how is the quitting sugar thing going for you?

Posted on October 28th, 2011

I’d love your thoughts…it’s been almost four weeks since I released the I Quit Sugar ebook and I was just wondering how you’ve been finding it.

And just a cute photo my friend Jo Immig took out her kitchen window up here in the Byron hinterland

Any questions?

Any results? Please do feel free to share.

Fellow bloggers, is the affiliates program working for you?

From my end, it’s been so heartening to see how many people have got stuck into the program. If you haven’t checked out the book yet, do so here.

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  • Renae

    Hi Sarah!

    I am in week 2 of Quitting Sugar and so far, am doing ok, only a few cravings but like you said, the cheese really helps and fills you up! I also made those nut balls – delish!

    I do have a couple of questions…I can’t drink milk (dairy) so drink Soy Milk, I only really have it in small amounts in my coffee or tea. I noticed you mentioned to stay away from Soy? I did however, find an organic soy milk that is malt free and only 1g sugar per 100ml, do you think this would be ok? am going into week 3 and want to do it right! Also, just so I am clear on this…week three…can you still have foods with sugar under 6g? Or do you have to cut everything out completely? Can you have the alternative sugars in this phase also? Sorry for all the questions!!

    Thank you so much for your e-book! I suffer from IBS and since I started this 2 weeks ago, I have noticed I am nowhere near as bloated as I was before, and I am feeling great :) love your work!

    Renae

    [Reply]

    Ivy Reply:

    Could you try rice or almond milk instead?

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    Renae Reply:

    I used to drink rice milk but it isn’t the same consistency as soy, it’s quite watery and contains quite a bit of sugar, but thanks for the suggestion!

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    Renae Reply:

    I could perhaps try to make my own almond milk, just seems time consuming!

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    mel Reply:

    try it renae, i thought the same but i make about a litre every three days and its so so easy. i just soak whatever nuts i have over night then whizz it up first thing in the morning. i use a blue chux to strain. check out the cute simple video on ‘my new roots’ blog on the easiest way. and its so nice no sweeteners. I’ve been doing a hazelnut, macadamia, brazil nut blend. and if you want it thicker i guess just use less water. you can use the pulp too for cooking.

    Roq Reply:

    It doesn’t have to be time consuming. Just use almond butter instead of whole almonds :-) There are different brands though so you have to make sure it’s not a brand that adds a lot of oil. I like Biona. There is oil floating on top so you can decide whether you use it or discard it.

    Emma Reply:

    Hi Renae

    You could try Goats Milk. It has a different protein to cows milk and often those with cows milk allergies/intolerances can digest goats. It is also a whole food. I often recommend it for my clients, and with great results.

    Emma

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    Emma Reply:

    p.s. a great article: http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=38646

    Of course if you have a “true” allergy to dairy, then goats milk won’t be a good substitute.

    [Reply]

    red Reply:

    Hi Renee, try the chickpea protein enriched rice milk by vitasoy in the green packaging, it’s nice and thick goes great in naughty things like coffee and tea. I don’t touch the other stuff it is like water like you said.

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  • Stellaaaaaarrr

    Hi Sarah!

    It’s going great guns for me. I’ve been sugar free for a few weeks now and I’m loving that I feel much less puffy and bloated, much less moody and much clearer in my head.

    Yesterday I decided to try the raw cocoa nibs (it’s nearly period time) and for the rest of the day I was wanting to eat everything in sight! I notice that they have sugar in them so I’m not sure if this is why? They aren’t the sweetened ones, just plain and raw.

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  • sweet enough

    Hi Sarah,

    I’ve been sugar free now for 4 weeks after buying your book and David Gillespie’s books, Sweet Poison.

    I didn’t really believe it would make much difference to me but I’ve definitely seen a change. I haven’t lost any weight, but I am not as hungry all the time, I don’t crave sugar or sweet things, I feel less bloated.

    I’m not drinking all the time (soft drink, juice etc) and focus less on ‘what’s to eat next?’

    I think I have compensated for the lack of sweets with a bit more high-fat foods but now that I’m moving further down the track, I suspect this will slow down as well.

    Thanks for putting it all into an e-book – so easy to read and pretty too!

    [Reply]

    Trish Reply:

    I’ve been sugar-free for a year now (after reading David Gillespie’s book Sweet Poison) and the 8 kilos I lost in that time has not come back. I eat everything else, including more high fat foods, particularly butter.
    I was worried that it would affect my cholesterol levels, so I had a blood test, and after a year of not worrying about the fat content of foods, it was 3.3 (with the good cholesterol high and the bad cholesterol low)! I now agree with David that sugar is the problem not fat!!!!
    The blood test also measured my risk of cardio-vascular disease, and I was on the low end of the scale for all the markers used. So apparently going sugar-free is more healthy than we have been led to believe (and I’m finding it so easy to maintain, as I have completely lost my taste for it, except for a couple of pieces of fruit per day).

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  • Nicole

    I’ve been sugar free for well over 6 months now. I’ve never been a biscuit/icecream/cake eater, but what I really struggled to give up, (because I LOVED them) were:

    -natural muesli with dried fruit/bircher soaked in apple juice/sweet yoghurt
    -pre-made salads from local cafes which have dressings which are most definitely NOT sugar free
    -copious amounts of fruit (i.e a mango, big bunch of grapes, several stone fruits and an apple or two, all in one day.)

    I now make my own natural muesli mix – oats, mixed chopped nuts, pepitas, shredded coconut, sprinkled with blueberries. I also make my own bircher by soaking oats overnight in coconut water, then adding mixed nuts, seeds, shredded coconut, some grated green apple, Greek yoghurt and a few berries.
    I just steer clear of bought salads (and happily saving a little money because of it).
    I also limit my daily fruit intake to two serves a day, which usually consists of blueberries, strawberries, green apples and pears.

    My skin, which has always looked dull and tired is now glowy and I rarely breakout, I never feel bloated and feel REALLY energised.

    Through the process of going sugar free I’ve discovered so many fabulous foods… raw cacao nibs/powder, coconut oil, full fat un-homogenised milk, I flavour my cooking with spices, spices and more spices and am using so many more fresh herbs…

    It’s really been a total lifestyle change that has worked SO WELL for me… Thanks for all the information and support :)

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    hey! i’m on my third week and i cannot believe (!!) how easy i am finding it. i do have those days where i would kill for a croissant sure, though overall i am loving it. i made those bliss balls you posted not so long ago, they are great! for a change it’s really great knowing that what i’m putting into my body is good for me. in addition to feeling good about that, i’ve noticed my energy levels have sky rocketed! all in all i’m feeling fantastic, i wanted to say a MASSIVE thank you for being an inspiration to me. it’s really reassuring knowing that you’re not alone in the quest for happiness and self satisfaction. whether it be through riding your bike to work through the speedy streets of sydney, or eliminating sugar from a pretty shitty diet!

    so thanks, you are helping us all probably more than you know! lisa

    [Reply]

    Jo Reply:

    Woolworths croissants have less than 5g sugar per 100g so I buy those occasionally. They also only have about 5 ingredients and are not full of preservatives/who knows what else they put into the usual Coles/Woolworths fare.

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  • http://econest.blogspot.com/ Maria Hannaford

    I quit sugar almost two months ago. Cold turkey. Challenging for a week or so but then I felt so much better that it was easy peasy. Seriously Sarah, IT HAS COMPLETELY CHANGED ME. I used to feel hypo every single day if i didn’t eat every couple of hours. Cranky, dizzy, blurry. I hated it. I don’t get those feelings AT ALL anymore. AT ALL. I’ve completely broken my addiction to the sweet stuff. Before, a block of chocolate in the house wouldn’t last three days. After, we’ve had a block sitting in the pantry for two months. I don’t even FEEL like eating any. Give me a piece of cake and I’ll happily decline. Seriously changed my life.

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  • Mrs Bok

    Hi Sarah, I bought your ebook but don’t know how to access it! Will it email through to me? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    You would have received it as soon as you paid – it would have come up as a link that you download…if you have further issues, email info@sarahwilson.com.au and Jo will assist you. x

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    anne Reply:

    I had the same problem (being computer illiterate probably doesnt help)…I am fortunate that I printed it off before I lost it because I certainly havent been able to find it since which is a bit annoying because there were some links that I was going to have a look at. Oh well, never mind…

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  • Jess

    Sarah,

    It has been so good – I’m week 3 and feel less bloated and more alert. I have so much more awareness of what is in food and am enjoying looking for new recipies with the knowledge of what is good for me and the hidden sugars. I’ve dropped 1 kg without effort.

    However…. I momentarily forgot this morning and had an egg and bacon roll – I feel so sick now. Interesting how fast my body has taken on the change.

    Thanks for all the information on this topic.

    Jess

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  • http://www.sugariffic.wordpress.com Lara

    After 28 days, I am feeling a lot more in control of what I eat. Things I previously used to snack on now seem inedible to me – lollies, biscuits etc. I’m so much more aware of hidden sugar, which I think is going to make a big difference going forward. My cravings have changed. Instead of wanting a sweet snack at 3pm, I find myself seeking out nuts, and proteins. Dessert menus at restaurants are ignored with ease as I prefer to finish meals on a savoury note.
    Will I stay off all sugar for life? I don’t think so. Pieces of fruit and the occassional piece of birthday cake will surely sneak its way back, but to have a better awareness and understanding of its dangers has already made a huge difference to my diet.

    [Reply]

    Trish Reply:

    A couple of pieces of fruit a day are fine, but I’d stay away from the birthday cake if I were you. I decided to try a few sweet things last Christmas (having been sugar-free for 6 months at the time) and developed the cravings all over again. I then had to start the detox from scratch.
    I’m now convinced that you can effortlessly stay sugar-free if you don’t give your body a big hit of sugar again. An occasional spoonful of sugar in a cappuccino doesn’t seem to upset the balance, but I wouldn’t push my luck with anything too rich.

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    Mel Reply:

    Agree, was sugar free for a year had a bit of birthday cake with full on creamy sugary icing and lost control for ages. The icing just triggered the sugar search.

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    jan Reply:

    I wonder how much losing control is to do with being too rigid and not letting yourself ever have a treat? The human brain is geared to want what we are told we can’t have, even if it is you telling yourself that you are not allowed to have something. Then when you do break out it’s full steam ahead. I fully understand the grip of the sugar demon but don’t know how much is psychological and how much is physical? Or maybe it’s a combination of both, what do you think?

  • Ktjane

    I am 4 weeks in, it’s going great. I’ve never eaten so much (good) fat in my life! I would say I’m about 15 kilos overweight, and have been all my life. And while I haven’t lost any weight, yet, I’ve noticed my hunger and constant food craving diminish greatly. I am still having about one srve of fruit per day(handful of berries), so possibly that is why no weight loss. Last week I thought I’d try cutting down other carbs, but as per usual it made me very agitated and grumpy- so I might leave that until after Christmas, while staying sugar free.
    The ability to decline sugary food is the biggest freedom. I used to feel like it was calling me from the pantry- it was irresistible! So the only option was to not have any in the house- my poor kids and husband!! But now I can have it there (chocolate, Anzac biscuits, lollies etc) and feel indifferent. In control. So nice.
    I don’t feel ready to try sugar yet, maybe in couple of weeks.
    Thank you Sarah -the ebook is great.

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  • mel

    i can’t believe that in 2 weeks my sugar “switch” has been completely turned off. if i wasn’t constantly eating something sweet i would definantely get that pang of wanting if i saw anything sweet. i never get it now. when i see cakes, biscuits etc i just feel no connection and i have noticed a huge weightloss but i have also cut out grains and just eating when hungry. I am so much happier, still feeling a little lethargic. The ‘carb flu’ I’ve heard. great to hear how everyone else is going. i was the biggest sugar addict, so if i can everybody can.

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  • Kamina

    Hi Sarah,
    Firstly thank you so much for your book, I related to many of your symptoms. I am on day two, so still very early days for me. Yesterday I had a full-fat flat white with NO sugar – I have always added sugar to my coffee and I’ve NEVER tasted a coffee without sugar… there’s no going back now!
    I am very, very curious to see how my body responds without sugar. I have been doing IVF since June this year with no luck. My acupuncturist advised me a while ago to try to give up sugary food to get my blood sugar levels on track – apparently this has a huge effect on fertility, who knew? So your book is very timely for me.
    Thank you, thank you, thank you! x

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  • http://www.queensix.com.au James

    I quit sugar a few weeks back and after some withdrawl symptoms at about the 1 week mark I noticed a huge change in the way I felt.

    I used to be exhausted after eating and feel like I needed to lie down. Now, I feel energised after eating. I’ve even found that if I need to force my body to stay awake I can do it by eating something like unsweetened organic peanut butter. This is totally opposite to before! I also feel much clearer in my mind.

    I’m eating less, but still have the odd binge so don’t really seem to be loosing belly fat.

    I’m finding that if i’m not craving sugar i’m craving salt, and salt is in even more things than sugar!!

    I’m positive that if I cut out most salt as well that I would eat less again and begin to lose weight but that might be a challenge too far.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    James – can you email me at jo@sarahwilson.com.au ?? Would love to ask you a question!
    Jo

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  • Kat

    Hi Sarah,

    So far, so good. Of course, I’ve had a few ‘cheat’ moments – a Mint Slice here, a lick of tomato sauce there. Though they tasted so strange that I didn’t want anymore (anyone noticed how weird tomato sauce tastes after going off sugar?)

    It hasn’t been too hard, as I’ve followed a lot of your snack tips. My biggest challenge is finding sugar-free lunch ideas for work. I’m getting tired of my standard ‘blah’ salads. Anyone have some yummy suggestions?

    The Berry Radical drink gets me through the arvo slump – many thanks for the recommendation!

    I am a little worried about the amount of fat I’m now eating – cheese, full-fat milk, bacon and eggs seem to be staples in my diet now. Should I be concerned?

    [Reply]

  • Kat

    Oh, and, the most fabulous thing about going off sugar? My ‘poonch’ has disappeared! My stomach is virtually flat – woohoo!

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    lindsey Reply:

    Hahah that is the best thing about it!!!! :))

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  • Deanne

    Thanks so much for the Quit Sugar book Sarah – I skipped week 1 and onto week 5 – this has been the hardest for me….lots of cravings especially at night and Ihave to say i’ve weakened on occasion but my saviour is the licorice tea – love it for sweet cravings. haven’t lost any weight i think, but as Kat above says, am eating more things like cheese and eggs which is a bit of concern re cholesterol but try to outweight that by eating avocado.
    Thanks, Deanne

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  • Nadia

    I only just started this week. Already the bloating is gone and I feel a lot more clear headed.

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  • Jasmin

    I’m in week 4 and i’m amazed by the changes so far, I hardly have anymore headaches, I’m not craving sugar or any crap food actually, people have commented on me losing weight, my afternoon slump is pretty much gone so I’m so happy and grateful Sarah, I have been surrounded by cakes and sweets etc this past week and for the first time in my life it wasn’t an issue for me, I didn’t want any and I was happy not to have any so that’s pretty amazing, this is def something I want to keep continuing on with so THANK YOU!!!!

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  • Naomi

    I’ve just commenced week 2, and despite some cravings I’m really loving it. Quitting sugar has really made me aware of other taste sensation. I had some jalna natural yoghurt last night and it was a satisfying, sweet treat!! Usually, I’d find it sour and hard to eat. It was delicious but not like sugary ones where I could go back for more. It’s taking me hours to do the shopping as I scan packets for nutritional info! QUESTION: why do u stay away from sunflower oil? I bought some oat milk, and it has that and inulin in it… I’d like to know what the deal is with that?

    Already I feel healthier and this feels like a much more human way to eat. (I’m blogging about my journey at http://www.sugarfreeme-Naomi.blogger.com)

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  • Ruby

    Hi Sarah,

    So far so good-although, Im a little concerned at how much fat Im eating to replace the sugar. Approx 85 grams per day! Is that an issue? Should I cut back? Its from oils/nuts/seeds/cheese, but still, its seems like lot doesnt it?

    R

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Stop counting the grams…you body will naturally tell you if it’s full when you eat fat. I think that will help. Relax a little. Also, if you’re not eating sugar, the fat will metabolise well. Fat turns to fat in the presence of sugar.

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    Ruby Reply:

    Thanks! You’re probably right. I will keep up the experiment!

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  • http://www.sosensational.com.au Sania

    Hi Sarah,

    I can’t thank you enough for this little gem! mid way through week 2 I haven’t found it difficult at all. I was a 2 sugars in my coffee/tea gal and I had at 3-4 of these each day. Read your book in one sitting and went out and got David Gillespie’s book Sweet poison the next day.

    I’ve got more energy, sleeping better, lost 2.5 kilos in the first week!
    Cravings haven’t been too bad, Stevia helps and Just love coconut water! that has been great to curb cravings. Knowing what sugar does to your body, I’ve made a complete 360 on my eating habits and has made it really easy.

    I have wanted to do it for ages so thanks once again for this fabulous little tool!

    I’m noticing how thirsty I am now. I’m drinking a lot more water too.

    [Reply]

  • James

    Sarah!
    Of all the thoughts, the paths, the curiosity that mind of yours explores…
    No fair!

    Sugar is the answer. To everything. Let me elaborate:

    “…I feel pensive. Time for a break and a coffee with Sugar”
    “…Ad break! Just enough time to get a biscuit, Monte’ Carlo. Oh yeah ! – Sugar”
    “…It’s 5pm, day’s almost over. Mmmm? Lemon Slice, oh yeah!…”
    And I could tap away as could most, or am I out of touch?

    I’m sure it’s in your book, the brain runs exclusively on pure clucose. Of course, this can come from many foods but the instant hit is not your complex carbs.

    For me? To take out sugar from my diet the rest of my life, routine, family, the whole 9 yards of that dynamic juggle (that only George Cloony has seemed to find) would have to be unshakable. And the propensity to rival George ain’t lookin good at present!

    But for all that said you stick with it, but pinky promise yeah? When you return to the Sweeter side of life, do let us know. Ha!
    Best Regards
    James Ipikata S.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.queensix.com.au James

    You are a goose James. You can buy pure glucose powder if you have starved yourself and therefore are not getting enough glucose to your brain. In fact, I recommend you go get some now, cause you are definitely running low on brain glucose with that post!

    [Reply]

    James Reply:

    Dearest James,

    This is a happy thread!
    The mirror may not be my friend but I don’t look ‘Goosey’
    In front of one. Raw supplements – enmass – aren’t really the answer as psychotropic compounds usually prefer to be processed by a set (P40) enzymes on the liver. In this case pure glucose supplement will go pretty much straight through the stomach wall – bypassing the liver – leaving the intake thereof kind of unregulated. Of course, there are always exceptions, but not in this case!
    Each to their own, touché cliche’
    Lovely
    All the best
    Now where is that Mars Bar??

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  • Sophie

    It’s going well for me. It was a nice surprise when I began to discover that I had already been doing weeks 1 and 2 for a couple of months and so was already up to week 3. My skin is getting better, I don’t get cravings so often (but I’ve found that just 2 squares of 85% dark chocolate is very satisfying and much better than 15-20 squares of milk chocolate) and I’ve lost a couple of kilos which I couldn’t shift even after almost a year of regular exercise.

    By the way (for Rachel below), all the soy milk that I buy has less sugar than cow’s milk, according to the packet. Maybe it is only high in sugar if it is the sweetened soy?

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    Renae Reply:

    In Sarah’s book I think it says something like the first 4g of sugar in cows milk is lactose and therefor it’s ok? But I have found a few good soy milk varieties with 2g or 1g so surely that is ok in small amounts like in tea/coffee..

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  • Rosie

    I’ve um-ed and ah-ed whether to try this. I haven’t bought the book as yet. It seems that after reading some of the comments, people who have noticed a major difference were those used to having vast quantities of sugar – lots of lollies ‘n chocs. I don’t think I eat all that much (I could be wrong of course), but I was wondering if anyone that’s used to having small amounts of sugar in their diet was noticing a difference?

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    Kat Reply:

    Hi Rosie,

    I wasn’t a huge sugar eater before going on the plan. I’ve always craved more salty/savoury snacks. I’ve still noticed a difference, though. It’s the little things – I used to have a lot of sauces (mainly tomato sauce & sweet chilli) to flavour my meals. Even just cutting these out, as well as ‘snack’ foods, some breads and drinks has given me more energy and flattened my tum. Everyone is different though :) I wonder if not being a big sugar eater actually makes the plan a little easier to follow? I didn’t get any noticeable withdrawal symptoms…

    [Reply]

    Renae Reply:

    Hi,

    I am was in the same boat, I didn’t eat many sweets but it is all the hidden sugar that is the problem! I thought I would give it a go and I have noticed amazing results, give it a go, see how you feel, you don’t have to stick to it if you don’t want to :) By the end of week one, I was much less bloated – my stomach was FLAT!

    [Reply]

    lindsey Reply:

    Definitely in the same position.. I didn’t have much sugar at all.. honey in my oats, little bit of fruit, maybe dark chocolate once in awhile.. but even cutting that out – and just being more AWARE

    Rosie Reply:

    Thanks Kat and Renae for your comments. Wow, that was really interesting to hear! I do have IBS & leaky gut and I feel as though I’m always cutting out one thing or another. Like Kat I’ve always craved savoury stuff, crackers and the like but I find that it’s pretty hard to stop at just a couple (they don’t seem to have sugar in the ingredients) and I’ve had with advocado to keep me full but something keeps me munching away.. Thanks for the tips, I think I will have bite the bullet and just try it myself.

    [Reply]

    Elle G Reply:

    Hi Rosie,
    I considered I ate a very healthy gluten free diet. Only a very occassional muffin, 2 squares of dark chocolate a day, berries for breakfast and one other piece of fruit perhaps through the day. However, I did cook with lots of sauces, even though most of them were additive free. No softdrinks, cordials or juices.
    My weight was going upwards and I could not seem to stop it. I was eating less and less and it was creeping on.
    I went cold turkey off sugar and fructose after reading Sarah’s book and I haven’t missed the sugar at all. And I have lost 2 kgs in the first fortnight and hope to lose another 5.
    I made sure I had snacks that were gluten and sugar free and I think that is one of the secrets in finding it easy.
    Good luck, plan your meals and eat really well

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    lizzymint Reply:

    What sort of snacks? I can’t find anything to fill that hole at morning and afternoon tea and tend to have a slice of GF bread with a smear of banana or butter. Would love to have something easy and quick that’s not a sweet biscuit; but rice crackers don’t quite cut it. What about eating potato chips? I found some non-greasy, salt-free ones from Freedom Foods but still feel a bit ‘guilty’ eating them.

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    Naomi Reply:

    I snack on cups of tea (licorice, peppermint or green) or rice cakes with almond spread. I also cut of a slice of cheese if I need, or crackers are ok too.

  • http://mothernurture.me Lou

    Hi Sarah,
    I’ve loved your eBook and messages and stories on how to cut out sugar. I already have a fairly low sugar diet, but since reading your eBook (in about 32 hours!) I have made a conscious effort to cut back on things like my fruit intake (now only morning and 1 piece on an empty stomach) or my beetroot, ginger and carrot juices (a mid morning ‘treat’). I can’t eat dairy or gluten so it has been a bit of a challenge sometimes but I am finding new ways. The best thing and my saviour has been the coconut. I have coconut milk rice porridge, cook with coconut oil for stirfrys, have toasted coconut sprinkled on sheep’s yoghurt with almonds/ hazelnuts/chia etc, and just last week I have discovered coconut yoghurt “Co Yo” (made in Qld) which is just delicious and soo exciting to have found a non dairy yoghurt option as I love yoghurt and it’s always a bit of a diet staple.
    My big question for you is, and I couldn’t find this in your eBook, is the justification as to why/how coconut is actually good for you? As you know there are many naysayers when you go on a journey such as this and some keep saying to me “but coconut is soo fattening, it’s full of the worst kind of fat, saturated fat”.
    And I understand the principle about fat molecules Vs sucrose so I get it kind of…but do you have have a steadfast argument/answer as to why coconut is ok to consume, and also how this is not justified as a fruit? I think if I was a little more knowledgeable in the subject I would be able to satiate the curiosity/naysayer-ness of my friends!!
    Thanks for sharing your journey and for being so inspiring.

    [Reply]

    Jo Reply:

    A lot of doctors consider that ‘saturated fat is bad for you and fat makes you fat’ a complete untruth. The ‘fat is bad’ message started after a study undertaken by Ancel Keyes about 50 years ago (the 20 countries study (but he only used the data from 7 countries!)). He showed that countries where per capita consumption of fat was highest had the highest incidence of cardiovascular disease. This was the case for the 7 countries mentioned in his study, but if he had used data from the 13 other countries, the results would not have been so clear cut (e.g. traditional Inuit and Masai diets are very high in fat with almost no heart disease at all).

    There is a very interesting video on youtube by Dr Lustig called Sugar- the bitter truth that goes into this and why sugar (fructose), not fat, is the problem. The video has had over a million hits and helps explain the fat thing a bit better.

    Coconut is very high in saturated fat (medium chain fatty acids) which it now seems to be accepted as being good for you. Coconut has no or very little fructose. A lot of fruit, while having no fat, is high in fructose. It’s fructose that is metabolized by the liver and turned immediately into fat circulating in your blood stream and it also seems to turn off your appetite control system (leptin) that tells you that you are full. Fat on the other hand will not do this – when eating it your body will quickly tell you when you’ve had enough.

    Hope this has helped! I used to be a complete ‘low fat’ eater but since March have lost 6kg by cutting out the fructose and not worrying about the fat! And coconut oil is delicious!

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    Lou Reply:

    Thanks Jo! Very interesting about the ‘fat is bad’ message. Found the YouTube Video…I’m going to watch it this weekend. Genius.

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  • Jon

    Hi Sarah.

    I gave up sugar earlier this year after reading your article on David’s book. I’ve just bought the second copy of your book “for a friend”.

    I lost over 20kgs ‘easily’ after giving up the Sweet Poison and haven’t looked back.

    I’m now reading Nora Gedgausas’ book and trying to implement her findings as well. One thing I have found since last Xmas is that there are a lot of people telling anyone who will listen that sugar’s bad, Trans fats are bad, diets are bad, processed foods are bad, etc, etc, but they’re not being listened to.

    I am making it my ‘crusade’ amongst my family and friends, at least, to ‘get it out there’ – whilst being VERY wary of preaching – a very hard line to walk.

    All I can say is thank you for enlightening us to a few of these things and I hope you can keep exposing those listening to all of this information.

    Thanks again,

    Jon

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Best thing to do is “be your message”…sounds like you are.

    [Reply]

  • Cheryl

    Should I avoid bread now that I have quit sugar or is a piece with breakfast OK?

    [Reply]

  • Jo

    Hi Sarah

    I have been sugar free for four weeks with a few stumbles, and a new addiction… HALOUMI!!!!!!!!!

    I carry the book with me everywhere and when I start to feel like something sweet, I flick through the pages as a reminder of what I am doing to my body.

    Thanks Sarah!!!
    Jo

    [Reply]

  • franny:)

    Hi Sarah
    I’ve been going for two weeks now. Used the “just experiment” approach and then just kept going. I like that!! Have lost the craving for sugar now. I surprisingly haven’t lost any weight yet but I am definitely feeling firmer and less bloated. Love the freedom of not having those desperate cravings. I’m making sure I have cut up carrot and cucumber and nuts on hand. I must admit I have just started to put a very little bit honey in my porridge in the mornings. My husband is a beekeeper- how can I not!! Experimenting with stevia too.
    Loved your e-book Sarah. Thankyou

    [Reply]

  • http://www.queensix.com.au James

    James, the whole point IS that pure glucose is not metabolised by the liver! Sugar, with it’s half fructose is metabolised by the liver, just like any other poison (e.g. alcohol). As such it is then converted to fat before being available to the body to use. The result is that you get fat and make your liver work because you are consuming poison!

    Glucose on the other hand is available as instant energy and will be used by your body immediately if it can be, and will only be converted to fat if it can’t be used. Also, unlike the fructose in sugar, it will trigger your appetite system and alert your body that you have consumed energy (so you will not go on over-eating like with sugar).

    Rosie, it makes a huge difference to the way you feel regardless! I’m not fat but I do have some belly fat that i’d like to lose. I haven’t seen major results in that department yet, however I am beginning to consume less. I just went for lunch and ate 3/4 of a sandwich. Before this, I was eating the full sandwich, having sugar in my coffee, and ordering a sugary slice afterwards.

    [Reply]

  • Anne-Marie

    I have been completely sugar free for 6 weeks. I did it slowly to begin with….now no trouble at all; have lost weight. But the big surprise for me has been how good I feel; not just well but happy too; mood swings have gone; nothing seems to upset me now! Though I’ve read both David’s books I also bought yours which is excellent and helped me along.
    now who is going to do the recipe book?? I’d love to ‘have a go’….so may I save and use the recipes you print too. thanks, Sarah, love and laughter to all.

    [Reply]

  • Emma

    Thank you Sarah! I’m recently in remission with Graves and want to do what I can to keep it that way. At week 5, I feel like I have more control and awareness of my body. I didn’t expect to lose weight, because nothing has worked lately, but I dropped 3 kgs (quite an achievement due to my meds). I should add that spend about six hours a week cruising around on my bicycle, except for this last week, when my weight has stabilised. I need to lose more, but I believe in slow and steady. Amazingly, I’m eating the things I always preferred as a kid, before I got told I should be eating fruit and sandwiches (I also avoid gluten now). I don’t often crave the sweet stuff, and find stevia far too sweet. But fresh coconut is amazing, and I’ve been eating a lot of eggs, fresh veg, chickpeas and nuts. The things I miss are the ‘healthy’ sweets like dates, honey and berries. I had a berry smoothie a few days ago, which set me up for a day of cravings, (and also, didn’t fill me up) so I’m going to wait a little longer before reintroducing things.

    [Reply]

  • Mia Bluegirl

    I’m struggling. Anxiety levels through the roof.

    I’d be fascinated to know how anybody else who has previously struggled with addiction (drugs, sex, eating disorders or other compulsive behaviours on that scale) cope with removal of sugar. Although that might be a bit too heavy for this blog…

    [Reply]

    Miss Jodi Reply:

    Hey. I haven’t started on the program yet, but will next week. I don’t eat that much sugar but still want to get rid of it. This might not be the answer for you but the thing that helps me ALL the time. I get anxiety really badly. The one thing I do is make a green tea and have it with half a teaspoon of honey and 2 tea spoons of coconut oil. Yes it’s oily and probably a bit weird. Definately an acquired taste but now I love it and it’s one of the best things I consistently do for myself. I have about 4 or 5 a day. The process of making it is my biggest thing I have a little routine and focus on just making the tea. I have a special cup and spoon. Everything I use is organic and I have a special tea cup too. Just something simple. Keep trying, keep smiling. It’s all good. Best of luck
    :D

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Thanks Miss Jodi… I think I am trying to do too much at once. Hence the anxiety. Gently gently… I always need reminding! Tea sounds like a fabulous idea. xx

    [Reply]

  • Karla

    I’m currently in Week 3 of quitting.

    I thought this would be a piece of cake for me because I’m not a huge sweet eater but I have actually found it really hard. I can’t believe how habitual and mindless my suagr eating was!

    My cravings have hit me badly this week but I’ve resisted all temptation!

    I have noticed feeling lighter and less sluggish when at the gym so I feel I can actually work even harder to get fitter.

    I spend more time in the supermarket really considering what I am going to eat for dinner. I can’t believe how mindless I was about what I ate. Even things that were seemingly healthy.

    I have always loved tea but have enjoyed making it a ritual at craving time and have started to explore different brands and flavours and have really found it calming when trying to get through my habitual periods of eating sweets. I’m in the process of selecting a teapot to make it even more special.

    I also bought a coconut and am learning how to open it. It has been entertaining for all my friends because I lack the equipment, strength and skill to do it. YouTube came in handy :-)

    I’ll admit I’m struggling at the moment but I know it will be worth it in the end.

    [Reply]

  • manda

    Hi Sarah,

    Thank you for the E book.
    It came at a time when I have been trying to get the motivation to do whats right for me and fix my bad habits.
    Although i wasnt a heavy sugar eater ie adding it do drinks etc – i was a chocolate lover so that well made up for my not having sugar in other foods/drinks. Also I was a very layz cook …drive thrus had become a common staple for the nights I was home and not at work.
    I am in week 3 – and have a had a couple set backs with letting my chocolate love get in my head and in the way of my goal. I will be sticking with it though. I had already been intergrating seeds etc into my meals so your book has been helpfull with helping me expand on that.
    I am loving all the comments and getting ideas from all your readers.
    I do have a question though, for the ladies – that time of the month for me I seem to feel the need for sugar, i dont know if its part of my “addiction” or if it is because of whats going on in the body at that time. I seem to feel more lathargic and lacking in energy. If anyone has any ideas on alternate pick me ups or any advice Id be most appreciative.
    :) Thanks again Sarah!!
    Manda

    [Reply]

    Anne-Marie Reply:

    I tend to eat almonds, Manda, they take so much chewing that the craving has gone by the time I’ve finished.
    Just been to my first ‘party’ and had no trouble staying sugar free! thrilled and had just one glass of wine…doubly thrilled.
    love and laughter to all.

    [Reply]

    Manda Reply:

    Thanks Anne Marie I will give almonds a go :)

    [Reply]

  • Karen

    Your friend has the best kitchen window in the world.

    [Reply]

    mel Reply:

    agree, i zoomed in on those little dudes and they have the coolest looks.

    [Reply]

  • http://eatingplansforweightloss.info jan

    Hi Sarah
    When I saw your book I thought what a great idea because it actually gives you a step by step program, so I downloaded it and decided to become an affiliate – I got my very first sale today – whoo hooo. I am sure that there will be many people the world over thanking you in years to come.

    [Reply]

  • http://oneaprilmorning.net Laura

    Loving it and passing on the goodness.

    Went to Melb last week and was taken to a lovely cocktail bar. Decided to try one of their famous cocktails since it was a special occasion and felt so sick afterwards… my sugar threshold seems to have lessened! I’ll just settle for a glass of Pinot next time.

    [Reply]

  • Littlepilgrim

    Hi everyone
    Im about 7 weeks into a sugar free lifestle, and have noticed all the benefits mentioned (mood, skin, belly etc). However, am starting to get a bit bored with the options. It’s not an issue of craving, just variety. Keep posting those experimental recipies! I dig thru the archives for new suggestions

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Hi Littlepilgrim
    You don’t ever have to get bored for recipes, grab the free magazines from your supermarket, look on tins and packets if you buy them, the newspaper, or Internet. I subscribe to Weight Watchers magazine because they have fabulous recipes – I do tend to cook with coconut oil or olive oil rather than using spray oil though and I always use butter instead of margarine. Most of the savoury recipes are sugar free (except for Thai cooking!). Now that you are in week 7 you will be well aware of where the hidden sugars are so get your recipe books, visit the local library or try some great websites such as http://www.taste.com.au. Good luck.

    [Reply]

  • Stephanie

    Sarah I’m sorry I haven’t bought your book so feel a bit cheeky leaving a comment but i have bought Nora’s book and gone on the paleo diet which she recommends no sugar. I have cheated and eaten a few bits of fruit and put dates in the nut balls recipie. The sugar from the dates was so extreme, am not doing that again!!
    I am very slim due to my hyperthyroid so for me I am was scared of loosing weight on the diet, but the fat reassured me.
    I am finding it hard to find good paleo snack and meal ideas that are australian, there are a lot of u.s ones and I find they have a different style of cooking. If you bought out an e- cookbook I would definitely buy it Your recipes are great but maybe with a non dairy hint option for us allergy people, I wish I could eat it!

    [Reply]

  • Merelyn

    Thanks so much for your amazing blog and e-book! I went sugar free for a couple of weeks earlier this year, then added “just a touch’ of fruit back in my diet. I was hungry immediately and couldn’t keep away from the ‘healthy fruit bowl”. I’ve now been sugar free for about 3 weeks. I haven’t counted deliberately, I just know that gets me somewhere near Christmas!
    My big question is, how do you eat out Thai food? It’s the only thing I’m missing, probably because as a gluten freebie, it’s such a treat. (I cheat with soy sauce…)
    My bloat has gone down, but I haven’t lost any weight. Still, I feel so much better! (And yes, I would love to lose those 2 kilos that have crept up somewhere between the age of 45 and 49. I was saving them for the menapause bloat!

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Hi Merelyn
    I do a fair bit of Thai cooking and not all recipes call for sugar. I would phone the restaurants where you usually go and ask them to tell you if they cook any recipes without sugar. You could also Google your favorite recipes and check for yourself, but also check with the restaurant as they might modify them.
    Re the not losing weight – just make sure that you are not over compensating the cutting out sugar with eating too much other foods. Sometimes you don’t realise how much you are actually eating!

    [Reply]

    Merelyn Reply:

    Thanks. we’re out for a bite tonight and i think I’ll choose Chinese instead of Thai – less sugar/

    [Reply]

    Jo Reply:

    You can buy the Val Roy curry thai pastes in a jar in the supermarket and they taste great and have no added sugar. I make a curry in the slow cooker overnight and if you need to sweeten it a bit I just add glucose at the end and mix it in (most mussaman curries call for brown sugar so I just substitute).

    [Reply]

    Merelyn Reply:

    Thanks I will definitely look for Val Roy.

    [Reply]

    Merelyn Reply:

    I’ve just made Neil Perry’s braised chicken and rice noodles for dinner. Gluten free, and sweetened with stevia instead of jaggery. No-one knew the difference and they all loved it! Sarah, can you please, should I be cutting out carbs as well? (Knowing they turn into glucose?) thanks!

    [Reply]

  • http://getron.blogspot.com Stepan Ovanesian

    Hy Sarah,
    I realy like,your website!

    [Reply]

  • Louise

    Hi,

    I’ve cut out all sugar for the last 2 weeks (mostly in the form of honey and medjool dates – at my worst I was going through 1 kg of honey a week *blush*).
    But, whilst my skin and eyes are clearer, I don’t have more energy – in fact, I’m totally bushed, and lacking the energy to exercise and run around (which sucks, as I love to be active).
    Any thoughts would be most appreciated. :)
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    mel Reply:

    i am no expert but i know what you mean. I’ve read that it takes a few weeks between 3-6 for your body to switch from using carbs for energy to ketones or fat burning. after this occurs your energy picks up if you are eating enough good fats and protein. This was in sarahs interview with Nora and is on her website Primal body primal mind.

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Hi Louise
    If you have been eating so much honey for such a long time you may be insulin resistant, you can read about it here at http://diabetes.webmd.com/guide/insulin-resistance-syndrome. WebMd is a US site run by doctors who write for non-medical people and its an excellent resource site.
    You are obviously having some great results with clearer skin and lack of energy really sucks, but stick with the program. The body is a wonderful organism and is constantly working towards homeostasis (balance). For example if you are cold you shiver, if you are hot you sweat to cool you down and if you give your body good nutrition, it should eventually come back to homeostasis and your blood sugar levels should come under control. Your body is getting used to the new regime!
    I used to eat a family bar of chocolate every day for about 2 1/2 years and got to the stage where I had to have a sleep when I got home before I could even think about cooking tea and then still go to bed early. I was so tired all the time. I don’t know for sure (not having a medical background) but I reckon the pancreas that regulates sugar in your system just gives up the ghost under that sort of abuse. But the good news is that I became sugar free and my health and attitude improved enormously.
    If you haven’t purchased Sarah’s book, I strongly recommend it as it is full of information, hints and recipes to keep you motivated.
    Some other things – drink plenty of water, at least 1.5 litres a day, get plenty of sleep, make sure you have some “me” time and go for short walks, even if you really don’t feel like it, it’s good for you and good for the soul to get out of the house!

    [Reply]

  • Jossie

    Is alcohol on the no-list when banning sugar? Just asking?!

    [Reply]

    Jo Reply:

    Dry white wine, red wines and beer have no sugar (it’s been turned into alcochol). Sweet white and dessert wines have sugar added to them. Spirits have no sugar but most liquers are very sugary (about 30%). Strongbow original is also sugar free. Enjoy :)

    [Reply]

  • Em

    I just got your e-book and I’m loving the idea. However, I eat a lot of salad and I don’t want to get rid of that. But every salad dressing I find is packed with sugar. And according to your e-book, Balsamic Vinegar is also a no-no. What do you suggest for salad dressing? I wouldn’t mind making homemade dressing, but I’m not a big fan of creamy dressing like ranch. I prefer a vinaigrette.

    [Reply]

    Miss Jodi Reply:

    Olive oil, lemon, sea salt and cycled pepper. Always. A. Winner

    [Reply]

    Miss Jodi Reply:

    Cracked pepper. Not cycled (?)

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    try whole egg mayo (about 1g of sugar/100g) or apple cider vinegar

    [Reply]

  • http://magpiesnest.typepad.com/magpiesnest/ Steph

    I had enthusiastically embraced David Gillespie’s books, blog etc and have been quite happy with that, but have really fallen off the bandwagon in terms of ‘needing’ a ‘little something’ with my coffee when out with friends. The social aspect of eating is deadly.

    I just don’t feel at all good about any of it. I know what to do, but the willpower problems to do it can cripple me at times. As a Baby Boomer with no thyroid at all, weight problems, diverticulitis, a bad leg, and migraines, it really is a ‘no-brainer’ to think that I need to rigidly adhere to a healthier lifestyle!

    Saw this Post of yours, and felt inspired to give your e-book a go, so bought it and downloaded it today. I’m looking forward to some fresh reinforcement!

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Hey Steph
    I think the word “rigidly” says a lot about how you view your “no sugar diet”. We humans are social beings and that often means coffee and cake or a meal sometimes and we are not psychologically hard wired to constantly refuse ourselves something. It usually works that the more we say no to ourselves the more we want! I think “will power” is a much overrated commodity, it’s more important to really want to do something and then you have motivation which is a much more powerful force.

    I used to be a terrible sugar addict but I am not now. I can go out with friends and just have a cup of coffee because I really do not want cake, but if I do feel like cake I certainly have a piece. You only really need to stay off sugar for the time it takes to re-balance your system and stop the cravings. But don’t beat yourself up for having treats, this is life, it’s too short to be beating yourself up over a treat and spoil the enjoyment of going out with your family and friends. Just because you have a treat as well, doesn’t meant that you have undone all the good work to date.

    Have a look at Chapter 4 in Sarah’s ebook because it addresses what to say to your friends and family if they give you a hard time during the 8-week program, and also Chapter 7 about getting back on the wagon after a relapse – she states “Don’t punish yourself” and I totally agree.

    I largely stay off sugar now, if I eat too much, my body certainly lets me know with a nice big sugar headache and feeling lethargic. But in my family I am usually the one who makes the desserts because I love making them and take much pleasure in indulging with my loved ones.

    [Reply]

  • Miranda

    All things are going well. My eating didn’t include any sugars except in fruit, but I reduced my fruit load to only 1 serve a day. I did this along with the Paleo method after your interview with Nora. My results have been really positive – my IBS is in check like never before, and I am feeling really good. I have taken out tomatoes as they are a nightshade and that has also helped calm things down. My only weakness is rice cakes – as a runner and fitness nut I am reluctant to give these up. But i know that I will get there. My question now – to myself and anyone happy to give advice is whether or not to go completely fruit free and just see how that all goes for me too. I only eat fruit as part of my breakfast and that is the only time of day that I have noticed that my stomach has more reactions than other times of the day. I eat my fruit – generally blueberries or raspberries and have hard boiled eggs. I know that the eggs are not the issue, so could I have some suggestions as to what to have with my eggs if I take out the fruit? I can’t have any nuts, dairy and with fructose malabsoprtion issues certain veggies are out too.
    Thoughts?

    [Reply]

    Casey Reply:

    What about making an Omlette with veg u can eat or have a green drink (spirulina etc) with your eggs? I personally can’t have eggs and tend to have leftovers for breakfast. Ive moved away from the notion of having to have ‘breakfast’ type foods for breakfast :)

    [Reply]

    Miranda Reply:

    Thanks Casey,

    Have just tried the veggies with my eggs for breakfast. It’s funny because I didn’t even crave the fruit. It seems to be more comforting on my stomach and digestion too. Given that I have fruit everyday perhaps the no fruit thing for a while might do me dome good
    Cheers

    [Reply]

    lizzymint Reply:

    My only advice would be to try scrambling the eggs – no milk obviously. Not sure why scrambling them makes them easier to digest for IBS, but it does. And pick your fruit wisely (excuse the pun). I can eat mango and strawberries with no IBS symptoms, but berries, grapes, just about anything else – no. I no longer avoid the vegies that I love – even though I’m doing FODMAPs – I just keep the numbers down. I have ‘Naturally Gluten-free’ bread (buns are the best) – gluten-free, almost sugar-free – for breakfast with about a quarter of a banana (no more) spread on it. Yummy! (Have you read Sweet Poison? It changed the way I looked at FODMAPs – a lot easier to follow. Good luck!

    [Reply]

    Miranda Reply:

    I haven’t read Sweet Poison, but I think I should as you mentioned quite a few fruits that I avoid because of FODMAPs and then you also say that the fruit that causes you trouble, are the ones that are ‘allowed’ on the FODMAPs. What I have found is that overall my general serving sizes of fruit or vegetables has to be somewhat diminished and perhaps even not included in a ‘meal’ or snack. Something that the health gurus are always saying to increase! But given that you said too that SP is easier to follow re the FODMAPs I am definately intrigued!
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  • Casey

    I quit sugar for 8 weeks earlier in the year, and I did find that it made some amazing changes to my life. Clearer skin, clearer brain, less tired, definitely less bloated. Fantastic. And prior to this, I was a heavy sugar eater (I’m talking several big blocks of chocolate per week; soft drink) although I have always been small so weight was never a problem.

    However, I don’t believe in strict diets or regimes when it comes to food. Restricting certain foods is bad for my mental health, I find! And I also find the fanaticism or competitive group mentality which can exist within the followers of any particular way of living, eg. diet, exercise, to be a real turn off.

    So I have decided to strike a happy medium. I do not eat sugar on a regular basis; I eliminate incidental sugar and am very mindful of what I eat. But I do not refrain from eating birthday cake or joining in when sugar is consumed in social situations. Now and then is fine; the body will detox it out overnight. It’s not as big of a deal to me anymore. I just don’t want to be that office bore who lectures people about sugar during an office birthday party! The person who won’t have a small slice of cake because they’re afraid that one taste of the stuff will derail them for life. I’m not that fragile – keep it in perspective – I can keep going with my healthy lifestyle with minimal sugar the next day.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.yourelement.com.au Naomi

    Someone asked about salad dressing… I put about a tbsp on apple cider vinegar on my lunch time salad. I can’t explain why this stuff tastes horrendous as a drink (my FIL has a swill every day for heart health or something, and I sometimes gargle it when I have a sore throat), but it goes perfectly with salad!

    [Reply]

  • whitney fast

    I bought your e-book, but I don’t think this is for me. Could I get a refund?

    [Reply]

    Jo Reply:

    ?? If you buy a book at the shop, read it, and don’t like it do you think they’ll give you a refund!?

    [Reply]

  • Rosie

    I’ve also just purchased your e-book and I think it’s great! It’s got some really good tips, which I hadn’t thought of (thanks Sarah) and I’ve loved reading everyone’s tips and comments too! :-)

    [Reply]

  • ChaosTheory

    I applaud you Sarah for your bravery, in being willing to expose your own vulnerability / health in the public forum so that others can benefit.

    For me I have had ME/ CFS for 10 years your blog is another support. I recently took myself off Gluten (despite no testing positive as Coelic). Exasperated that Drs have no clue how to treat this illness I found Gluten free helped a lot, but its still not right.

    So after a recent relapse (with accompanying sugar intake) I came across your I Quit Sugar e-book only last week, and already I have experienced profound health benefits (though I also think I am now going through a detox..). I had already started to reduce sugar significantly but taking sugar out totally has added that extra kick to the existing Gluten free-ness.

    Since taking sugar out for one small week I can now stand for long periods without feeling like I am going to collapse. Crippling muscle pain has almost totally gone. Brain fog, whilst still around, lifts for some long wonderful periods during the day and I can think.

    I was a total sugar addict – lurching for chocolate at the predictable times each day, trying to get quick fixes of energy, and yet eating ‘healthily’ the rest of the time. I thought I was doing enough.

    But for me sugar truly seems to be a noxious poison. The CFS ‘blood poisoning’ feeling in the whole body, which feels similar to a hangover or a fever, has also reduced. I used to feel like my body buzzed and couldn’t switch it off. Now, there’s periods where a cloud has lifted I remember briefly what wellness felt like ( I used to be a health / exercise nut ‘before CFS’). Faaaarrr out, it’s remarkable.

    Who knows how long this lasts, but the past week is hopeful. There’s still lots of symptoms, and it’s ups and downs with any treatment for me; a life journey, similar to yourself it seems Sarah.

    What will be interesting is if my immunity is also enhanced, and I no longer catch every freakin’ virus going. I know sugar feeds infections in the gut so it makes obvious sense. But I am wondering if you are aware of any other immune implications for sugar Sarah? So far all the talk seems to be around cardiac /diabetes issues.

    Gratitude for your vulnerability Sarah!

    [Reply]

  • Tina

    Hi Sarah, I had a biggest relapse today :( had been doing so well…. I’m still “addicted” but I do feel bloated and disgusting…… the withdrawals are horrible. Another thing to contribute to my downfall…. I made a dextrose coconut cake (was ahmayzing… sigh) but David Gillespe doesn’t recommend even dextrose when you’re still weaning yourself off the sugar……. I’m going to re-read over the appropriate sections of your e-book and get back on track. Thanks heaps, love your book, love your work!

    [Reply]

  • annemarie

    I bought the book, but I’ve been too busy to read it properly and follow the program. So I JUST QUIT, cold turkey -style. It’s been about four weeks now. I’ve relied heavily the tips from this blog and the bits and pieces that I’ve managed to skim from the book.

    First, a bit about me: I was a total sugar addict. I ate apples and chocolate throughout my teenage years and not much else. Throughout my twenties, I continued to consume sweeties like an infant at Easter. I’d have a soy latte (full of sugar; naturally, I only like the vanilla flavor) and muffin/sticky bun for brekkie, and sometime in the afternoon a 100gram bar of dark chocolate. I did this pretty much every single day until now (I’m 34). Also, I’ve always been a little underweight. My energy is of the high, buzzy kind, but when I do yoga or meditate or anything that relaxes me deeply, I collapse with fatigue.

    Oddly enough, I actually didn’t find it hard to give up sugar. This was a huge surprise– I really thought I would have a terrible time with it. It’s actually not hard at all.

    Straight away, I felt a lot calmer, more grounded. My energy is less jagged. I am much less of a thundering bitch during moon time, which is good news for everybody. I think I might have put on a few pounds, but my waist is smaller– in other words, it’s more of a squeeze pulling my jeans over my ass, but then when they’re on they’re looser on the waist. Obviously, I am very pleased about this (womanly curves, at last).

    [Reply]

  • lizzymint

    I replaced sugar with chips. Giving up sugar was easy as – now for the chips………..

    [Reply]

  • Cindy

    I have now changed over from cereal for breakfast to having 2 tablespoons of organic shredded coconut, 1 tablespoon of LSA, and a dessert spoon of chia seeds mixed with plain full fat organic yoghurt – this keeps me going for a full morning without any thoughts of needing anything until lunchtime. Am loving the effect that the no sugar is having on me and my under active thyroid. More energy, less aches and pains, and no brain fog. Win, win win as far as I’m concerned. Thank you Sarah.

    [Reply]

  • Polly

    Hi Sarah just coming up to the end of week three for me. I have managed to get rid of most sugar ( I think) even the sneaky stuff like the shake of chocolate on the cappuccino. That’s another thing that has gone now coffee, just lost the taste for it. So far haven’t lost a single gram, I am 20kg overweight and if I am honest that is the real reason I wanted to drop sugar. The other thing I find is that I know longer crave alcohol. I have never been a big chocolate or biscuit eater to begin with and I have never really snacked between meals so that part was easy. BUT I am feeling really low. I am naturally a very upbeat happy person but I am moody and down in the dumps’ consistently. I am heading off to the GP this week for a general check up but I just don’t feel right. Not unwell just – blah. It doesn’t help that I have given up so much and I have lost no weight at all. So not happy but prepared to sit it out and see.

    [Reply]

    Anne-Marie Reply:

    please stick with it, Polly, you will lose weight eventually. Have you read Sweet Poison by David Gillespie…he was 45kg overweight!
    good luck.

    [Reply]

  • Liesbeth

    Week 2 so far and enjoying how the cut-down has mae me really aware of the sugar in my ‘good’/low GI sugars like honey and maple syrup – quite horrifying!

    A quick questions about vanilla – I noticed that my vanilla bean paste and extract both have sugar in the ingredients list, and there is no 100g scale to check how much. Is vanilla powder sugar free and can I use this in baking instead? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    liz Reply:

    yep the vanilla powder I have is definitely sugar free

    [Reply]

    Liesbeth Reply:

    Thanks Liz – where do you buy yours?

    [Reply]

  • http://ilivelightly.com izennah

    Hi Sarah,
    You book is divine, and has inspired my thyroid-overachieving, fibromyalgia-afflicted Mum to attempt a sans gluten and sugar lifestyle for two months (albeit with grumbling). Thank you!
    I too have a kooky immune system, and have been on the FODMAP diet since December, no fructose/lactose/dietary sugars, with my dietician Jaci http://dietsolutions.net.au/, and gluten free for 5 years.
    I am a different girl!
    Lifelong allergies, insomnia, ridiculous tummy ‘issues’, jaundice, weight loss, constant pain, inflammation, mercurial energy and moods, all stabilised.
    I had not heard of fructose malabsorption, or known that fructose could be a problem, so thank you for raising awareness in such a beautiful, do-able way!
    I now point confused friends toward your book, so they can see that living sugar-free is deliciously, luxuriously simple!
    Love izennah xo

    [Reply]

    Red Reply:

    Thank you so much for sharing the link. I have been to two doctors and had an endoscopy for my chronic reflux which appears randomly. They gave me nexum it didn’t work. I went to a naturopath who gave me bitters and enzymes which burned my throat. I am a coeliac who has hyperthyroid, i have just gone paleo and was thinking of finding A dietician to guide me through it as i am already very slim from my thyroid and adrenal issues so was worried cutting carbs would make me look and feel. I feel good so far but have been having about two fruit a day so would just be nice to have a professionalopinion. Cheers

    [Reply]

  • Aimee

    Hi Sarah,
    I don’t crave sugars as much as I did a few years back, although I find now that I am almost living off carbohydrates (I am a vego) and often crave a bowl of pasta when I’m feeling down or tired. I haven’t purchased your book yet, but wanted to know first if you think it may help me beat my carb cravings or is this book more for sugar cravings? I know carbs break down into to sugars but it feels like a different craving I get as I dont crave lollies and cakes as I do for pasta and bread.

    [Reply]

  • wilhelm

    4 weeks in and I feel FAB!!!!

    [Reply]

  • Mel

    Week 3 for me and it’s going great so far – thanks Sarah! :)
    Just a few questions if anyone can help? What is everyone’s view on high sugar veggies, eg. carrot, beetroot and corn! I love them but aren’t sure if I need to cut them out!
    And what about diet softdrinks? Coke Zero has been my saviour! But I’ve read some reports that artificially sweetened drinks can actually make you crave real sugar!!
    Any insights would be appreciated!!

    [Reply]

    toni Reply:

    Ditch the coke zero, Mel! Artificial sweeteners do indeed make you crave real sugar, not to mention how unspeakably bad they are for you…pure chemical poison. You will feel so much better (and less bloated!) without it. Google EXCITOTOXINS if you want to do some research and I guarantee you will be less willing to open another can.

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    I was actually wondering the same thing as you re. the vegetables! I love red capsicum but have been trying not to go too overboard on it, so would love to hear people’s opinions.

    And unfortunately, yes to Coke Zero being evil. I love it too. Im in mourning.

    [Reply]

    Miranda Reply:

    Me too re the veggies. i don’t eat corn, capsicum or beetroot, but I love carrots – i think maybe too much as i always seem to eat too many carrots and I wondered if that had anything to do with the higher ‘sugar’ content of them and then they becoming that ‘sugar craving’.

    [Reply]

    Mel Reply:

    I’m glad I’m not the only one wondering about these veggies!! My biggest addiction is beetroot – It just doesn’t feel like a salad without it! But I’m wondering if it’s making my quitting harder by eating it!?

    Thanks so much for the advice re: the artificial sweeteners Toni! I think I knew the truth but just didn’t want to admit it. And although I’ve done some research, I think it’s going to be a hard habit to break! :( anyone had any experiences with breaking a diet coke / coke zero addiction? Please tell me it’s achievable? Haha!

    [Reply]

    Naomi Reply:

    Mel – the Coke addiction argh!! (I’m a Pepsi gal myself). My DH and I have a bottle (1.25-2ltre) each weekend and then I usually sneak a can in somewhere during the week. The first weekend we went without it, we were both pretty on edge. I was almost dreaming of a nice cold can of Pepsi Max…. Dh thought he had the jitters. Just goes to show how frightfully addictive the stuff is!! So all the more reason to try and ditch it for good. Really try to go cold turkey on it. I’ve given up 98% of my sugar intake and getting rid of pepsi is by far the thing that I have wanted the most. I’ve now gone two weeks without it and this week has been a lot easier. After my 8 weeks, I might allow some things back in, but the black stuff has been banned for life… eeek! Just do it! :) Good luck.

    [Reply]

    toni Reply:

    Mel I gave up diet coke two years ago. I was having a can a day, as well as having 2 to 3 cups of tea. Still having the tea, but haven’t really missed the diet coke too much. I’m really glad I ditched it before going sugar free. I don’t think I would be able to handle the chemical taste now!

    [Reply]

  • Kya

    Hi Sarah!
    I’m on week 3 of being sugar free. I’m feeling great! I can’t believe I can walk into Sugar Station with my friends and not need to buy or eat anything! I’m now addicted to Vegemite and avocado, as well as hallumi cheese. The last couple of days the chocolate cravings have kicked in, I haven’t had a chance to get to the natural food shop to pick up some cocoa nibs.

    I found a sugar-free chocolate bar in the supermarket. It seems too good to be true! It’s called Sugar Free Dark Chocolate by Well, Naturally. It’s sweetened by Stevia. Should I be steering clear of stevia for the moment?

    [Reply]

    Renae Reply:

    Hi,

    I was going to post the same thing about the same chocolate bar! It does seem to good to be true…can someone help us out please :)

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    It no longer contains maltitol. I swear it used to! Now it contains Stevia (which is meant to be ok..?) and erythritol, which I am not sure about.

    I dont know if that helps or makes things more confusing!

    [Reply]

    Naomi Reply:

    Well that’s good news… i think…From what I understand, stevia is ok, but only after 6+ weeks off sugar completely. Stevia seems to be one of the tidbits of sweetness you can bring back in after 6 weeks.

    Anne-Marie Reply:

    Hi,
    David says stevia and erythritol are up to you. ‘there are 3 categories of substitute sweetener as far as a recovering sugarholic is concerned: Those that are absolutely safe to consume, those which may be safe in limited does or over limited timeframes, eg. stevia and erythritol (and others) and those that are not safe under any circumstances.’

  • lotus bee

    ok, so after weeks of procrastinating after buying the ebook and using breastfeeding as an excuse not to start just yet, i have decided to start today. right now. after reading all the comments and support (including the other breastfeeding woman who has started – thank you!) i figure it’s best to be in the moment and take on all this advice from you all right now. otherwise how will i ever implement them all and create permanent change in my life. i am so excited! how strange?! … in fact i feel so ready i feel like i have missed out on something by not starting weeks ago ahhaha!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.yourelement.com.au Naomi

    Check the ingredients in the chocolate bar. I’ve had a couple of “sugar-free” chocolate bars and thought I was on a good thing. But the primary ingredient in the couple I tried was maltitol which both Sarah and David warn to keep clear of. Not sure exactly why… But I also think it wasn’t helping break my addiction – still having a chocolate fix every few days was still keeping that pathway active to have something sweet after lunch for example. I think the idea is that until at least week 6, you get rid of sweetness from your diet altogether.

    [Reply]

  • Anne-Marie

    Maltitol converts to fructose in your system. I thought I’d found a sugar free chocolate too but there was the Maltitol in small print. yes, avoid all sweet stuff for at least 6 weeks..even the cakes etc. that David has recipes for that use dextrose…as long as possible. I found the dextrose set me back too so now I’m still avoiding it and will probably until after Christmas.

    [Reply]

  • http://g2-generationgreen.blogspot.com/ Daniella

    Hi Sarah,

    I was just wondering how much weight you have lost since being sugar-free?

    Thanks, D

    [Reply]

  • Jess Lowe

    Hi Sarah,

    I gave it a go and lasted about 5 days. I would consider myself pretty healthy, I dont eat a lot of ‘junk food’, I eat loads of fresh whole foods, and drink green juices etc, but I wanted to get rid of the honey on my porridge in the mornings, and stick to berries instead of adding dried fruits etc to my breakky. The problem for me was the saying no to dessert at a friends place. I was made an individually baked chocolate souffle with vanilla ice cream. I didnt want to say no. And because it was the fist bit of dessert I had, even though I am not a big dessert person anyway (we dont keep ice cream or cake or anything in our house), it was the best I had ever tasted and craved more the next day. I find it really difficult to say no to dessert, especially when someone has put in the effort to make it for me. I just genuinely love ice cream as a treat, and unfortunately most of the people who provide me with desserts (when friends invite us to dinner) arent familiar with making alternative ‘ice creams’ out of coconut milk and cacao etc. I would love to just never desire dessert, but I love it too much! As a sometimes food ofcourse. For example, tonight I am going to quay restaurant, renowned for their amazing desserts, I have to try em out!!! Saying no to sugar all together, is an awesome thing if we can accept never having dessert again. I just dont know if I have the strength to go fully cold turkey. I would hope that I could learn to just hate the taste of sugar, and all my problems would be solved :)

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Hi Jess
    I don’t think that we humans will ever learn to hate sugar! I think the goal is for you to control the sugar rather than have the sugar control you. If a friend of mine made me a beautiful special dessert I would never say no as well and if I was going somewhere famous for its desserts I would definitely try them out. However, as you would know from Sarah’s articles and the comments from the readers, sugar is very detrimental to your health if you eat it every day and in big quantities. So I think that the goal for anybody is to get any cravings under control so that you can go days without sugar and really enjoy the treats. You sound as if you have a really healthy diet so maybe you sugar cravings are not a problem. Most of us give up sugar for health and weight reasons, so if you don’t have any problems, enjoy the occasional treats. My nutrition teacher told us that we should have treats no more than three times a week – so it’s just a rough guide.

    [Reply]

    Naomi Reply:

    I think this is great advice Jan – this is what my ultimate goal is. At the moment (well until 2 weeks ago) sugar definitely controlled me. I’m enjoying being much more in control of it. I’m going to so the 8 week program and then will hopefully be able to moderate how much sugar I give myself.

    [Reply]

    Jess Lowe Reply:

    Thanks Jan! Yes, great advice. By the way the desserts at quay were AMAZING! Yes, I think it is about getting the cravings sorted out, and not being controlled by sugar. I am not overweight, I am fit, and all the tests by my doctor say I am healthy as I could be. However I am 23 years old, havent had any children, and have never had any serious ilnesses or injuries. I know that my body will not always cope with sugar in the same way it does now, so it would be good to be able to keep it to a minimum. Three times a week seems like a perfectly doable guideline. I think if we can be sugar free a majority of the time, saying yes to and enjoying dessert once in awhile can be an enjoyable thing, rather than a guilt filled, controlling situation. I think we need to give ourselves some grace sometimes, to really listen to our bodies in response to certain foods, and learn what is best for our individual health. There is countless information out there “Dont have dairy, but dont have soy either, it will give you cancer” etc etc.
    I believe we have a responsiblility to do what we can to monitor the state of our health and adjust our diets accordingly.

  • Kate

    Hi
    I am 2 weeks into quitting sugar. The first few days were fine, since then i feel physically so weak. I had been exercising regularly, but now finding my legs just dont have the go in them. My apetite has increased & im eating really healthily.
    I started with light body aches & kept thinking I was getting sick, now I feel a bit shakey & light headed even though im eating very regularly. No headaches.
    Just wanted to know is this NORMAL to go on so long like this? I want to keep going. I have my first (fun) triathalon next weekend & need to feel good.
    If this is sugar withdrawl, im NEVER having sugar again!

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Anne-Marie Reply:

    stop exercising for a while. if you want to lose weight you will do so without exercise.
    let your body adjust to the new regime…you will start to feel really good and then you can build up the exercise routine again. I probably would do the triathlon so soon either..keep the fluids up if you do.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: Our November Challenge: Say NO to Sugar! | The World by Us

  • Anne-Marie

    sorry, that was: “I probably would NOT do the triathlon etc.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.sosensational.com.au Sania

    madam flavour teas mmm yum!
    http://www.madameflavour.com/

    [Reply]

  • Liesbeth

    Just another comment I wanted to make to everyone is check your medicine cabinet! I’ve just recovered from a week of being sick and nearly every second product I tried to take contained glucose or sucrose – strepsils, soothers, gastrolyte etc! I never even thought to check!

    And T2 citrus teas are often high in sugar. Including my old favourite turkish apple…

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    True regarding the medicines…with the tea, I wouldn’t worry too much – it’s such a small quantity – one or two slices of apples that infuses through a pot of tea. Enjoy the tea!!!

    [Reply]

    Sugar Free Reply:

    Hi Lisbeth,

    Having worked at T2, DO worry about the sugar. The Turkish teas aren’t tea at all, just sugar (sucrose), citric acid and flavouring – so for every teaspoon of tea (of which most people use 2 teaspoons per cup and have more than one cup) you are ingesting half a teaspoon of fructose.

    The other citrus teas, however, are fine – just dried fruits which, as Sarah said, are ok since they are just being infused into hot water. Try the strawberries and cream, even when I used to eat sugar I found it lovely and sweet and you could always add a little bit of stevia and chill it for summer :)

    [Reply]

    Sugar Free Reply:

    Sorry for spelling your name wrong, Liesbeth!

  • http://www.queensix.com.au James

    Liesbeth – Glucose is fine. It is not poison and not metabolized by the liver.

    [Reply]

  • Gemma

    Hi Sarah!
    I just wanted to say thank you for your wonderful e-book! I first noticed it on Twitter, and before that I had never thought about quitting sugar. I have found your book so easy to read, I’m about the end week 2 and I find myself flicking through your book just to make sure I’m using all your tips and tricks and looking ahead to week 3 to know what I’m in for.
    I also have just finished reading Sweet Poison and it is amazing how a little bit of knowledge about the issue changes your whole perspective. I have been told my whole entire life that eating fat is very bad for you. I was told this from my family (who were just looking out for me and my health) but what is scary is that the message that fat is bad was taught to me all throughout primary and secondary school as part of my school curriculum. Even having now learnt more about the way our bodies metabolise fat and sugar, I still am struggling to feel like eating animal fat like bacon and chicken, and even natural fat in avacados is ok!
    I’m feeling really strong and haven’t touched a single piece of sugar since I started, and don’t really feel like I’m missing out on anything!
    Thanks for the wonderful information, it really has helped me develop a really positive approach to eating and living!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.dutch-licorice.com/?en_basket,18 sweet licorice

    A person necessarily assist to make seriously posts I might state. This is the first time I frequented your website page and up to now? I amazed with the analysis you made to make this particular publish incredible. Fantastic activity!

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  • Christopher

    Hi Sarah!! well this is my sixth week and I really am not looking back! So far I’ve lost 6.5kgs just from going Sugar free! I feel full all the time and I don’t eat excessively anymore either. I started adding sweetness back into my diet this week and I must say, I’ve lost the taste for it! I didn’t think it would happen to be honest! I am so glad I have done it and want to thank you for your support!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.actioncameracompany.com/ Aaron

    I am going to attempt this from 1st Feb, to tie in with “Febfast”, so I will be laying off the booze also. Impressive to see so many who have stuck to it for long period with success!

    [Reply]

  • Vicki

    Hi everyone, I am starting to eat sugar-free tomorrow and am a little nervous. I am a big sugar eater and the most difficult thing for me will be no chocolate. The two things I’m conflicted over is Bread and Milk? I couldn’t get a definitive answer from the e-book. I am thinking full cream milk is OK and maybe Gluten free bread? Also when you eat breakfast out what do you order? I assume bread isn’t sugar free and when you can’t order muesli or fruit it makes it difficult? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank Sarah!

    [Reply]

  • S

    Hi Vicki, I felt the same way when I first started, but that was well over a year ago, and it didn’t take long to get used to. I just have normal full cream dairy milk. It does have some sugar, but I think it is lactose rather than fructose. And as I do have quite a lot of milk I didn’t want to make things too difficult or complicated so stuck to the same milk. Same for bread really. I did eat slightly less bread, and would go for wholemeal/brown rather than white. But if you are used to eating bread I would say don’t cut it out or change it completely while also cutting out sugar as I find one change at a time works best.

    [Reply]

  • nayana

    Hi Sarah,
    I have just started my sugar free journey and am a little confused about two things…full fat milk looks as though it has quite alot of sugar. I normally have this in my coffee in the morning. What would be the right amount to have per day or should I just start having black coffee?
    Second question was coconut flakes also seem to have alot of sugar, should I avoid them initially?
    Thankyou

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    Hi Sarah. Love the book and your work. I’ve been sugar free for three weeks now. I’ve stuck to it perfectly, not eating anything with over 3g per 100g. For the first week I had headaches and shakiness and dizziness but I pushed through and started to feel better. Then, suddenly at the two week mark I had intense cravings that left me jittery and in tears. I’m at the three week mark and I’ve been emotional, irritable, depressed, anxious and just feel generally awful. I can hardly get out of bed in the morning and when I first wake up I seem to have flu like symptoms. I’ve never had any of this before. I felt so awful last night that I relapsed and ate a chocolate bar and all of a sudden, almost instantly, I felt calm and level headed and energised. But a few hours late I crashed even harder than before. Is all of this normal? Does everyone experience this? Most of the posts that I’ve read are saying that they feel great by the three week mark. Am I doing something wrong? Could it be because my sugar addiction was so bad to start with? I’ve always eaten chocolate all day long and would round it off by eating a whole packet of Tim tams most nights. I would have sugar to start the day and sugar to finish it. But for some reason I’m not overweight? In any case if anyone else is finding it this tough please let me know because I’m starting to think there may be something wrong for me to feel this awful this late in the peice! Thanks! :)

    [Reply]

  • Lou Lou

    Hi,

    I have been sugar free now for 7 weeks and I simply can’t believe that I don’t fancy cake anymore!!! No cravings it is amazing. 8 weeks ago i would never have been able to resist a cake or three (yes i know bad!!) a day, it’s fab.
    I have been fine until the last week and feeling a little run down, just sore throat etc… do you think this is part of the detox process?? i know it is a silly question but when i get unwell it only normally lasts a day or two never over a week. Just wondering if others have had this too?? I am all for a good detox just wondered if this is normal.

    Thank you so much for your fabulous books, they are now my food bibles. What i love the most is that it has made me so aware of what my kids eat, which was good before but now I am aware of what is in foods and I feel so much more knowledgeable about it.
    Huge thank you for changing my life
    Lou x

    [Reply]