mention this potential pitfall in your book… ?