my chat with Nora Gedgaudas on paleo eating (a podcast)

Posted on October 4th, 2011

On Friday I had the indescribable joy of chatting to Nora Gedgaudas on Skype. Nora wrote the paleo living bible Primal Body, Primal Mind and is a gem of a woman.

photo via The Alkaline Sisters

In a nutshell, the premise of her thinking is this:

* our genealogy hasn’t changed since Paleolithic times when we ate fat, protein and low-starch veggies.

* our diet has changed to a high carb/sugar/starch diet, with the introduction of the agricultural period 10,000 years ago, which our bodies have not been able to adjust to…which makes us sick and tired.

Ergo:

We need to eat MORE FAT and ELIMINATE CARBS for optimal health and longevity.

Perhaps the most home-hitting point she makes is this:

Fat doesn’t make us fat, fat eaten with carbs does

and:

We aren’t what we eat, we’re how we metabolise what we eat

If you’re interested in all this, her book is seriously the go-to bible. I went crazy with my highlighter and post-it reading it last week. And for auto-immune/hashimoto sufferers…it almost caters directly to our conditions (Nora’s family all have hashimotos).

The great news is: Nora’s also out here in Australia in November speaking at universities in Sydney, Armidale and the Gold Coast. I’ll be at the Goldie to see her speak. It will be rad.

But in the meantime…our chat:

Some of you asked some questions via twitter on key points of the paleo diet. I thought I’d spell things out a little, because they’re themes that I’ve touched on a lot on this blog. My sugar quitting philosophy is similar, ditto my exercise approach.

But aren’t grains needed by our bodies?

It would appear not. They contain no essential nutrients we can’t get from elsewhere in more effective ways. They’ve traditionally been eaten when fat and protein haven’t been around (and, thus, signal to the body there’s a famine going on). Since we have the option not to eat them, why would we? Especially given the below…

* they contain antinutrients that interfere with mineral absorption, gluten being one such. Grains are defenceless little things so they contain poisons to ward off predators. Some animals, like birds, have adjusted to these poisons. Us? Nope.

* gluten-containging grains take things even further, causing bowel damage and then auto immune diseases and even cancer. I’ll discuss this more in another post.

* carbs cause our metabolism to become sugar burners instead of fat burners…and stuff up our metabolism in all kinds of ways…which makes us fat and sick.

What about quinoa…it’s a seed, right?

I’ve been a quinoa advocate in the past…but I’ve since learned it has similar properties to grains, including chemical defense systems that irritate the gut – soap-like molecules called saponins. Gluten attaches to a carrier molecule in the intestines, saponins  punch holes in the membranes of the microvilli cells.

What about legumes?

Well, they too contain poisons in their outer layers. I’ve written about this before – soaking and sprouting legumes does help. Nora’s take is that legumes are mostly starch and only a little protein, so why bother? Me, I like legumes (in small quantities), so will stick with them for now.

Do you have to cut all carbs?

I ask Nora this…her answer is…well, it’s best to. Our bodies will always metabolise carbs (sugars and starches) first (because it’s toxic), so whenever you eat carbs you remain a sugar burner not a fat burner.

I’m about to try the approach and will report back on the process. It’s said to take 3-6 weeks for the conversion to kick in and there are supplements I’ll take to deal with cravings. I’ll share my tips with you shortly. In the meantime be sure to check out Nora when she’s here in Australia.

Have you done the paleo switch? Any tips? Feedback?

 

 

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  • Ann

    I have been Paleo for about 6 months and have never felt better. I have been gluten free for 2 years, but it wasn’t until I cut out the grains and increased good fats and protein that I really got well. I am down to my pre-Hashi’s weight effortlessly, feel good all day, sleep well at night and most of my debilitating muscle/joint pain is gone. Read anything by Robb Wolf for information. Mark Sisson is great, too.

    [Reply]

    Rob Reply:

    Hi Anne. I was diagnosed with coeliac disease two years ago. I got off the breads and cereals immediately, and continued on a gluten free diet. I improved but not to 100%. I was kind of left wondering if I was just damaged goods. I was still being effected by legumes and peas etc. It was so confusing to me. 6 weeks ago I came across paleo. I subscribed to daily apple, I read Sarah Wilson. 4 weeks ago I got rid of all sugars, carbs and just ate plants and animals. I ate all the fat off my steaks, I increased the amount of greens I ate by threefold. I spent the first two weeks crashing hard. My wife and I decided that I should have a cup of rice every second day, as to make it through the whole day. I took one cup, and the next few days were ok. I guess I cracked it. I broke through the wall! Now I feel constant energy all day, even through a period of intermittent fasting. My bowel action is amazing now, I think back to the urgency I had and laugh. It all seems great to me. It’s funny that I am eating way more fats now, and am losing body fat.I accept the paleo belief that grains are not fit for human consumption. My only problem now is trying to avoid pushing my newfound beliefs onto others, and just enjoying it. Thanks to this whole community for helping me on my journey. Big thanks to Sarah.

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  • Emily

    I’m slowly weaving my way towards paleo/primal eating. So many great websites for recipes, and Marks Daily Apple website is a great read.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    ta for sharing!

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    Cathy Reply:

    I feel very sad as I have had Graves Disease for years now and tried everything … and now it has started affecting my eyes – and I am blind in one eye and only have sight left in the other so I cannot afford to play dice with this. I am scheduled to have my thyroid removed on Tuesday and wish it could be otherwise but even if I started the Paleo today … I just can’t take the risk. And I am a HUGE bread lover! Funny, you can only get Graves by inheriting it and no one in my family has it or remembers anyone in living history having it. But am encouraged to eat Paleo in future.

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  • New Commenter

    Hi Sarah, I’ve been reading your blog for a while now and love it! I don’t usually comment, but here goes… I am very keen to try this paleo eating, but am not quite sure how I will cope without grains!! I have grown up eating cereal for breakfast, a sandwich/roll for lunch, and then usually some form of carbs with dinner (rice, potatoes or pasta). So, lots of grains and lots of carbs. One thing I’ve noticed (and I’m not sure if anyone else experiences this), is that even when I try to cut out carbs, say by having a big salad for lunch, I end up still feeling hungry. Even if I include meat or eggs in the salad, it doesn’t seem to satisfy quite as much as some nice, fresh bread. Is there hope for bread-lovers like me??!

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    Vienda Reply:

    Hello!
    I just wanted to send you some love and encouragement and say that YOU CAN DO IT!

    I’m gluten intolerant and so cut out all gluten grains about 2 years ago and then found that there weren’t really many grains left that I enjoyed eating so have naturally moved toward eating mainly greens and proteins and fats.

    That “not full” feeling you describe when you eat a big salad and still feel hungry, I know it as I used to get it too but I actually think it’s a “heavy” feeling that we are just accustomed to rather than real hunger. Once you get used to feeling “light” and realise that you can be full and light at the same time ….. well, it’s very exciting!

    Good luck with everything! x

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    Olivia Reply:

    Videnda, as a self-confessed carb and grain addict, who is DESPERATELY trying to slowly eliminate both, I have to say that your ‘full and light’ feeling sounds incredible! Thats all I want from my food. Thanks for giving me hope to keep going with it. :)

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    New Commenter Reply:

    Yes, thank you Videnda and Olivia, very nice to have some encouragement. Also, Olivia, I am also a “self-confessed carb and grain addict” – so glad to hear that I am not the only one!!! ;) Hopefully that “full and light” feeling with be a greater incentive than a trip to the bakery!

    Ashley Reply:

    I can totally relate to this when I eat just protein and fat and vegetables. No matter how much I eat I am constantly hungry. Does this go away? My stomach doesn’t get as bloated and I have more energy but I can’t seem to get enough to eat. My stomach feels empty.

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  • Cindy

    I have been following discussions about paleo eating hoping that someone else would ask this question but to no avail so far. So I will ask it. I have over the past 12 months really cut right down on all carbs/sugar very successfully – under active thyroid well under control, (am on medication though), but am terrified of giving up cereals (ie goodness superfoods Heart 1st with Barleymax) which I mix with LSA and plain yoghurt to avoid constipation. If I don’t have this things go really awry with my bowels. Any suggestions or comments Sarah?

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    Carolyn Reply:

    Hi Cindy
    I have struggled at times with the same thing. I make sure Im drinking plenty of water. I have found chia seeds really good in my yoghurt. The have omega 3s, protein, and lots of fibre. Strawberries are also low carb and good soluble fibre. Best wishes

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    chia seeds are great and slippery elm in yoghurt in the morning…add your LSA to that. I’ve found that grains actually bog me up more than anything.

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    Cindy Reply:

    Thanks for that Carolyn and Sarah, I will add the chia seeds and slippery elm and see how I go. Many thanks.

    Ivy Reply:

    I would add coconut oil, one teaspoon after brekkie and lunch. A high-protein diet requires fat to keep things lubricated. I would keep the LSA in the fridge, otherwise it will oxidate and go rancid, which in turn is inflammatory.

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  • Lena

    Really interested in the whole paleo-thing but what doesn’t come up in the discussion is the connection between fat and cholesterol. I have high cholesterol and all regular medical advise says to cut out saturated fats. How does this go together? And what is the recommended ratio of vegetables, protein (animal and non-animal) and saturated fat in this style of eating?

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    Maryann Reply:

    I also have an issue with my cholesterol and am currently on medication. My aim is to lower my cholesterol to the point that I not longer need statins and can maintain healthy levels with diet and exercise. I also have an under active thyroid to sort out, again I am on medication.

    Iisn’t this type of eating expensive? I am a wage slave and grains really help me to keep food within a reasonable budget. This is something that appears to really be considered in your advice Sarah.

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    Maria Hannaford Reply:

    Hi Lena, read Michael Pollen’s In Defense of Food, and his answer to this question on this site: http://michaelpollan.com/interviews/michael-pollan-debunks-food-myths/

    Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon is another good read about this issue.

    Medical advise of this nature is based on the lipid hypothesis, which is being debunked as we speak. News of it is slowly trickling through to the public. It might be years before it is well publicized, but I’m reading up on it myself now.

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    Mia Reply:

    Lena, Mark’s Daily Apple has a whole wealth of information about that!

    In a nutshell, the lipid hypothesis (the fat = bad model we have been eating by for the last 30 or so years) has been found to be wrong. The evidence that we thought backed this up, doesnt. As humans we have become more sophisticated in our studies and testing, and have been able to come up with better systems for investigating the human body and thusly have come up with more accurate information.

    He explains it better than I do… http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cholesterol/

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Lena, this is a whole two chapters In Nora’s book and she explains it better than anyone, I think. Sugar and starchs cause problematic cholesterol. High cholesterol on it’s own isn’t the issue. It’s simply the bandaids to the primary issue.

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    ssisme Reply:

    I’ve read a lot of great (in my opinion!) stuff on Chris Kresser’s site about this issue, and the wider paleo environment. http://www.chriskresser.com. :)

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  • Amanda

    I spent two years living in Italy where people eat refined carbs (pasta) for lunch and dinner. Italians have never heard of superfoods. They eat seasonally and they eat with joy, surrounded by friends and family. I have honestly never met a healthier, happier bunch. I believe in doing what’s right for your body, but I also think it’s a shame not to celebrate and enjoy age-old recipes. Eliminating grains completely seems a tad extreme and potentially socially isolating to me. After all, isn’t it all about finding balance and enjoying life?

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    Mia Reply:

    Italians also have some of the highest percentage of celiacs in the world, something like 30%, compared with about 1% in the rest of the western world. That wouldn’t make me happy.

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    Rosie Reply:

    That’s a good point Mia, I guess bread and pasta where made differently once upon a time. Maybe it’s the (over) processing of the grains that is affecting the younger generation of italians.

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Correct, wheat contained less gluten in the past. A lot less. So we could handle it better. Nora answers this question in part – things have got too bad for us to moderate…we have to take more drastic action

    Rosie Reply:

    Thanks for that Sarah. Shame that things have changed so much and are so far removed from what we used to eat. Hence the paleo diet I guess :-)

    Rosie Reply:

    I tend to agree with you Amanda. As much as I try cutting out food groups such as grains I can’t help but think of the cultures where they have enjoyed a long and healthy life and they have eaten grains. They eat rice in Okinawa (not brown rice either) or bread and pasta in Sardinia. Now I try to limit grains but I don’t think I’ll cut them out completely. I am of italian background so I also tend to think that food is about enjoyment too. I would also add that like New Commenter I don’t always feel full after having just salad and protein. Yes, I think it comes down to the individual and what works best for you.

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    Ivy Reply:

    Have you seen the bellies and waists in elderly Italians? No thanks, for me! :)

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    Rosie Reply:

    That’s not all Italians Ivy! A lot, especially the older ones (that I know) are looking a lot better than people half their age!

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  • Bridget

    That interview was great! So much info. Looking forward to reading about your progress, Sarah. I’d love to give this a go. Bit scared though… I <3 carbs.

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  • Miranda

    Hi Sarah,
    It’s funny – this is something a friend of mine in London recommend that I give a go at as he was advised because of his IBS. I thought it might be too tricky given that I have so many other food intolerances, however from doing some reading on this I realise that it does have beneficial qualities for someone with fructose/lactose/gluten issues. Other than rice, I pretty much follow this principle of eating. I will now eliminate the rice and see what happens! And I love that there are eggs in this as eggs are something that I have introduced at breakfast particularly instead of ‘traditional’ grains/fruit. As things seem to be improving with my IBS through a reduction in fruit and grains, perhaps eliminating this final grain might see more of an improvement. This is one ‘diet’ I am willing to give a try.

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    Have you tried switching to white rice? White is harmless, but brown rice contains the antinutrients mentioned before.

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    Miranda Reply:

    Hi Mia,
    Yes I did that and it did help! It’s funny so many of the recommended or ‘healthier’ foods such as brown rice are troublesome for IBS sufferers! Foods that are lower in fibre are actually better for my digestion to handle. It makes you wonder how many ‘diet’ or ‘health’ experts might suffer from (and perhaps unknowingly) IBS or other intolerances, but don’t ‘listen’ to their own bodies for fear of not buying into/believing or supporting the whole ‘healthy, clean eating’ that is tossed around. Tossed around sometimes rather flippantly too!

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    Mia Reply:

    Hi Miranda, glad to hear it! I have collitis so I get you 100%. I agree with you on the fibre too. Raw food diets are not good for people like us – we need the saturated animal fat to heal and repair our guts, and just enough fibre without being too much. And low fructose!

    Unfortunately so many health “experts” mean well, but are working on outdated information!

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    brown rice, if soaked, is “ok”. Or much the same as white rice. But both are super starches…

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    Miranda Reply:

    Sarah, given your history with you illness and finally developing the ability to ‘read’ and ‘listen’ to your body in order to help you heal, I wondered how you felt about the varying messages that are out there.
    As I have food intolerances myself and these past 12 months I have been going through the process of discovering what works for me and what doesn’t. I have done endless reading and research, spoken with professionals, tried to ‘listen’ to my body as it reacts/accepts foods etc. It is mentally exhausting and increases my anxiety, which can be counter productive for an IBS sufferer!
    You have tried so many different approaches and I wondered if you have yet to stumble on the ‘one’ method that has worked for you. Did you (for want of better term) ‘stick to it’ or was it not a workable lifestyle approach? I never refer to my eating as a ‘diet’, rather that it is a lifestyle approach, so therefore any form of eating approach I take, has to be workable in my life – I try not to let it all consume me, but so often I find that to be unavoidable!
    Is one eating approach or ‘method’ or ‘diet’ really the best? I don’t enjoy eating, and I see my food simply as fuel for my body (I like to do a lot of physical training – particularly running marathons etc) and I suppose I struggle with what will be fuel my body, but also nourish it and take care of it. From a running perspective high carbs – of the ‘good’ variety are encouraged, but that is not something that works for my body. I feel like I am on the merry-go-round of healthy eating and the horse goes up and down like the try this/try that messages that are out there.
    At what point do you personally stop hearing these messages from ‘people’ and just start ‘listening’ to your own body and get off the merry-go-round and just do what works for you? And are you too quick to jump back on the ride and try the ‘latest’ or ‘newly discovered’ approach? As a society we are quick to jump into the ‘new’ or ‘latest’ that we often don’t give something long enough to make a good base/establishment of something that we started.

  • Alex

    There is paleo stuff all over the food blogs I read but I’m not yet totally convinced. I’m not sure what the difference is between paleo and every other diet trend or fad or ‘lifestyle change’.

    To me it’s pretty obvious why I eat carbs instead of meat + veggies for every meal – they taste good, give me energy, fill me up, and are a lot cheaper to pad out my meals than grass-fed organic meat 3 times a day. I would find it extremely difficult and boring to sustain eating paleo for the rest of my life. If you google a bit you’ll find a lot of people can’t keep up a low-carb paleo diet long term and it has actually harmed them. This guy’s experience provides an interesting counterbalance imo: http://180degreehealth.blogspot.com/2011/06/paleo-fail.html

    There ends my $0.02!

    [Reply]

    Jane Reply:

    It’s a shame that this person doesn’t site any scientific studies, relying instead on his another person’s personal cirucumstances.

    What we should be doing is eating good, wholesome food – and yes I eat primal and will for the rest of my life.

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    Alex Reply:

    I have no doubt that lots of people do great eating primal – I just find a lot of reductionism in the primal/paleo community which bothers me. Just because my genetic material is whatever percent similar to my next door neighbours does not mean we will both be optimally healthy eating meatza every day. And I wish there was an acknowledgement of the inherent privilege necessary to make these choices. To me discussions about food need to go further than nutrition alone.

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    annemarie Reply:

    Totally agree with you Alex. I think a lot of people throw their hat into the paleo ring because ultimately they want to loose weight. Most food fads are a safe-house for eating disorders.

    Furthermore, the Paleo diet has nothing to say for vegetarians, except eat meat because neanderthal man did. Feel ok about killing animals because eating their dead bodies is good for you.

    Mia Reply:

    Where did you get that from annemarie? I’ve read quite a few posts on how to adapt a paleo diet for vegetarians. It’s certainly out there!

    Ivy Reply:

    I cook an enormous array of dishes, no change of me getting bored with my paleo diet any time soon. The day I feel crap is the day I’ll quit. But 16 weeks in and I feel the best I ever have in my life.

    And yes, vegetarian primal does exist. :)

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    Ashley Reply:

    thank you for that. its so important to remember that everyone is different.

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  • j

    Hi Sarah
    Thanks for another interesting article.
    I’ve been thinking about you recently and hoping you’d comment somewhere in relation to the current political/media debate regarding the introduction of a “fat tax”, that would increase the tax of foods with high fat content (which, as far as I understand it, includes animals fats such as in dairy). None of the commentary that I can find discusses taxes on high sugar content, and, given your views on what it is that actually makes us unhealthy/fat (ie sugar not fat) just interested in what your take on this is / whether you feel strongly about it.
    Thanks
    J

    [Reply]

    Ivy Reply:

    We might be a decade away from officially learning that good fats are good or us, while wheat and sugar are the real culprits in our poor modern diets. I’m disappointed about the fat-tax, they’ll soon see that it won’t help with the obesity-rates!

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  • Mia

    For sensible and non-dogmatic information, Mark’s Daily Apple is the go-to place. Or buy his book, The Primal Blueprint. He is awesome, and I absolutely love his idea of seeing foods on a sort of spectrum instead of black and white, some foods can be included in moderation if you like but aren’t the best for you. Things like dairy, potatoes and rice fall under this heading. If you get too dogmatic about eating, you will burn yourself out and get bored, which is why paleo can be awesome.

    There are a lot of paleo purists on the internet who really shit me, to be honest. It’s just about eating whole, natural food. If you get too caught up in carb percentages, macronutrient ratios, and weighing your food – ugh! No! It’s turning the whole thing into a fussy diet when it shouldn’t be. Just eat real food, and you’ll be fine.

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    Alex Reply:

    I love this Mia, think I have been reading too many paleo purists who eat only pemmican for 2 years straight and it’s clouded my views a bit!

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    Mia Reply:

    Ha ha, I’ve read him too so I know what you mean! Who does that? I mean, aside from being totally boring and a terrible dinner guest… wouldn’t you be incredibly gassy? Ew.

    I tend to avoid the fundamentalists in EVERYTHING, not just diet. From religion, food, politics to which footy team you follow, all unfortunately have people who take it way too far with the details. People like Mark Sisson are cool, and not weirdly fundamentalist. You just need to know where to look… and where to avoid. I’m only Paleo-ish cos I kind of took the information and found a way of eating that worked for me, I dont follow it to the letter.

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    Ann Reply:

    I totally agree with avoiding fundamentalists in everything! And you are right about not making it more complicated than it needs to be. I really do think that Mark’s books and blog are right on, not too extreme, still allow for individual differences, and support everyone in trying to make the best choices they can (given time, money, etc). For people who want to learn a bit more, or need to know more (ie. my husband is a Type 1 diabetic who uses a pump and needed lots of detailed info before he could begin this little experiment), I think Robb Wolf’s book and blog is good for a more didactic look at how the lifestyle actually works. After watching me do this for 6 months, my husband decided to read Robb’s book and follow Paleo for 30 days. In 2 weeks, his insulin usage dropped 50%! That’s huge!

    Ivy Reply:

    I love marks daily apple! I’m on there daily and use the forum alot. I hear a lot of the users say that other paleo sites are far more rigid. I love Marks relaxed approach to food: it should be a joy to eat it, and that’s how I feel. I will never count calories again, life is too short! :)

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    GiGi Reply:

    I agree. I read (somewhere) that the way bread was made, even 40 years ago, was so much different to the way it’s made today and that this is what is contributing to the huge increase in coeliac (1 & 2). I wonder if we all ate bread made the old way – proved for ages; and not rushed through in order to increase profits; and not full of crap to decrease costs – if we would tolerate it better as the gluten content of old-fashioned bread is so much lower. I think for most of us the damage is already done and any trace of gluten is now way too much – damn those greedy bread makers!

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  • Ann

    @New Commenter: Try cutting down slowly. If you go too suddenly off the carb merry-go-round you may get what is referred to as the “low carb flu” as your body struggles to adapt. As far as being hungry, you may need to add in some good fats like avocado and olive oil, as well as coconut oil or coconut milk. Adding sardines is a good way to get in more protein. Once your body switches over to using fats for fuel instead of carbs, you won’t get as hungry and you won’t want to snack as much (blood glucose levels don’t rollercoaster when you are off the carbs/sugars).

    @Cindy: I have found that nearly all of my IBS and bloating are completely gone since going Paleo, so happy to report that in my case it hasn’t had a negative effect!

    @Lena and Maryann: Mia’s link to Mark’s Daily Apple is a good one. Good fats and meat do not equal increased cholesterol. Actually, once most people go Paleo, their cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as blood glucose decrease significantly.

    @Amanda: I eat seasonally and with joy, surrounded by my friends and family (husband and 2 children), I am finally healthy and happy and no longer suffer from IBS, horrible fatigue and musculoskeletal pain which prevented me from being active and socially involved. Truly, I loved bread and cereal, and I am Italian and ate pasta my whole life, but nothing would make me go back to feeling the way I did 2 years ago. I have balance in my life now that I have the energy to go hiking with my family again, and we recently returned to rockclimbing, which I had to give up a few years ago.

    Of course everyone has to do what they feel is right. For those that are interested, and do have issues such as autoimmune diseases, high cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes, there is a wealth of free information out there explaining the Paleo/Primal way. Read it all and see if it makes sense for you. And there is nothing to be afraid of….you will still have adequate food supplies ;) The best way to do it is to follow the recommendations for 30 days and see how you feel. Make your own informed choice.

    For more info see: http://robbwolf.com/faq/

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  • Kate

    If you are interested in paleo but can’t imagine dinner without grains (like me!), I highly recommend this blog http://nomnompaleo.com/. She has fantastic recipes – really easy and tasty, and lots of slow cooker ideas.

    [Reply]

    Lou Reply:

    I love nom nom paleo! Cauliflower fried rice is awesome!

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  • Selena

    Hi, Just wondering about rice? As a gluten-free, egg-free and dairy-free person…I eat a fair bit of rice and rice pasta.

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  • http://holistichealingandcfs.wordpress.com/ amy

    I am so happy I have found your site! I suffer from ME/CFS and have made very similar diet, lifestyle, environmental changes since being diagnosed 2 years ago. I become grain free about 16 months after hearing about a treating biologist bill giles who undertakes grain and fructose free trials with his patients in canberra. I went completely cold turkey off them and it was sooo hard initially. I was a major sugar/carb burner previously and had hypoglycemia if I didn’t eat every 2 hours I would begin shaking, feeling faint, my cfs symptoms would exacerbate further and I would get extremely emotional. This has completely vanished and my digestion improved. Making changes in my diet has been gradual though, I can see how it could be daunting for someone to just suddenly become hardcore paleo! I already ate a very clean, organic, non-processed diet. I cut out grains, then fructose was a problem, then I realised nut, seeds and legumes were very taxing on my digestion and found they are mostly pro-imflammatory because of their high omega 6 ratio and contain many of the same anti-nutrients. I have always been allergic to dairy so that was out, but I wish I could have raw goats milk!! I began reading about paleo, evolutionary diets, nourishing traditions, body ecology, gaps diet, weston a price, blogs like marks daily apple, chris kresser, hunt gather love, archevore and loren codains Grains: the double edged sword article, plus many more! This is over many months, but it all just made soo much sense to me. I definately think you need to find what works for you. If you feel better on some grains/seeds then try to soak, sprout or ferment. I also found out about haiga white rice. If you really want to have rice this is the healthiest version. Without the bran, but with the germ still intact! I am personaly still experimenting with what works for me. At times I will have quite a lot of starchy vegetables with non starch and other times only non starch. Quite high fat and moderate protein. Thanks for the post! and good luck!
    Thanks for the post!

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  • K

    Hi,
    I love this website….Sarah you have inspired me to live a sugar free life!!! Eliminating Sugar not only made me a nicer person, but I no longer suffer from anxiety and my head doesn’t feel fuzzy anymore.
    Kudo’s on the e-book, love the design!!
    I too have discovered that life is much better without grains, I don’t feel heavy or bloated anymore. I do eat Qinoa for Breakfast though because I can’t eat eggs…anyone got an alternative????

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    Hi K

    I can’t eat eggs either and this makes things tricky. I’ve had bacon with mushrooms, spinach & tomato. Smoked salmon is also good. Sometimes I have them with gluten free toast. Yoghurt is probably good too but I can’t eat/tolerate yoghurt either. Goat or sheep feta is good too.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    Fruit like Frozen Berries with Coconut Cream is good (Get the Ayam Brand as it has no additives)

    Or a smoothie.. Water, Avocado, raw cacao, egg white protein powder and an extra ripe frozen banana is delicious. Or Almond butter instead of the avo, or Berries instead of the Banana, so many possibilities.

    Also, Paleo doesn’t have to be low/no carb. As an endurance athlete I eat Paleo, and get my carbs from Fruit and Sweet Potato

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    I like your idea of berries with coconut cream, Amy. I was actually just reading in Mark’s Daily Apple about brekkies and someone suggestion a smoothie with coconut milk/cream. Nice alternative for summer too! :-)

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    Dont eat raw egg whites, as they contain a protein called avidin, which is another antinutrient. I put 2x egg yolks in my smoothies and cook up the whites in an omlette instead, as cooking breaks down the antinutrient in the white. Raw egg yolks are fine. :)

    [Reply]

    Paula Reply:

    Nothing stopping you from having chicken for breakfast! I alternate it with eggs. Add half an avocado and some sauteed cherry tomatoes – yum!

    I also have sheeps milk yoghurt with stewed berries and some homemade grain free granola (nuts, seeds & coconut)

    [Reply]

    Lou Reply:

    I have steak for breakfast! Truly, it feels amazing, and if I don’t have if before I work out, I will eat everything in sight after my workout! Add in a tbsp of nut butter (not peanut as hey are legumes) for fat as well!

    Green smoothies are also great, loads of spinach, small banana, blueberries, cinnamon, chia, a scoop of protein powder and coconut milk (Ayam do an organic unsweetened one) and I am good to go! Freeze the fruit for an extra frosty/thick shake, or add ice!

    [Reply]

  • K

    Thankyou Rosie : )

    [Reply]

  • http://oneaprilmorning.net Laura

    I have successfully cut out grains, and I am currently in the process of cutting out sugar.

    Next will have to be potatoes. Noo…

    [Reply]

    Ivy Reply:

    Replace with sweet-potato. Better for you. :)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Apparently sweet potato is out too, according to paleo eating. Definitely better than normal potatoes (lots of nutrients ) but still starchy : ) xx

    [Reply]

  • Nadia

    Another fad diet. Thanks Sarah :/

    [Reply]

    Paula Reply:

    Nah – it’s not a fad. I live this way and will for the rest of my life. And I find that a good thing!

    [Reply]

    Ivy Reply:

    Same!

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    me too! If you have any understanding of biochemistry and physiology, and you do some research into this lifestyle, you will no doubt be convinced too. If not, try it for a month and see what happens.

    [Reply]

  • Mia

    Interesting diet indeed. Nora is very passionate about this and you were very good in leading the chat and summarising what she said in a way we could all understand.

    AND, you have cut down on ummmmms. Makes the listening experience much more enjoyable.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    thank yoiu!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.180nutrition.com.au/blog Guy

    Looking forward to seeing Nora speak in Sydney and mixing with like minded folk!

    [Reply]

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  • Jenna

    Sarah, this was a fantastic. I much prefer listening to reading so brilliant for people like me :)

    I’m not sure if you have conducted other podcasts, but if so, are you able to create a section above under ‘topics’ and post them there?

    [Reply]

  • Teha

    “I’ll be at the Goldie to see her speak. It will be rad”. – are you going to schoolies week too while you’re there??

    Last week it was quitting sugar, today caveman eating. Only thing left now is the Karen Carpenter diet!

    [Reply]

    Lou Reply:

    Quitting sugar is part of the paleo diet.

    [Reply]

  • Karen

    I have lost 14 kilos and gained a new lifestyle after six months paleo. Bear in mind not all paleo advocates are low carb, some follow a natural Pacific style diet for example with root veggies being prominent. Personally I have phased safe carbs back in slowly as I approach goal weight.

    [Reply]

  • Jen

    Sarah, I have been paleo/primal for nearly a year now, after 18 years as a vegetarian. Although I never had any significant health problems before, I definitely have more energy, I never get a 3pm slump nor the water retention that often associates itself with a lot of carbs. My skin is amazing due to the higher fat content, my hair grows faster and I can go for hours and skip meals without thinking about food because the protein and fat fills me up.
    I don’t think of it as a ‘low carb diet’, its more the adoption of the practice of eating minimally processed food and food filled with additives.
    As you are already sugarfree it won’t be nearly as tough for you to give up the grains as it is for some others.

    My tips are:
    Don’t get hooked on ‘paleo friendly’ versions of traditionally high-carb foods eg, coconut bread, brownies, almond flour pizza bases etc. It just perpetuates cravings for the ‘real’ version of these foods and these substitutes tend to be very high in calories.
    Fill up on salad and veges with each meal to avoid overindulging in protein and fats.
    Only eat when you are hungry, you don’t need to snack as much.
    Remember that being paleo or primal is only partly about food – sleep, exercise, play, and stress avoidance are also a big part of the picture.
    I generally achieve 80/20 compliance (my 20% is certain social situations, travelling etc).

    Good luck :)

    [Reply]

  • Vegan

    Is it possible for this eating plan to provide enough nutrients/energy for vegans and lactose & milk protein intolerant people?

    Also, any advice on how to sneak fat into foods for someone who does not enjoy the taste of fatty things (avocado, nuts, oils)? I would simply prefer a salad dressed with lime juice not oil.

    [Reply]

  • Elle

    I am interested in the environmental implications of this paleo eating, given the high impact of meat and dairy production. Global warming is the biggest issue this generation has faced, and cows particularly due to their methane production, and animals more generally, given the water and other input associated with their production, contribute a great deal to environmental issues.. I haven’t noticed any comments on here in relation to this. What are people’s thoughts?

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Hi Elle,

    An excellent book to read – “The Vegetarian Myth” by Lierre Keith. It is written by a lady who was a vegan for 20yrs and has since realised that some thoughts on the lack of sustainability of the meat industry are in fact false. While grain-based meat production is cause for concern, pasture-raised beef can actually improve the environment. Check it out – massive eye-opener!

    [Reply]

    Elle Reply:

    Thanks Kate,
    I don’t mention the environmental impacts of meat-eating lightly – I grew up in a farming community, have worked in an abattoir (processor of ‘free range’ meat), studied environmental science, and worked in the environmental sector in areas which intersected with agriculture.
    A quick google of The Vegetarian Myth gave the first link as a ‘debunking’ of some of Keith’s own myths, and while I didn’t necessarily like the rebuttal I wasn’t too convinced by the extracts of Keith’s writing either. But I shall search it out and see what it offers.

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    @Elle It’s the feedlot raised cattle are more likely to create concentrated methane production (and contribute to environmental problems). Nora advocates grass-fed sustainably raised meat consumed in moderate amounts. (Nora is not typical Paleo – I think she refers to her way as “Beyond Paleo” as paleolithic principles are a starting place) BIG agribusiness is what’s destroying our precious planet. Not grass fed cows.

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    Elle, I agree with Lisa on this one. Feedlot cattle, along with the grains they are being fed is a big issue that is having a huge effect on the environment. We have had discussions/comments about this previously and Mia linked us to an interesting article regarding this very topic.

    [Reply]

  • Blue22

    I ate this way for about eight years – although did have muesli for breakfast most of that time (oats, nuts and seeds). Anyway I felt great and thought I was super healthy until I did one of those BIA tests, which showed some serious issues. I didn’t take much note to be honest – too cocky, after all I was eating the perfect diet. Although I ate loads of fats my BMI hit 17, my digestive and reproductive systems shut down and I suffered from hives, gloating, constipation, and incredible lethargy. After a year of misery I included some whole grains in my diet, gained some weight and magically was healed. I now have a gorgeous son and feel fantastic. I am still sugar free but eat museli every day and moderate amounts of whole grains, legumes, quinoa etc. I can honestly day that I thought in was doing everything right so to find myself infertile and chronically unwell was a wake up call!

    [Reply]

    Claire Reply:

    Arghhh, I was so excited to start on this diet only to hear this. I am 28 years of age and to learn that this diet could play a part in infertility does cause some concern.

    Can anyone shed light on this? Thoughts?

    xx

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    How could not eating processed grains ruin your fertility? If it did, humans would have died out hundreds of thousands of years ago. Most humans hadn’t even heard of grains until less than 10,000 years ago (around 1000 years or less in some places, like Wales) and we certainly did fine reproducing up until then.

    Most people with PCOS, endometriosis and other fertility disorders feel better on a diet that isn’t high in carbs. Stable insulin generally means less health problems overall, and this includes fertility. Paleo-style eating has been the best thing I ever did for my health – autoimmune disease AND fertility issues.

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-nutrition-and-fertility/

    [Reply]

    Ivy Reply:

    Claire, I hear far more stories on people becoming fertile after cutting grains and sugar than the other way around. I think health issues linked to diet are extremely individual. Paleo will never be optimal unless you also cover the trace-minerals and certain vitamins. Eg it’s hard to make use of all the meat in your diet if you’re low on iodine.

    [Reply]

  • Lou

    Everyones body is different and we need to eat according to our own needs – to find our own “right for me” approach to eating. I find a diet rich in meat and low in grains heavy and horrible. I feel sluggish and get constipated. I feel my best eating minimal amounts of meat, oily fish, some full fat dairy, lots of different whole grains and legumes, tones of vegies and some fruit. I avoid processed foods, additives, preservatives and sugar. I aim for a 90/10 approach – 90% whole foods and 10% treats (which I hardly eat but is mostly a little bit of chocolate). And I exercise 5 times a week – mostly by riding my bike and swimming.

    Did you know that a diet that includes large amounts of red meat and processed meat is a risk factor for bowel cancer and lung cancer. http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Bowel_cancer.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11557111

    Also a high protein diet based on meat products can increase the risk of heart disease, however a high protein diet based on vegetable products (legumes etc) can lower heart disease risk.

    Lastly anti-inflammatory foods (oily fish mostly but also alkaline foods – buckwheat, navy beans, spelt, lentils, etc) can raise your mood. There is research into these foods and depression on The Black Dog Institute website.

    Lou

    Lou

    [Reply]

    Ivy Reply:

    Lou, all the so-called research on meat-heavy diets do not specify or differentiate between processed meats (bad!) and unprocessed grass-fed beef (good and high in Omega3). They also don’t specify how much processed bread/wheat was served with the so-called red meat. Nor do they specify what sort of fats (trans, hydrogenated, PUMA and Imega6, anyone?). So as a paleo I cannot even consider that research until someone check long-term health from eating clean paleo, not just their dodgy definition of “red meats”.

    Grains and legumes helped me develop leaky gut. So we all have our own journey to discover when it comes to food-choices.

    [Reply]

  • Ivy

    For those of you that are paleo already, check out http://www.jackkruse.com and read his blog. I especially recommend his post in the Top Ten Supplements list for optimal paleo results! He’s a difficult read but I feel like his take on primal and his supplement-advise is what fixed me, more than anything else. I have actually never stopped craving sugar, but once I took his Leptin-approach to paleo, it was like I finally shut off that constant urge.

    [Reply]

  • Lou

    http://www.easyph.com.au/journal-articles

    Hi Sarah
    Please go to this website and read the research articles before you start. I do not believe a high animal based protein diet is healthy and worry for you. You have been concerned about your body being acidic in the past and meat is highly acidic.

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    Alkalinity does NOT = health.

    Bulimics will have a very alkaline system. So will a person who is about to have a heart attack. The idea that the more “alkaline” you are the healthier you are, is a scam.

    Lemons are also highly acidic, yet the effect on the body is slightly alkaline due to the mineral content. There is no proof that meat makes the body more “acidic” overall. Even if it did, the idea that anyone would live on meat alone and not partake in vegetables, is a little extreme, and really nothing to do with the Paleo way of wating whatsoever.

    What is actually important, is to have your body at a pH that is right for homeostasis, and this varies depending on which part of the body you are talking about.

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    I’ve often wondered about the acid/alkaline thing too Mia. Not quite sure it’s all it’s cracked up to be. Mind you, I think I read somewhere that once upon a time when our meat sources were grass fed as they were supposed to be they naturally had more omega 3 as opposed to omega 6 which they have these days (due to being grain fed) and therefore more alkaline. But I dunno…. still searching… I think basically sticking to a more natural diet, with what ever works for your own body. Strange we didn’t have to worry about diets and alkalinity a good while back.

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    Dont get me wrong, alkaline veggies & fruits are awesome, but its not a complete picture. There is more to keeping healthy than that!

    Raz Reply:

    Lou please read my below post to natalie, as we all
    Need to read up as much as we can.
    Any acid meat issues are easily resolved with some fresh or frozen berries and warm water with lemon juice.

    [Reply]

  • http://oneaprilmorning.net Laura

    I spoke to my GP yesterday and he is a big proponent of paleo eating! He doesn’t call it paleo, but everything he says is in line with Nora (eat lots of animal protein, fats, vegetables… no sugar [inc fruit], no grains). So nice to know that the Australian medical community is keeping up!

    Oh and he gave me a great, great tip. Very simple but I had never thought of it before! He said that most women get hungry when they get home from work at 5-6pm and again around 8-9pm – which is when most naughty eating takes place. So his advice is to cook dinner, serve it up, halve it… eat half at 5-6 and the other half at 8. Stops the evening sugar cravings. Clever!

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Laura – who is your doctor and where is he? He sounds like a smart man!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Hi Kate – he is a Perth doctor! If you’re in Perth you can contact me via my blog (just go to “Author’s Statement” and you’ll find my email address there). I’m happy to give you the info he gave me as well, very similar to paleo eating concepts. Thank you! xx

    [Reply]

  • Natalie

    Seriously, I can’t take it anymore. You hop on each and every bandwagon. Every week you chop and change, this/that/the other avoid/eat/scary/paleo etc. etc. You always said how much you loved quinoa, how great you felt eating it – now you’re ditching it. What about listening to your body? Your own individual constitution?

    I’m all for soaking grains before we eat them, but honestly – I can tell you’re about to ditch legumes too, because of the latest health “expert” you’ve come into contact with. What about your course? What did it teach you about all of this?

    Everyone is trying to sell a book. Everyone is trying to sell something.

    [Reply]

    Ann Reply:

    @Natalie: You can always stop reading the blog. I’m just sayin’.

    [Reply]

    Claire Reply:

    Natalie, I feel your comment is somewhat harsh. I love reading Sarahs site and like all of us she is growing and learning new things on her path! Let it be!

    [Reply]

    Raz Reply:

    I’m sorry but you are completely ill-informed! I would suggest reading up on Paleo/ Primal as the science, research and results are undeniable.

    Must reads are:
    The Paleo Solution
    Good Calorie, Bad Calorie

    And FREE websites:
    Robb Wolf
    Mark’s Daily Apple
    Loren Cordain

    These professionals are trying to ‘sell’ you a book because you have been completely wrongly educated, and this is one way to get the truth to the general population.
    And, actually all these people have FREE websites full of EVERY bit of information you need to know…because in the end it’s not about money for them, it’s about every human
    beings right to correct information and education… and a healthy life!

    [Reply]

  • Nikic

    Hi Sarah,

    I love the concept of this “diet” but have a question that hopefully someone can answer.

    I had my gall bladder removed a year ago. I have cut out carbs and grains out of my diet and have concentrated on protein and fats but that has just sent my stomach into an overhaul. BEcause I don’t have the gall bladder to break down the fats I get really bad stomach cramps from fats and eggs especially unless it’s eaten with some sort of carb (breat, potatoe rice or pasta) to help absorb some of that fat.

    Any thoughts or advise on that?

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Hi Nikic,

    You can still have fats, but a couple of supplements may help with the digestion of them:
    1) Ox-bile, which is a bile-salt supplement, will help emulsify the fats to make them more accessible to the enzymes for breakdown and therefore allow you to get more nutrient content and also lessen the stress on your digestive system. You can buy these from here – http://www.iherb.com/Nutricology-Ox-Bile-500-mg-100-Veggie-Caps/3451?at=0
    2) Enzyme supplement – Nowfoods Superenzymes is really good for digestive health. In your case it will be especially beneficial as it contains lipases, which break down fats. Note that this supplement also has Ox-bile extract, so you could also just go with this supplement if you didn’t want to get the Ox-bile by itself. You can buy it here – http://www.vitatree.com.au/c/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=55

    In terms of carbs, try and stick with ones that aren’t going to cause any more inflammation in your system, such as sweet potato and pumpkin. Also make sure you chew your food well to aid digestion, and avoid having too much liquid with your meals as this will dilute your digestive enzymes and make digestion more inefficient.

    Hope this helps!

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    Hi Sarah,

    I just wanted to say thank you for spreading the word on the paleo diet. I am currently studying nutrition and dietetics at uni and unfortunately they are still teaching the age-old dogma of “grains good-fat bad”. It is quite sad and frustrating to have to instil this information (to pass exams) in your mind when you know better. There are so many other vested interests out there that are going to prevent this way of life from becoming mainstream (agriculture, government, pharmaceuticals to name a few). When people such as yourself, who have such a large following, spread this knowledge and it is received so well by the majority, it really excites me. So thank you, from the bottom of my heart, for putting your name behind such a currently controversial lifestyle, which will no doubt improve the health and well-being of thousands (hopefully more) of people. You are a rock-star!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.matildaraynolds.com Matilda

    Hi Sarah, Thank you firstly for continuing to share your insights and for often being the guine pig with some of these new methods…. My question to anyway out there is can you live of the Paleo diet whilst being an elite athlete – I’m talking over 16 sessions a week of swimming, riding and running??

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Hi Matilda,

    While I wouldn’t say I am an elite athlete, I am a group fitness instructor and personal trainer, which means I do around 10 hours of exercise per week. You definitely can follow this lifestyle. I’ve actually noticed an increase in my performance since switching. I’m assuming that most of your activity is endurance-based, where fat is actually the preferred fuel, so make sure you get plenty of good fats (coconut, avocado etc). You would also probably benefit from more carbs than most t but get these from natural sources such as sweet potatos and pumpkins and a bit of fruit. Also, try to have these types of carbs post-workout when your glucose uptake (for glycogen repletion) is more efficient and less reliant on insulin.
    One caution – if you do adopt this style of eating, you may notice a bit of a dip in energy and performance for the first few weeks, but then you’ll come good. So maybe don’t start the diet around the time of a competition.

    Hope this helps!

    [Reply]

    Matilda Reply:

    Thanks Kate – Now I just need the courage to do this! We are coming into racing now so I may not be able to go to extreme. I have completely cut out sugars but am still having things like corn, millett and rice. I guess getting rid of these things is the next step. Thanks for your reply!!

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Absolute pleasure!

    Lou Reply:

    Many crossfitters follow this way of eating, and if you have seen their bodies and capacity, the the results speak for themselves. Just make sure you are getting enough fuel. I hope you’re throwing around some weights in that program!

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    I found a blog post from Nora on protein requirements:
    http://www.primalbody-primalmind.com/?p=295

    [Reply]

  • http://conceptuelle.tumblr.com Rachel

    I eat paleo but a modified version…after a few months low carb my energy went low again and I had edema.

    Then I cut out most veggies, upped the fruit hardcore (like…durians and cocos for breakfast and lunch) and have bone broth and fish for dinner. Sugar phobia is just as bad as the raw vegan fat phobia! We need fruits for vitamin C and hydration and we need fish and meat for collagen, nerves etc!

    [Reply]

  • EmilyKate

    I’m so glad you got to speak to Nora! I saw she was coming to Australia but alas not to Melbourne.
    I’ve been transitioning to paleo over some months- first went gluten, then sugar, now grains and next legumes will go. The slow gradual approach has worked well for me, and I’ve given myself time to adjust and the gradual progress has made me excited fir each new state instead of apprehensive.

    [Reply]

  • http://carbis.com.au/ Talia

    This is a really, really, interesting podcast. Nora seems to have an interesting perspective on food. I think this makes a lot of sense. If I think about it, my cravings are for carbs (I’m sugar free), and I DO feel full after eating some meat. Going to give this a bit of a try this week!

    I would be really interested in listening to someone talk about food and pregnancy. I’m pregnant at the moment and would love to hear a take on all these different ways of eating, and how they effect the growing fetus, and the pregnant body (as obviously the goal is not to loose weight, and really the focus just on feeding bubs). :-)

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Hey Talia,

    You can find lots of info on robbwolf.com if you search pregnancy/breastfeeding etc, but another excellent blog and possibly more relevant to you is everydaypaleo.com run by Sarah Fergoso. Hope this helps!

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    Read this! http://hawaiianlibertarian.blogspot.com/2011/05/paleo-baby.html

    One couple’s experience eating Paleo while the wife was pregnant. VERY encouraging!

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    That’s awesome! Thanks for sharing, Mia!

    [Reply]

  • http://kimonoreincarnate.blogspot.com Melanie

    We (my husband and I) eat mostly paleo and I feel so much better when I’m on it. I’m coeliac and at my last visit to my gastroenterologist I bashfully explained my current diet (I’m worried that people, especially my doctors, will think it a bit radical) and she was so pleased and excited. She, with her medical specialty believes that it’s really the way we should eat and her and her husband (a GP) only eat paleo.

    I also find that it helps reduce some of my Hashimoto symptoms, especially the inflammation and controlling (currently losing) the weight.

    When I first went on it, the hardest thing I found was giving up the sugar, and you’ve already done that, so should find it a breeze.

    OK, so I’m off to listen to the podcast now.

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Hi Melanie,

    Where in Australia are you? Could you possibly provide the names of your GP and gastro as we are always on the hunt for medical professionals who are clued-in on their nutrition.

    Thanks,

    Kate

    [Reply]

  • http://kimonoreincarnate.blogspot.com Melanie

    Hi Kate

    I’m in Brisbane. Are you up this way?

    [Reply]

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  • elle

    This sounds interesting and I would like to try. But I just read the quit sugar ebook and am confused as it contains tips for replacing sugar with certain carbohydrate foods like almond butter on ricecakes, oats w coconut milk etc. Is it better to cut out sugar and keep the carbs while you do it or stop carbs and sugar at once?
    Also I drink a lot of tea and decaf coffee with soy milk but read about soy milk being bad, yet paleo advocates avoiding dairy? Is this right? What milk should i drink!? haha

    [Reply]

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  • http://www.kristinemiles.com Kristine

    Having been strictly gluten free for some years now (about wheat free prior to this), I find even gluten free grains bung my guts up also (although gluten gives me terrible sinus congestion and gas…nice!!). I find quinoa is great. Never makes my gut heavy, and though I don’t eat it daily, if I eat it on consecutive days it is still fine (unlike rice). Always rinse it to get rid of the saponins which only coat the seeds, and if you have time, soak overnight with a squeeze of lemon juice, to release the anti-nutrient content like protease inhibitors which stop it growing in a dry dormant state.

    [Reply]

  • Raz

    I am strict Paleo and it is the best choice i have ever made!!! It is almost beyond belief how amazing I feel! I am completely free of previous horrible IBS, eczema, acne and hard to loose love handles!

    It really is an easy way to live! I look forward to a delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner everyday, and there are endless substitute options for grains, sugar etc, so stop making excuses. I just made Paleo Chocolate birthday cake and it was amazing!

    I strongly urge everyone who wants to feel strong, healthy and happy EVERYDAY to read Robb Wolf’s ‘The Paleo Solution’…and make a choice to feel beautiful and healthy inside, which will shine through!!!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.drronehrlich.com Dr Ron Ehrlich

    a great chat Sarah with Nora. We have been recommending Nora’s book to our patients at SHDC and they have reported improvements in so many ways ranging from weight loss, normalising blood pressure, arthritis, irritable bowel and even endometriosis….these aren’t conditions that we set out to treat in our everyday dental practice.
    BTW I love your book “I Quit Sugar”… an easy and fun read with SO much great information.

    Looking forward to catching up with you at Nora’s seminar real soon!
    Dr Ron:)

    [Reply]

  • GiGi

    Hi Sarah – and thanks to everyone who has shared their stories and informative comments.
    OK, so I really want to be able to do this paleo-thing. I’ve managed gluten-free, low-lactose for years; and sugar-free for about three months. I eat mostly organic and free-range and almost no processed foods. But, I’m not sure if I can do NO carbs. I often have eggs and bacon for breakfast, fish and salad for lunch and chicken and vegies for dinner; but I just get peckish for carbs (GF, sugar-free, soy-free bread with butter) at around 10am, 3pm and 8pm. I’m sure this is just a habit, but if I do go from breakfast to lunch to dinner without a ‘carb snack’ I find that I can’t concentrate and I get a bit light-headed between the meals. So, what constitutes low-carb? I figure I’m having 200gr-300gr of carb a day. Is that way too much? Would 150gr cut it? Or does it need to be even less?
    Also, it’s mango season and I love a good mango. Even though I’m completely over my sugar addiction and have no desire for it at all, I find myself thinking about eating the one mango I have every couple of days longingly – well, addictively. Should I cut it out altogether and just stick with the fruit that doesn’t obsess me?
    Great website, BTW, I’ve been reading back from 2009 and it’s wonderful to see the change from the beginning to now.

    [Reply]

    Ivy Reply:

    Gigi, paleo isn’t low-carb, depends if you want to lose, gain or maintain weight. 150 gr of paleocarbs daily is fine for weight-maintenance. Sweet potato, rice, starchy tubers, berries, potato and some fruit are all considered good paleo-friendly sources of carbs. Personally I use berries and 1/2 banana as my evening-snack when I feel tired. I a stage on 60 gr carbs daily, but I have weight to shed too.

    [Reply]

    GiGi Reply:

    Thanks Ivy, that sounds good (I really should get the book and read it!). I could manage with 150grs of carbs. I’m going to try Sarah’s frozen coconut cream ‘ice cream’ idea with some fruit for supper, too.

    [Reply]

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  • Nic Chun

    I am new to this. I like the comments. Being part Chinese, I think that I have an inherent craving for rice. I can go a long while not having it, but all of a sudden, I have to eat it and sometimes in abundance. What about fruit? Is that classed as sugar?

    Mahalo. Nic

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