why the paleo diet works

Posted on December 11th, 2011

This week in Sunday Life I eat like a caveman

Of all the self-imposed guinea pig antics I’ve subjected myself to for this column, this week’s might be regarded as my bravest. For it entailed eating, oh-glory-be-yes, fat.

In a fat-fearful world, my no holds barred consumption of chicken skin, the crackling and the 3cm of subcutaneous tissue on my pork belly, several teaspoons of butter on my veggies, whole cups of full cream milk, chunks of ghee and avocado each day has freaked the innards out of most in my culinary orbit. And yet (boldly! fearlessly!) I’ve persevered with this particular experiment for three whole months.

Turn to the person to your left, and the one to your right. I’m betting one of you is making friends with your egg yolks right now, having picked up on what’s been dubbed the “paleo” or “caveman” diet. Images of loin clothes and bone gnawing aside, the diet boils down to something pretty innocuous: not eating anything fiddled with.

So, no grains, no additives, no sugar, no grain-fed meat, no mucked-around-with fat-reduced dairy.

And instead the unadulterated foods of our ice-age forebears. The subsequent claim is that doing so makes us healthier, thinner and live longer, a claim I had to test for myself.

For the bulk of our 2.6 million years on the planet our diet consisted of fat, meat and fibrous vegetables. Put simply, fat determined our survival. Ten thousand short years ago we started eating grains, gradually changing from fat-burning creatures to sugar and starch-burning ones. Which would be fine. Except our bodies have never adjusted – 99.9 per cent of our genes are the same as our caveman ancestors.

Grains by nature contain toxins in their husks (their only defense in the evolutionary chain) that we struggle to digest (ergo, bloating, gluten sensitivity, etc). Further, a grain-based diet signals “famine” to our primitive bodies – why else would we be resorting to the most energy inefficient, toxic food possible? Which is said to set off a domino of “coping mechanisms”, such as insulin, cholesterol and triglyceride spikes, as our bodies try to deal with a substance it has not evolved to ingest. The spiraling consequences of living grain-based lives is extensive, and backed by a fast-growing number of studies that show it’s making us fat and sick.

Now. I know, I know. All this turns the pyramid and the way you eat your cornflakes on its head. And it makes people angry. What do you mean we’ve been eating all wrong? We’re not meant to eat fat! Really? Who says?

On Saturday night I found myself at dinner with a bunch of paleos – two dentists, two farmers, a GP, some academics and the pin-up girl of paleo Nora Gedgaudas (at 50, she’s as toned and glowy as a young bride) whose authoritative and hyper-referenced tome Primal Body Primal Mind was my first introduction to the topic.

[Listen to my earlier podcast with Nora here.]

We ate the fish or the duck, poured oil over our asparagus and said no to the bread. We all drilled Gedgaudus, in Australia to speak at a series of Nourishing Australia conferences, on the guff all paleos tend to get drilled on. But didn’t cavemen only live to 30 – how can their diet be good? That was the average age, skewed by high infant mortality and death-by-charging-rhino, not diet. But don’t we need carbs for energy? No, it’s in fact the only food molecule that’s unnecessary for survival. Geez, all that saturated fat – it causes heart disease and high cholesterol! Again, no. The original study in the 1950s by scientist Ancel Keys that claimed as such was seriously flawed.

[To watch a video that explains this, click here.]

Since then studies have shown in just two weeks a saturated fat/paleo diet reduced cholesterol and triglycerides 30 points (equivalent to taking statins for six months).

My cholesterol dropped and I lost 2 kilos “going paleo”. But the most remarkable benefit has been its stickability. Once I’d escaped my sugar rollercoaster of yore and started eating 2-3 meals a day (fat satiates and so I now eat less) it just didn’t occur to me to “relapse” (carbs are addictive, so without them my cravings disappeared). Indeed, everyone around the table on Saturday had been grain-free for years, effortlessly. Which, to me, makes this whole caper less a diet and simply, innocuously, something that just makes sense.

This is a massive topic to cover in one column. I’ll be writing more about it in weeks to come, so feel free to post any questions or suggestions on the whole paleo thing below. I’ll also post a directory of doctors, dentists, farmers etc who support this way of living.

I know some of you might find it a little contentious…share! It’s a good discussion to have.

Also, stay tuned tomorrow. I’m making a big announcement…

 

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  • Kerrie

    Hi. I was just wondering if whole grains would be ok in the diet due to the fact they haven’t been interfered with (obviously in moderation)..

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    Marielize Reply:

    Hi Kerrie, there is good info about this on the evolutionary biologist dr Rose’s blog. Basically if you are middle Eastern decent, your ancestors have been exposed to grains for only 10 000 years – nothing in a evolutionary timeline. From there on it only get worse. If you are European maybe 2000 years, Irish and Scottish none at all as with the first nations.
    http://55theses.org/2011/06/17/diet-what-you-need-to-know-based-on-your-heritage/

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    Leigh Reply:

    I’ve read some things about Paelo Diet online which seems to say it is a diet very very high in meat. This seems strange to me as I’ve read ‘The China Study’ which gives a lot of evidence for a plant based diet being the very best diet for our health.

    Meat contains no fibre or antioxidants or phytonutrients etc so I’m confused as to why a diet extremely high in meat could possibly be cancer preventing or good for the bowel or create lovely clear skin or boost fertility or reduce yr risk of heart disease or reverse diabetes?

    Also, I’ve read that those who follow the Paleo way of eating restrict their fruit consumption. This also is surprising to me – I thought fruit was good for us? Fruit is full of fibre, nutrients, antioxidants etc so it’s healthy, isn’t it? I know Dr Joel Fuhrman says we should eat several pieces of fruit a day. What do you think? Can you help me understand why fruit could be bad for us and needs to be restricted?

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  • Laura

    You might want to check out ‘The China Study’, it highlights some of the risks associated with consuming animal protein.

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    CaveL Reply:

    debunked and seriously flawed! http://rawfoodsos.com/2010/07/07/the-china-study-fact-or-fallac/

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  • http://www.klrmarketing.com.au Grahame Rees

    Congratulations on your article Sarah.Most people write these stories as a 3rd party without trying the actual diet. Finding this way of eating has changed the life of my family and business partners. I started on this eating plan (no grains,sugar,) exactly 12 months ago on the 8th of December. I feel better than ever,I always used to get at least 1 or 2 colds or flu before, this year not one.I am 12 kg’s lighter, back to my old 21 year old weight (now 53).
    Was it easy ? Hell yeh !!
    Eat a good breakfast with eggs, and meat of some sort (grass fed).The way I see it is, as individuals we must seek out the truth for ourselves whether it comes to health, the environment, and the food we eat. Farmers are the Pharmacy of the future, we can actually do ok living in harmony with nature.
    Unfortunately as a society we leave decisions about the food we eat, including weight loss programs to good marketers rather than good advice. Great work Sarah.

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    Tamantha Reply:

    maybe you shouldnt eat purely for your own selfish greed (weight loss) but also think about the environment… or perhaps each animal you sacrifice so you can fit into ‘those’ jeans. by 2050 we will not be able to sustain our way of living if our population continues to grow at the rate it is. There will NOT be enough land to produce the animals so that us ‘greedy’ westerners can continue our ‘three meats a day’ diet… bring on heart disease!!! BOOYAH!

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    Sandra Reply:

    This lifestyle has nothing to do with “weight loss”, that just happens to be a side benefit. It has everything to do with healing your body and genes back to where they are meant to be and have a more efficient body that wards of the standard diseases in the Western world. If you are ok with diabetes, heart disease and cancer then continue on Western diet of today. BTW….studies show, like it is mentioned several times, that it is a myth that red meat causes heart disease.

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    deesal Reply:

    Totally agree with you Sandra!

    Debbie Reply:

    You have hit the nail on the head Tamantha…..selfish greed….unfortunatly that seems to be how most people live and what motivates them is their own personal needs and desires. I would like to see these people walk down a asile of chickens in cages that are too small for them to move more than one step…or stand for 5 minutes and watch a pig entrapped in it’s little piece of hell…where it can not even turn around..or see the madness in a dogs eye as it is force fed a product simply to test it….I would like to see these people witness what a caring person (vegan/vegetarian) makes it their business to witness and then…after these meat-eaters witness these crimes….still choose to be responsible for the harming or killing of an animal. But no…they would not want to see that…instead they will choose to hide away from the horror….They say….”I don’t want to know..it’s too horrible” and continue to eat that piece of meat that once had a face…that once had eyes that begged for freedom…or a mouth that wished it could talk so it could beg…and say “save me..please don’t kill me…please don’t eat me..please don’t take my baby…please..please don’t be so selfish”

    Sadly,….these meat-eaters don’t hear…they are too busy to listen…they are too busy worrying about their waist lines…or their greedy desires.

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    stoneagemom Reply:

    Most people eating Paleo go for an approach that utilizes humanely raised animals. Grassfed and pastured are ideal.

    Those poor rabbits, deer, and mice (by the millions, btw) being chopped up by combines harvesting your precious monoculture soy and wheat?

    Yeah, I prefer a farm with animals living in harmony with nature. Beef or buffalo eating the grass, chickens grazing in rotation behind them, the occassional goat.

    You cannot exist in a vaccumm. Life=death=life.

    Sandra Reply:

    Debbie,

    When you say “when they see what we caring people see” is a total insult and makes your whole point invalid. Your better than you attitude is what makes what you have to say totally inconsequential.

    Alex Reply:

    Tamantha, You won’t get heart disease simply by eating meat. You have been conned. And Debbie, your comments show such a contempt for normal people eating what they are designed for that I think you have lost all credibility.Why are you people even commenting on this site? You have a problem with farming practice? I accept that a lot can be done. But to call vegans/vegetarians caring people? I would just call them delusional people.

    Alex Reply:

    Debbie,

    You have a misplaced sense of compassion. There is nothing compassionate about not eating meat. We are, by virtue of our evolutionary path, meat eaters. We are at the top of the food chain, nature’s most magnificent predators and killers, and the success of our species has allowed for people like you to exist. Animals, including us, exist on this planet for a number of reasons, and one of them is to be food for other animals. If you find this to be a problem, then there is something very twisted about your sense of morality.
    I don’t know what you are doing following Sarah’s blog. She is a meat-eater as you may have gathered, and your lame moralising is not converting anybody to your pathetic lifestyle. It’s just pissing people off. Go away!

    Sophia Reply:

    You are grossly generalizing the carnivorous population. I wholeheartedly agree that commercially produced meat is an atrocity to all living things involved and disastrous to the environment, and I don’t eat commercially produced meats. But I do eat meat that has been raised myself or by friends, meat from animals that I have seen enjoying beautiful lives in beautiful pastures. I can reconcile myself ethically to eating this meat, but I respect your right to being vegetarian if you cannot reconcile your ethics to eating meat. And I expect you in turn to expect my choice to consume meat that has been ethically produced. Believe me, I have thought long and hard on this subject, and my choice is not a mindless one. So please stop assuming that all meat eaters are selfish, because that is simply not true.

    jan Reply:

    Ye gods Deborah you are a bit harsh. When I was studying nutrition I decided that I better try the vegetarian way and after a few months felt so tired and washed out. I heard many, many people say that they had tried to be a vegetarian and just got sicker and sicker. I heard that story, time and time again, including from my lecturer who was vegetarian for 2 years and my next door neighbour who was a doctor and saw the amount of heart disease first hand which is why he decided to go vegetarian. Vegetarian eating just does not suit everybody. I think that you will find that the people who follow this blog will mostly eat ethically farmed meat – free range poultry and free range and grass fed meat.

    Nick Reply:

    If we didn’t feed animals grain in feedlots then a lot of the environmental arguments fall away. Growing all that grain is what does most of the environmental damage.

    I thought this was a nice perspective, in Time Science. Somebody who avoided meat, then had a few realisations as a farmer and ecologist.

    http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2024133,00.html

    Danielle Chalmers Reply:

    I have just come across the Paleo diet and find it to be amazing.

    We are by nature omnivours – this means we need both meat and plant based materials to survive. Our bodies are designed to eat both of them. We are not Hebivores so our bodies are not deigned to just eat plant matter.

    I eat meat because I like meat, not because I do not understand what happens to the animals. I eat free range eggs, and chicken because I like the taste. I’m from New-Zealand and the majority of our beef, pork and lamb are humanly killed. The are raised in paddocks and eat grass. They do not live in cages.

    I think your comments about people being cruel for eating them are closed minded. We were designed to eat meat. I don’t hate lions because they hunt the antelope. It is what they were designed to do. Just as I was designed to eat a combination of meat and plant matter.

    Eugene Reply:

    Dear Danielle, I think being omnivores means that we’re designed with the option of eating animal and plant food, not that we require both. We can eat anything that gives us all the necessary nutrients – and it’s possible to do that without eating meat, and it’s especially easy with eggs & milk.

    I’m glad people like you are concerned about the animals living well – it makes a big difference.

    Mike Paleo Reply:

    An evolutionary diet is both environmentally friendly and entirely sustainable, it is THE healthiest way of eating and is focused on extensive farming. No pesticides, chemicals, additives, transporting products huge distances, packaging. Compare this to your standard intensively reared produce yukk! Eat natural dietary fat to live longer in optimal health…and nourish the brain.

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I didn’t do it for weight…but for health, balance AND sustainability reasons. Grahame above can attest to this. As some have mentioned, paleo is about eating pasture-fed, ethically raised meat, and the whole animal (not wasting meat). It’s a mindful approach. I will try to assemble a post on this subject…I can see it’s getting heated here and we need some good FACTS. Stay tuned

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    Tamantha Reply:

    I say nothing about “get heart disease by simply eating meat”… High cholesterol is actually the number one cause. Meat is high in cholesterol… see how 1 and 1 makes 2… I know there are many other ways to die, meat is not the only way… i am not conned, deluded, blinded or whatever other argument you will throw at me… Since I have become vegan I have had more energy and slept amazingly at night… It is the most compassionate way of living. I am sorry that this statement will offend some people… But I do not consider my tastebuds to be more important than an animals life. “If we could live happy healthy lives without harming others, then why wouldn’t we”~Edgars mission

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    Sandra Reply:

    Well Tamantha, cholesterol is a naturally occurring component in our bodies and we need it to live. Yes, red meat does have cholesterol in it but studies show it is not the read meat consumption but what is being eaten with it. The Western Diet in general is what the cause is.
    I can tell you unequivocally that since I have been eating the so called “paleo diet” that all of my numbers have gone down, I have more energy, I sleep amazingly at night and I have so much compassion for all that is around me that I do need to put others down to make myself feel better.
    You are entitled to your opinions and they are yours. Treasure them and believe in them but don’t feel it gives you the right to try to shame others because they do not feel they way you do.

    Alex Reply:

    Tamantha,

    You have a misplaced sense of compassion. There is nothing compassionate about not eating meat. We are, by virtue of our evolutionary path, meat eaters. We are at the top of the food chain, nature’s most magnificent predators and killers, and the success of our species has allowed for people like you to exist. Animals, including us, exist on this planet for a number of reasons, and one of them is to be food for other animals. If you find this to be a problem, then there is something very twisted about your sense of morality.
    I don’t know what you are doing following Sarah’s blog. She is a meat-eater as you may have gathered, and your lame moralising is not converting anybody to your pathetic lifestyle. It’s just pissing people off. Go away!

    Kate Reply:

    Tamantha and Debbie,

    Do yourselves a favour and read “The Vegetarian Myth” by Lierre Kieth. She was a vegan for 20yrs. I’m sorry to tell you, but if you are eating a typical vegan/vegetarian diet of grains, legumes and soy, then you are in fact supporting the destruction of the planet and the wiping out of entire species. The production of these nutrient-poor foods requires vast amounts of land (read – wiping out of natural habitats) and destroys topsoil which is necessary for our fragile ecosystem to survive.
    I’m guessing you have only been vegan/vegetarian for a short time, which is why you feel so good – it’s kind of like a detox. Give it a little while longer and you will begin to experience a steady decline in energy and health as your body struggles to sequester the nutrients it requires to function.
    As everyone else here has noted, those who adopt the paleo lifestyle are generally against factory farming – we agree with you that it is disgusting and inhumane. Pasture-raised animals, however, are generally treated well. We are not greedy and selfish – we understand and appreciate where our food comes from and realise that we are all part of the circle of life. Perhaps it’s time for you to realise where your food comes from.

    Sophia Reply:

    I applaud you for going to such lengths to eat mindfully, and I’m happy that you’ve found health and balance through your mindful consumption. But there is more than one way to eat mindfully, and different paths work for different people. I don’t appreciate your divisive, hateful comments, and I wish you’d realize that we’re all just looking to be healthy while being mindful of the planet and all our fellow beings. Saying that your way is the only way and insulting anyone who doesn’t do things exactly like you is not helpful. Please be more respectful.

    Ms Jane Reply:

    Tamantha I eat a paleo diet while my husband is vegetarian. He’s just had his cholesterol tested and it was alarmingly high.

    Sara Reply:

    Couldn’t agree more, Sandra! Just a fad, I say.

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    Michael Reply:

    Listen to the whining from the carnivores. You don’t get it do you, it’s not about diet per se it’s about the right of animals to live without cruelty. WHY DO YOU SELFISH MEAT EATERS ALWAYS THINK IT’S ALL ABOUT YOU!!! WHO DIED AND MADE YOU IN CHARGE OF THE PLANET. Michael.

    Lara Reply:

    I am an ex-vegan, and I say in all honesty that I nearly killed myself (and went mad in the process) eating that way for many years. I care deeply about animal welfare, sustainability and health. I believe in ‘do no harm,’ but I apply this first to myself, because without my health I am no good to anyone. It is hard to admit when you are wrong, but when I was vegetarian, then vegan, I was wrong – for all the right reasons. The sentiment is not wrong, it just needs to be focused in a logical direction. A grain based diet is not sustainable. Those who are interested might want to check this video out:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNON5iNf07o

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    Jodie Reply:

    I agree Grahame, it’s an individual thing, one size does not fit all!!
    http://www.modernpaleo.com.au – Jodie

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  • Christine

    Sarah, with the no grain policy, where do legumes sit? I eat mostly grain free but have mung bean starch noodles with a curry sometimes (the glass noodle type ones). And regularly have quinoa and buckwheat kernels as a porridge. I certainkply don’t get the same digestive problems with these as with pasta or bread.
    Thanks

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    Renae Reply:

    Christine, I have the same questions! Hardly eat rice/pasta/bread but do have quinoa quite often and also legumes/beans! I have IBS and notice without the bread/pasta/rice and also minimal sugar, I am less bloated but don’t know if I could give up the Quinoa, I just love it too much!

    If someone could please answer this quesiton for us, would be very much appreciated :)

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    one of the (several) issues with grains is the toxins in the husks. The same applies to legumes, so yes, they’re cut out of the paleo diet for sensible reasons – they contain poison!
    But make the choice for yourself, of course. I know some paleo types who do strict paleo 6 days, then allow a day to eat some of the less ideal stuff…

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    Eugene Reply:

    If grains are inherently toxic then how is it that human civilisation has thrived on them for thousands of years?

    But if some people’s bodies develop harmful reactions to them, then of course those people shouldn’t eat grains, and it’s great that publicity may encourage more to experiment and find out if they’re affected. However, the cause of these harmful reactions can’t just be the grain, there have to be other causes too, otherwise all humans who eat grain would get diseases. Haven’t many of the diseases that are being linked to grain become more prevalent only in the past ~hundred years?

    Sandra Reply:

    I have heard the theory behind soaking grains gets rid of the toxins. What do you think about this?

    Lara Reply:

    Eugene, the health of civilisation has NOT thrived on grains for thousands of years. Prior to agriculture we were taller, had bigger brains, straight teeth, no cavities, and there was no such thing as diabetes. Look at the incidence of cancer, depression, diabetes, heart disease and many other diseases in our modern existence. Nature did not design us to be sick and miserable, we did this to ourselves. The relationship between agriculture (grain based eating) and disease is well documented in scientific research. I highly recommend you read the book ‘Primal Body Primal Mind,’ by Nora Gedaudas if you would like to know more.

    Paula Reply:

    Quinoa is a good, nutritious food and you love it – no need to give it up!

    I think one should only eliminate foods from their diet if they make you feel unwell or are damaging rather than nurturing to your body.

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    Eugene Reply:

    Lara, the reason I’m rather sceptical about this kind of research is because there are many potentially confounding variables. This is because eating grain is just one difference between paleolithic and modern lifestyles; there are many others. For example, it could be that most people with modern metabolic problems have them not because of grains but because food generally is easily available. They could well be eating a lot more and going hungry a lot less than what their genes are adapted to.

    Thanks for the book reference, I see it’s got a kindle edition, will add it to the todo list ;)

  • DP

    LOVE IT

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  • Gina

    We have been on the low fat/no fat diet for 30 years and we are fatter than we’ve ever been and have more illnesses that we have ever had!

    It is next to impossible to buy full cream yoghurt in my local supermarket!

    Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. And exercise. It’s a philosophy, not a diet.

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Amen.

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    deesal Reply:

    Ditto!

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    Kat Reply:

    Agreed!

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  • http://www.pilatesevolutionnow.com Peta Serras

    Ohh I like this. I have been considering going Paleo myself!

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  • Patricia

    Sarah, ineresting post. You mentioned you have been eating Paleo for a 3 month trial. Yet..recent posts, you have commented how you have been feelling unwell, tired, with a flare-up of some health issues which you have. Do you feel there could possibly be a connection with that and the new diet regime?

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I tried the diet because my health had plummeted. There is a lot of documentation out there suggesting grains are really problematic for thyroid sufferers…
    The diet is definitely helping…but it’s sloooooow for me.

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    Susan Reply:

    Just out of interest, what about dairy Sarah? Have you stopped eating dairy in your Paleo diet. I have been on the Paleo grain free lifestyle for 3 months now but have continued with organic yoghurt and raw milk.

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  • http://www.silkplayground.com Lara

    Such a great post, Sarah. I’ve been on the same path since July and can’t see myself turning back. I feel energetic and have been steadily losing weight without cutting calories and going hungry. Everyone should know about this! It should be common knowledge. I’ve just finished Gary Taubes’ book ‘The Diet Delusion’ where he identifies the points in time when flawed conventional wisdom took hold. I think about how much better the health of the general population would be if everyone knew how to eat like this.

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  • Clate

    I agree with the post regarding the China Study. This changed my life and has a completely different philosophy to the Paleo diet. The Paleo diet is also impossible for vegetarians and vegans.

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    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Not true.

    Firstly, the China Study is nonsense, as anyone who has studied the raw data will attest. There aren’t links in the places Dr Campbell says there are, also, he left a LOT of information out of the studies entirely. Flawed and untrustworthy at best. Deliberately misleading fiction at worst.

    Also, many Paleos are vegetarians so you certainly can’t have looked into it very far! Im not sure on veganism but others may know more..? If you want more information the author of The Primal Blueprint, Mark Sisson, is married to a “semi-veg” (her words) and father of a vegetarian and has made many interesting posts on how to relate the diet to their needs. There is certainly a lot of information out there that I have come across, and Ive never actually looked for it!

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Clate, the China Study has attracted a lot of peer criticism. And Mia is right re vegetarians. BTW..the version of the paleo I prefer to follow is not a STACK of protein. Small amounts, not whopping great steaks.

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    Vegan Reply:

    I think Clate is right in terms of vegetarianism being tricky on a Paleo diet. As a teacher I am not allowed to consume nuts or eggs in my place of work as the anaphylaxis that many children suffer from is so severe that my place of work (and most schools) is now nut-free zones.

    If anyone knows if it is possible to become Paleo without the inclusion of nuts, eggs or meat (before you lecture me, it is a choice I have the right to make due to my own comfort levels) I would love to know as I also cannot tolerate many grains and have been finding legumes to be an essential part of my diet.

    Leah Reply:

    Paleo for Vegetarians.

    I have actually being considering exactly this. Given we live in a country where the first peoples had a diet rich in plants why has no-one explored this.

    I am sorry to say it beloved meat eaters, but as much as you feel the need to eat meat I don’t. I wont contribute to the negativity shared in here, we are all sisters in brothers and we need to make this world work.

    But apart from eating raw which I am not up to (yet), I would be interested to know if there is an indigenous food supplier and/or a naturopath or elder who specialises in indigenous food?

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  • Kate

    Sarah, in your ebook you said you lost 2kgs from quitting sugar. Now you say you have lost 2kgs going Paleo. So in total have you lost 4kgs or 2kg combined?

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I have this year.

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  • darrin

    In February last year I was frustrated that I had not lost my 5kg winter coat, and then cut fruit after reading your blog and lost the 5kg in the next 5 weeks. I’ve also kept off the 5kg this winter . . .

    And for context, I am a 43 year old male currently weighing in about 80kg at 182cm tall.

    Always looking for further methods of living healthier, and reading every word of your blog, I also purchased and read ‘I Quit Sugar’ the day it came out.

    I have been attempting to quit sugar since you first mentioned the concept. I say attempt, as I find I can not perform my exercises classes due to no energy. Sure, I have enough energy to get through the normal actives during the day, but by the end of the day, a 1 hour exercise class is not met with the normal level of energy . . .

    I did read on your blog that you reduced the intensity of your exercise. Personally I am not ready to make that decision, and still wish to perform two to three one hour cardio classes a week, with an 80km bike ride at least twice a month.

    Now reading about the Paleo diet, or in general low carb diets, this idea of being a fat burner, rather than a sugar burner, is presenting itself to be discussed further . . .

    We all may have the same DNA as the caveman, but my own body has a lifetime of sugar consumption, and I believe it’s been wired to respond to the smallest dose of sugar, whether it be a single all natural snake, or even a glass of sports drink . . .

    For me recovery from exercise without carbs takes much longer, if at all. We’re all different, or I say unique, especially in my case of sensitivity to caffeine or any form of stimulate for that matter . . .

    Therefore, it would be great to read more about how different diet choices effect energy levels and performance, for both the amateur and even the professional athlete . . .

    [Reply]

    Darren Reply:

    Darrin, have you experimented with sweet potatoes/yams after your longer endurance sessions? Say, as an example, a 300g serving of sweet potato directly after your long bike ride and also on one other day per week? May help.

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    Kate Reply:

    Hey Darrin,

    You may be interested in reading “The Paleo Diet for Athletes” by Loren Cordain. Might give you a few ideas of things to try.

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  • http://www.modernpaleo.com.au Jodie

    I have been eating Paleo since Feb 2011 but I was still low fat and low carb until I read Nora’s book Primal body, Primal mind and listened to all her podcasts and went to her seminar in November. I started to eat fat about 2 and half months ago and it has made the world of difference. I have lost 6 kilos (not the aim, but a bonus), all my aches and pains have gone, cognitively more alert, high energy, no mid afternoon slumps, no hunger or cravings. I was an exercise freak, now I just throw my kettle bells around and walk. Thanks Sarah for getting this out into mainstream I think it is a really important message. I have kept a food blog which tracks my Paleo journey – http://www.modernpaleo.com.au. When I started out there was not a lot of local knowledge about this movement. I have followed it and gained a lot of support through the internet. I really believe in sharing this message so I can make someone else’s journey a little easier.
    Jodie

    [Reply]

  • Julie

    Can you please write about QUICK breakfast ideas for Paleo eaters. This has really been killing me, as eating steak first thing in the AM or eggs every.single.day is just not sustainable! Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Jodie Reply:

    Hi Julie, I have lots of great breakfast ideas, paleo bread, biscuits etc on my blog,
    http://www.modernpaleo.com.au. Jodie

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Jodie thanks for sharing your info. Love it!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Hey Julie…I have. http://www.sarahwilson.com.au/2011/08/grain-free-sugar-free-breakfast/

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Hi Julie,

    Berries, coconut milk, coconut flakes, cinnamon powder and chopped nuts in a bowl = yum and filling!

    [Reply]

    Sophia Reply:

    In regards to eating eggs every single day, if you really wanted to do that (or at least eat them fairly often) but can’t due to time constraints, poached eggs can be premade then stored in cold water in the fridge for a few days…Just a thought, to potentially increase your morning protein fun!

    [Reply]

    Christine Reply:

    Brekky pancake: 1 egg, 3 tbsp almond meal- mix and fry in ghee. Serve with sweated mush’s, tomatoes and spinach.

    [Reply]

    shell Reply:

    How about coconut milk custard? the banana version is great with cinnamon and nutmeg. Make up one can’s worth and it should do four serves. Put into small containers and freeze if you like – delicious!

    [Reply]

  • Amy S

    I have a strong intuitive feeling that this way of eating could be key in helping me finally begin to heal from my devastating AI disease. The problem is, every time I drop my daily rice and oats I get extremely constipated because I am on 24/7 opiates for pain relief. This is taking strong laxatives twice a day, every day. I’m lucky to have two BMs a week as it is. Is there a solution, does the body adjust, or is it something I’m just not going to be able to do? Stopping the opiates is not an option as my bladder is full of bleeding ulcers and has been for 14 months. More painful than you could imagine in your worst nightmare.

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    Amy,
    Increase your intake of green leafy vegetables and this should take care of your issues.

    [Reply]

    Amy S Reply:

    Thanks for the tip, but I already eat a ton of leafy greens in daily green smoothies & salads. I still have my problem. The power of Morphine/OxyContin ;-(

    [Reply]

    Casey Reply:

    Amy, have you tried chia gel?

    Kate Reply:

    Hi Amy,

    Increasing your fat intake should help with bowel movements. Eating a lot of coconut products will also help (quite high in fibre). Perhaps taking a high-strength fish oil liquid every day will also help reduce your inflammation. Good luck!!

    [Reply]

    Amy S Reply:

    I’ve been taking this incredible supplement for 2.5 months called OMA PREM, a Hollywood dr sent it to me for free after I emailed him. It contains 30 essential fatty acids, where most fish oils contain about 3. I’m pretty sure there is nothing else like it in Ausralia. It is the Lipid extract from the Green Lipped Mussel. Other supplements like this contain crushed powder of the mussel, so they are not the same thing. Unfortunately I am about to run out and no dosh to re-order! I haven’t noticed a diff with my bladder pain but I have with my skin, joint pain and bowel issues.

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Hi Amy,

    I just had a look at the supplement you are taking – all of the fats they list you can either get from diet or the normal fish oil supplements. A lot of them are derivatives of others. Palmitic acid, palmitolitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid can all be synthesised in the body. Linoleic acid, EPA, DHA and arachidonic acid cannot, but these are all obtainable from your average fish oil. Others, such as lauric acid (found in coconuts) and butyric (found in butter) can be obtained from a well-balanced diet. So, if you can afford a good-quality high strength fish oil, I’d go with that and double the dosage. Something is better than nothing right?
    In terms of your bladder pain, try drinking alkaline water. I know it sounds trivial, but I used to get a lot of UTI’s, which I’m sure are nothing in comparison to what you have, but since drinking this water I haven’t had any! Worth a shot? Minimising stress also helps. I really hope this info helps.

    Amy S Reply:

    Thanks for that info re: fatty acids Kate! Good to know I won’t be missing out :-). I’d never be able to pay $70 for a supplement!
    I’ve actually been alkalising and ionising my water since February. It hasn’t made a difference, like everything else I’ve tried. I think it would be difficult to find something I haven’t tried! I will continue to alkalise until my drops and supplements run out, then it will be back to plain filtered stuff.

    [Reply]

    Amy S Reply:

    Thanks so much for your input guys! I have chia gel at breakfast time most days and I consume an insane amount of coconut products, milk, cream, oil, flakes, fresh baby… I feel trapped in this vicious cycle because I can’t stop the opiates because of pain, but I can’t eat the way I like and reduce pain because of the opiates – aargh! I have tried every western treatment available for my disease and all have failed. I have also tried every alternative treatment under the sun, every supplement, every herb. Completely drained my savings and am left struggling to raise my daughter on a disability pension. I think I need a real miracle to save me. A Christmas miracle, please god?

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Kate, thanks for all your advice on this post. Amy, leave the issue with me.

    [Reply]

    Shell Reply:

    Check this with your naturopath, but I understand that constipation on a grain-free diet can be due to reduced/deficient beneficial gut flora – so a good probiotic and some fermented foods might be an option, particularly when you are taking strong medications. Get some advice though – as I’m not sure of any negative reactions between your ulcer medication and probiotics/fermented food.

    [Reply]

  • Mel

    My family have been paleo (more Primal actually) for 8 months. We have never felt better.
    We don’t miss the pasta and bread and we all look very fit now. I have dropped from 72kgs to 58kg. Most of that in the first 4 months.
    Delicious food, lots of butter and cream. It’s lovely.

    [Reply]

    Debbie Reply:

    have a look into how the dairy industry treats its cows…not good…do you really care so little about animals that you could condone that?

    [Reply]

    L Reply:

    Getting dairy from a local farm where animals are treated like kings is always the way to go.

    [Reply]

  • Jo

    Thanks Jodie, it’s the first question that I think of when considering the paleo diet. What for breakfast!

    [Reply]

  • Jo

    I’ve been doing the no-grain thing (well, I still eat sushi w/ rice sometimes but I can’t see me giving that up) for the last few weeks after being sugar-free since March. I feel better off the wheat and am noticing some extra weight loss above what I got with just no-sugar. I never previously thought anything of eating wheat for every meal. It was just what you did! And I used to think butter and saturated fats were evil. Now I love my butter! My friends are commenting on how I’ve never looked better and thinking of giving this ‘diet’ (way of life for me now I think) a go.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.thirdontheright.blogspot.com le

    my darling man switched to this diet after a particularly nasty run in with giardia … he lost 10kgs with the sickness and in internet searches found the bug mainly lived on .. you guessed it carbs.

    we were already gf and refined sugar free so the switch was not too difficult at all .. I lost 5kgs in three weeks and will keep on keeping on – you go girl :) like Graeme we have had better health for all of us – boys aged 7 and 9 – no colds all winter – ya le xox

    [Reply]

    lou Reply:

    Hi there, can you tell me what your daily diet consists of

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  • Debbie

    All very well and good to worry about your own body…but has any one stopped and thought about the bodies of innocent animals that are used, abused and killed for consumption??? I’m sorry…but I will not be a selfish meat eater…I am a vegan and have lost weight…am healthier than ever with the highest iron count I have ever had and lowest cholesterol read (at last blood donation). Must better than when I swallowed flesh and secretions of animals. Vegans live healthier and happier lives. My love life has improved also…a nice side effect!!

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    the lower cholesterol consumption the better the blood flow!! ;) everyone knows what blood keeps up and hard lol

    [Reply]

    stoneagemom Reply:

    High iron count isn’t necessarily good. Read up on iron toxicity.

    Many animals are killed in the production of grain.

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    what do the animals eat??? If a vegan say eats a couple of cups of grain a day then i wonder how much grain all your ‘meat’ eats, also the water all the animals consume, this is not a never ending source… essentially vegans are hurting earth life a lot less than meat eaters. Read Scientific American and see what eating meat is doing to the environment. Also I believe Debbie is referring to her Hemoglobins (the iron in her red blood cells) if this is not high than you will suffer from anemia which is a common stereotype of a vegan… “you’re vegan, you will get sick and weak” When your hemoglobins are high you can give blood more frequently and essentially save more lives :D

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    You are correct that low iron can cause anemia but high iron can also cause calcification of your organs. Like anything else out there, too much of a good thing is just too much. There is also a disorder called Hemachromatosis in which the body does not expel iron and can become quite dangerous. Advocating getting all the iron you can is just plain wrong.

    jan Reply:

    Because B12 from which iron is made is not readily bio-available from a vegan diet – I would be guessing that Debbie is taking a supplement or getting it from fortified vegan foods which is kind of cheating. Also B12 can be stored in your body for many years so a deficiency is not going to show up for a very long time.

    Sandra Reply:

    High iron count can kill do you more harm than good Debbie, do your research. Ultimately, there is a food chain and man is at the top.
    You are not better than anyone else here commenting simply because you are a vegan/vegetarian.
    Stop being such a mean, ugly person you keep claiming to full of compassion.

    [Reply]

    Sharyn Reply:

    Here, here!!

    [Reply]

    deesal Reply:

    You don’t SOUND very happy! As Sarah says, don’t preach about but “simply, be your message”.

    [Reply]

    seeker Reply:

    Debbie, have you ever watched any of those wildlife programmes, where animals KILL EACH OTHER for food in very violent ways?? I know they don’t have blogs, but have you ever considered telling them how to behave/eat?

    [Reply]

    Sophia Reply:

    Imagine those lovely peaceful fields where the soybeans for your tofu and soymilk are grown. Imagine all the cute little bunnies and birds that used to make their home in the trees that were killed to make way for that lovely field. Now imagine all the water that is poured onto that field to keep it the soybeans so nice and fat, and the pesticides that are sprayed on to kill the cute bugs and animals that venture near or drink the runoff from the field. And speaking of runoff, imagine all the topsoil that is washed away in that poisoned wasteful runoff each growing season.

    Now imagine my friend Babe. Babe is a cow who lives on a naturally occurring field next door to me, which is also the home of many wild birds and bunnies. She is a lovely animal who roams around her grassland at will and eats good locally produced organic alfalfa hay. She provides the milk I drink every day and the organic fertilizer for my neighbor’s garden. She coexists with chickens who enjoy a life of pecking throughout the field to their heart’s content while providing eggs and occasionally meat for me and my neighbors to eat with the milk from Babe and the vegetables fertilized by her manure.

    So, who is more ethical in their eating…The soymilk/tofu eating vegan, or the milk/eggs/chicken/veggies eating carnivore?

    [Reply]

  • Rebecca

    I find it really interesting to read about this diet choice especially as it is gaining so much popularity here in Norway (stores are selling out of butter for example). I personally do not see it as a diet choice that is beneficial. It may work for others, but I’m not sure on the benefits. There are far better ways to lose weight and have a healthier lifestyle that doesn’t involve the killing and suffering of so many species. I really hope that this diet does not continue to spread because the conditions we already force upon other living, breathing, feeling animals is disgraceful without further pressure. This choice of diet doesn’t only effect the individual but countless animals. I am aware that I come across sounding like a hippy and I myself have only recently come to this realisation. It opened my eyes. I only hope I can impart wisdom and have the same effect on others. X

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    really well said Rebecca. Just because you care for animals and the environment does not mean you are ‘hippy’ we only have one Earth and life would be impossible without it. So doesn’t it only make sense to care for it

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Again – both of you should read “The Vegetarian Myth” – written by a vegan!

    [Reply]

    Rebecca Reply:

    Thank you for the recommendation. I am always looking to learn more. X

    [Reply]

    Peter Bowler Reply:

    Part of what I am picking up through much comment on Sarah’s trial of the Paleo diet is how meat eaters have chosen to put so much at risk in pursuit of their choice.

    I have no fear for the planet, none at all. My reason mainly goes to an understanding I have that the planet is essentially an organism and in similar fashion to that expressed by Mr Smith in The Matrix we, people/humans that is, have exhibited not much more consideration that your average virus….we move, we multiply, we consume, we move because it is consumed, we multiply etc and so on.

    There will come a day and the planet will close down. I have not seen anything within the mass nature of man, the species, to conclude otherwise.
    In a far off time she will awaken in a new form because I doubt she will see sense in returning to old ways of being…much to evolved for that.

    Ok; I get the non-meat eaters regard meat eaters as the antithesis to all things nice. Sorry for that I made the mistake I have noticed others making – let me rectify…some non-meat eaters have really negative comments to make about other peoples dietary choices. They have not met them, know nothing of their care or love of others and/or nature, nothing of their politics and what they do to care for their local community.
    Ok; I get that meat eaters take exception to this and send back their own volley of vitriol.

    If we were able to take a collective breath and work out the sort of diet we might be able to pursue if we did not impact on anything, not any other living thing no matter how big or small then I think we have to agree we have to make some impact.
    Now we get down to how much impact…

    My family recently lost a lovely friend of age 92; wonderful wonderful lady, friend and grandmother. I had a realisation some time not too long after her passing that I am as a grain of sand on the beach and of no more moment than that. I have since been practicing to adapt my responses accordingly.

    To my brothers and sisters – the measure of negative expression in your comment must come back to live in your life…I believe there is no other way for it.
    Breathe, if you believe someone has made a ‘wrong’ choice please ask yourself who deigned your choice as ‘right’ before you begin to throw stones at their choice which is similar to the one you would protect because it’s personal. Is it the making them wrong that makes yours right?

    I begun to practicing living in a way that’s right in the world without making the other wrong. I doubt it will catch on in any grand fashion but as I said a grain of sand and no great moment.

    Peace

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Hi Peter
    So sorry for your loss. I was watching an Australian comedian last night Adam Hills and in his joke routine he said that a measure of a good life is if you are an uplifter (you make people feel better) and a measure of a great life, is if you are still an uplifter after death. He had been attending a celebration wake for a young friend who had passed away and was still wearing the bunny ears that she so loved on his early morning walk home and he forgot about them and didn’t realise why people were smiling at him. So he said she was still an uplifter after death through the bunny ears which is a lovely way of looking at her life.

    The one thing that I would like the vegetarians to take away from this discussion is to understand that some of us just can’t do a vegetarian diet. When I was studying nutrition, I heard it countless times that people had tried to go vegetarian and just got tireder and sicker, including one of my lecturers who went vegetarian for 2 years. And that was my experience as well. It is just not a diet that suits everybody although I love vegetarian food and eat it frequently as a way to cut down on my total meat consumption. :)

    [Reply]

  • Michael

    Sarah did you actually do any research on the subject of pre-horticultural societies before submitting your erroneous diatribe. If you had bothered to do so you may have discovered that the consumption of nuts and grains were indeed part of their diet. Further, you would have discovered that as domestication of animals had not been attained, dairy products were not consumed, in fact the only lactose product consumed was breast milk.

    The result of columnists not properly researching the subject of their articles is a misinformed readership. Due to the reach of the mass media these opinions are therefore circulated widely. With many readers unable or unwilling to utilise critical thinking skills, these opinion pieces are given false credibility and treated as factual. I am not calling to account your freedom to express yourself, only requesting that articles that pertain to be factual be based on credible research. Michael Bradley.

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    well said!!

    [Reply]

    deesal Reply:

    Often wondered what purpose dairy cows had before man started milking them?

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    Mooing… chewing grass… licking their young… I am sure to them our life seems pointless too lol

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Actually, in the circle of life there are very few apex predators. Nature is designed that nearly everything is eaten, and everything eats something that is once alive.

    If we did not eat cows and released them back into the world to roam free, they would be preyed upon by something else in nature. Its simply the way the food chain works and it is the balance that is so beautiful in nature. Ever seen a lion take down a water buffalo? Dont you think they would perhaps prefer a cushy life of chewing grass and being killed humanely at the end of it than being torn apart limb from limb then feasted on while still alive? If you look at it that way, we are doing the cows a favor.

    It’s something to think of it. We are a part of this world, and we serve a function in the food chain – we are animals too.

    Alex Reply:

    Tamantha, They actually don’t ever contemplate our life. They don’t even contemplate their life. That is why we can feel happy to eat them. As living things they are conditioned by their genetic ancestry to run for the hills if they smell a predator, but sitting around, chewing grass and wondering if the grass is greener on the other side, or what those pesky humans are up to is outside of their reality. They sit in a fenced paddock and don’t realise they are captives. They don’t feel their exploitation the way you do for them. They would be just as happy on either side of the fence. They may die when we decide to eat them, but at least we won’t eat them alive, which is what would happen to them on the other side of the fence. We are all living things and as such we do what we do. In some cases we eat food, and in other cases, we are food. Sorry, but that’s how the universe is. And it is indifferent to your sensitivities. Don’t eat meat. It your decision. But eating meat is not cruel. That is just in your mind.

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Michael, I think it’s a bit rash to accuse me of not doing my research. There are many takes on the paleo diet, few of which aim to eat EXACTLY like a cave man. That would be stupid and serve no purpose. The principles are taken on board and adapted. Ergo, dairy. On the nuts front, our systems are very much compromised from generational dietary abuse – you read about Pottinger’s cats?? And so our ability to digest nuts etc is compromised. I personally eat some nuts – activated. My system is VERY compromised so I have to be a little careful. I haven’t followed what I’ve learned blindly.

    [Reply]

  • Emma

    Hi,
    Thanks Sarah for an always inspiring blog – the one i look most forwards to reading each day! I hope you know that you are doing something important with everything you are sharing in your posts here,very much appreciated by me and evidently lots of other readers.
    Just adding another point of view after reading through the comments; I think it’s good to remember that everyone is different and apart from the obvious (don’t eat non-foods, artificially made for profit and nothing to do with nutrition or well being or very modified foods) one type of diet won’t fit every single person.
    I do believe in eating real food – and that sugar, flavour enhancers, GM foods and e numbers etc are surely to blame for masses if health issues/diseases today, but when it comes to such a meat focused way of eating I’m not sure it’s a solution for everyone.
    Some body types will thrive on a balanced vegetarian diet, some on grain free etc.
    Personally I needed to cut out dairy all together to reach better health and can’t eat too much red meat.
    The Ayurvedic way of looking at broad types but still acknowledging that each person within those groups will still need to find their optimum diet by listening to their bodies I think is quite wise.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.pasturefedmeat.com.au Maria Armistead

    Hi Sarah
    I read your article with interest. We are beef, lamb and pork producers of pasture fed meat in Gippsland and a group of our customers who buy our meat regularly introduced us to the whole Paleo idea. I must say that seeing this particular group become fit, healthy and so full of vitality month by month has really made me take note. I am convinced there is something to it. Having access to meat so easily, we find that we tend to eat meat daily and as much as we want. Maybe thats why we have the energy to keep working as hard as we do on our farm during the week and then go selling at farmers markets at weekends even though we are in our early sixties. If more people keep talking about the benefits of grass (pasture) fed meat the healthier our comunity will beoome. Keep up the good work. Maria

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    Not suss at all!!… advertising for something you will make profit in

    [Reply]

    Michael Reply:

    I agree Tamantha, this is precisely why her argument is invalid, she has a vested interest in the continuation of the production and consumption of meat products. Michael.

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    Well it seems that there are some people contributing to this particular discussion who have a certain moral/political world view that is unmovable and will always see the consumption of meat as an evil that should be eliminated. Why they are even reading Sarah Wilson’s blog is quite beyond me. Michael, you have found a soul-mate in Tamantha, the person who won’t eat anything that once had a face, and you both seem to feel very strongly about the slaughter of animals, or the environmental sustainability of meat farming, or the treatment of chickens etc etc… and that is your right. But I find your comment here to be quite narrow minded and a little offensive. You have dismissed her comments because she is a meat farmer? You obviously have no idea how hard grain producers have lobbied health departments over the years to get their (flawed) low-fat message across. Should we dismiss their argument because of vested interest? I say yes. Should we dismiss your argument because of your obviously biased moral/political world view. I say yes as well.

    Michael Reply:

    An interesting submission. Unfortunately due to the vested interest involved it is hardly impartial. Your claim that you attribute your energy and heath to an abundant supply of meat that is consumed daily is at odds with the dietary information that has been promulgated by nutritionists and other health and medical experts for some time now. While you claim that grass fed is a better choice for the health of consumers than grain, the end result for the animal is unchanged. They are still subject to the stress of loading, cartage, unloading and finally SLAUGHTER. While the finished product is marketed and presented for sale in a manner that bears little resemblance to its former self, this PRODUCT as it is now known was killed and butchered in order that you may indulge in an unsustainable lifestyle. It doesn’t matter how you dress it up, the meat industry from farm to retail, including the consumer, are complicit in the murder of sentient beings. Think about that as you plunge the knife into your steak. Michael.

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    Yes slaughter. That is how it is. Some animals eat meat. WE are one of them. That’s life. Get over it. Don’t like it? Top yourself.

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    Before there was a meat industry, before there were “consumers” in the modern sense, before there was a dollar to be made, people ate meat. People will probably always eat meat, its what people do. Would you say that a lion is complicit in the murder of a gazelle?

    [Reply]

    deesal Reply:

    Shame on that lion for harming that poor gazelle…!

    Tamantha Reply:

    are you implying our digestive system is similar to that of a lion? or our teeth for that matter? Carnivorous animals have much shorter intestines so they can excrete their meat faster, they have an elongated snout with razor sharp teeth so they can rip flesh from a creatures body to eat it fresh. they also have a bacterial fighting component in their saliva and stomaches making it very difficult for them to suffer from diseases found in meat. they also have the speed necessary to catch their prey. Humans do NOT NEED meat for a healthy life… it is a WANT factor…

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Our digestive system is more similar to that of other primates… who are also omnivores. Humans clearly aren’t carnivores but we certainly do not have the enzymes and multiple stomachs of herbivores like cows and pandas.

    Alex Reply:

    Tamantha, I feel that i need to reply to your point about the anatomy of humans vs carnivorous predators. We don’t share talons, claws and fangs with other meat eaters because we cook our meat. This may seem a strange comment but most people are totally unaware that cooking is something our ancestors have done since “before” we were human. In fact, it may be the single most important factor in our evolution as humans. There is archeological evidence that points to the consumption of cooked food by our pre-human ancestors, which made us the carnivorous ape, able to digest protein in large amounts, influencing muscle and (most importantly) brain growth, and eventually turning us into homo sapiens. We are the ape with the booty, that walks, and runs upright. Have you ever thought about this? Our large glutes and leg muscles are there because we are hunters. No other ape has them. We are designed to run, with great endurance, until our prey is exhausted. We have minimal hair so that our bodies may be cooled by our sweat. And we do this with two of our limbs free to throw stones, spears or any other tools we may utilise. Our ability to use technology to kill is part of our evolutionary path. We are not designed to graze. Yes there are diffrences between us and other carnivores, but our anatomy is closer to them than to grazing herbivores.

    Amy S Reply:

    I was quite surprised when I first learned of how much meat Chimpanzees (our closest genetic ancestor?) eat!

    Mike Reply:

    Michael, no one thinks any better of you, it’s not kind not to feed of other organisms, evolution needs you to do just that. Eat meat and fat to thrive as your chemistry demands. Alternatively. don’t…get sick and die, either way it’s all the same to everyone around you, no one will lose sleep which is also very important. Your choice my friend.

    [Reply]

  • Mia Bluegirl

    Interesting that so many choose to believe that a vegetarian/ vegan diet is cruelty free. Not necessarily so, depending on what you eat and where you get it from. My research into mass grain agriculture seems to inform me that I am better off eating fresh fish and locally farmed, free-range, organic meat than a loaf of bread or a bag of Doritoes, in terms of how many animals were killed and ecosystems destroyed.

    I am not saying that factory farming isnt hideous. It is. But Big Agra is no better. As humans we need to change a LOT of our practises when it comes to dealing with our Earth. Factory farming is only one of them. Just because you are not supporting one cruel, destructive practise doesnt mean you are not inadvertently supporting many others. I would be interested to see stats on how many animals are murdered in order to keep the Dorito-loving, bread-eating vegan fed in a year. I am certain it would be more than your average Paleo, and a lot more humane too.

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    maybe try eat local organic produce…. veggies and fruit and grains. then you wont actually be taking an innocent life purely for your taste buds… no point killing a life if you do not actually need it for survival right?! who is to say your life is more important than it’s own… you?

    [Reply]

    Michael Reply:

    Mia, with all due respect, you have failed to grasp the point at issue here. Vegans do not utilise ANY product that has been sourced from or tested on any species of animal. Therefore your argument that adherence to a Paleo diet having a lesser effect on the ecosystem is flawed. You fail to consider the environmental cost that is involved in a non-vegan lifestyle and the stress placed on the planet’s resources to allow you to eat meat. The claim that animals are murdered for the so-called Dorito loving bread eating vegan is contradictory, it is only those who choose to use and consume animal products that are complicit in these actions.

    While I agree with you that the modern agri-business with its intensive farming practices is a major contributor toward environmental destruction, including the disturbance and eradication of the habitat of certain species, consideration of the amount of food energy needed to maintain a non-vegan diet far exceeds that of the vegan; that is it takes more cleared land to grow the pasture and grain to produce enough meat to feed omnivores than that required for a meat free diet.

    Before making unsubstantiated claims about the vegan lifestyle it would be pertinent to learn what vegan-ism is. Considering that it is those who use and consume animals who condemn them to death, I believe all non-vegans have a duty of care to watch the documentary ‘Earthlings’. It is available online. Michael.

    [Reply]

    Eugene Reply:

    I don’t fully agree with Mia, and think that _well-sourced_ vegan food is probably less costly to animals & the ecosystem overall than most animal-based foods. I think one of her points though is that vegan food isn’t 100% cruelty free and she’s right. Consider that using current technologies, unfortunately, farmers kill a lot of insects and mice when they grow grains and soy – even though that’s not the intention of course.

    [Reply]

    stoneagemom Reply:

    How is the locally source produce fertilized?

    You can’t escape animal production and destruction in the food you eat. NO animal in nature can.

    Please read the “Vegetarian Myth” by Lierre Kieth.

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    So you watched a doco and it changed your little middle class life. Who are you people?

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Michael – I’ll watch “Earthlings” if you read “The Vegetarian Myth” by Lierre Kieth

    [Reply]

    Debbie Reply:

    Mia,

    I am very confused by your words…now let me get this straight…you are involved in the meat industry…sooo….i guess you would have a slightly vested interest in promoting meat?? You are right in one way, i guess…no human be they vegan, or meat eater is innocent of harming the planet in some way, however your are very wrong if you think that meat eaters impact is less than a vegans impact. Do a bit of research before you comment. Watch ‘Earthlings’ or just investigate for yourself. While I understand the idea of grain fed ‘free’ range animals would soothe some people concience’s…sadly this is just a poor attempt to make doing something very wrong …seem ok. Animals are not put on earth for us to exploit…use…rape….abuse….test upon…cut…bleed….devour…hurt…harm…or kill. Animals have feelings…they feel fear, pain and confusion. They are born to live…breed…and not born to feed or serve us. I am a very healthy vegan…I do everything that I can to avoid hurting the planet. I do not eat meat or drink milk meant for another animal…I pick up rubbish from our beaches every afternoon…I love my children…I raise them to respect ALL life…I care for those less fortunate and I sleep without guilt. I do not take life. I use products that are not tested on animals…avoid all leather products and would never wear fur. Many years ago we enslaved other humans because they were a different colour….thankfully we have evolved from this hidious crime…we now realise that we all beed the same…well guess what….I have evolved even further…I know that animals beed too…just like us. One day soon we will look back at this time in history…when we killed innocent animals as a time of hidious practises. When will you evolve?

    [Reply]

    Debbie Reply:

    …not beed…should read…bleed. sorry

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    Can any of you please tell me when in history man did not eat animals? And all of you, to be taken seriously need to admit your completely blinded by YOUR own beliefs and can’t see through them. Just because one feels a certain way does not make them right and the other person wrong. Being a bully about it all does not give one credibility,.

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Debbie I dont work in the meat industry. :) That would be another commentor entirely, please see above. You might want to try some animal fats, they really do help brain function.

    Just FYI, there are more humans enslaved in the world today than any other period in history. But why let the facts get in the way of good propaganda, right?

    Oh, and as far as “rape” of animals go… you are one sick fuck. Please consider therapy if bestiality is what you spend your nights thinking about. Peace out.

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Wow Mia. That last paragraph was a brand-new low for you.

    Tamantha Reply:

    Cows have to be impregnated for a calf, and they need a calf to produce milk… Naturally cows would not have the high number of calves the dairy industry needs for them to have in order to have so much dairy… hence the word ‘rape’ is used in order to convey what must really happen and to try and give an understanding to people who have never considered what goes on in order to have cheese.

    Jenna Reply:

    Tamantha a cow only needs to produce one calf and continue to be milked to keep producing milk they would be more inclined to be “raped” by other cows in the wild…

    Alex Reply:

    I say bring back cannibalism. We should eat all the vegans and vegetarians. That way we get our meat and they die happy, knowing that the world’s human population is being culled, and that caged chickens are being saved.

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    Another middle class bourgeois who watched “Earthlings”. You are laughable.

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    “I say bring back cannibalism. We should eat all the vegans and vegetarians.”

    Nah, I dont eat grain-fed meat… wouldn’t be very tasty…

    Alex Reply:

    Another middle class bourgeois who watched “Earthlings”. You are laughable.

    [Reply]

    deesal Reply:

    Debbie, if you “do everything that I can to avoid hurting the planet”, then one would assume you live in a naturally formed cave rather than a structure built out of any type of Earth sourced materials such as bricks, timber, steel etc… And how can you sleep well at night as you lay in your cosy bed (is it dressed with cotton sheets and woollen blankets??) Do you lose sleep thinking about how the computer that you type these messages on was made and the resources used to actually operate it? Seriously, if you want to spread your message, stop being so self-righteous and hypocritical… get off the internet, go back to your cave and simply LIVE it!

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    Vegan means no wool love

    Deesal Reply:

    Why no wool? Is shearing the wool off a sheep considered cruel?? Seeing an unshawn sheep buckling under the weight of its wool would bring a tear to the eye of even the most devoted meat-eater! Do you feel compassion for anyone who has a haircut too??

    And by the way, I DO have an opinion on the paleo way but given that you singled me out as being a “Troll” when my comments were far less ‘offensive’ than many others on here suggests to me that perhaps my comments hit a nerve… After reading through the comments of those against it who claim to talk the talk but don’t fully walk the walk, why should I not have the same right to point out their hypocrisy as they do their condemnation of those for it? If you can’t handle a view differing to your own, then get off the net, stop creating carbon with your computer and be authentic in your convictions. Maybe then, those who you perceive to be in opposition to you will perhaps sit up and take more notice.

    Sophia Reply:

    Amen! What we eat is not the ethical problem, it’s where it came from.

    [Reply]

  • Eugene

    I’m glad that many people have benefited from the Paleo diets, but this article seems to be over-hyping them as being superior than other potentially healthy diets.

    Actually, the paleo diet isn’t the only alternative to the processed fast food that’s become so plentiful in recent times.

    Carbs/sugars aren’t all the same.. There are the low-GI starches in wholegrains (that the body slowly digests into sugars), and then there is the simple high-GI concentrated sugar in refined high-fructose corn syrup. The quantity matters too – almost any healthy diet will advise against eating a lot of sweets, but moderate amounts of low-GI sugars aren’t bad for us. Actually our bodies have evolved to metabolise starches/sugars quite efficiently – and since many of us don’t need so much energy it often gets naturally processed into fat.

    Also, I don’t quite understand the attack on grain. Many humans have been eating lots of grain for thousands of years, and yet a lot of these chronic health problems (e.g. obesity, diabetes) have only really started taking off in the past hundred years.

    And seriously, regarding the saturated fat stuff, even though some of the original articles may well have been flawed, there has surely been additional research to investigate it more accurately since then. For example, http://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/12/8/911.long. No doubt though, all this stuff is very complex and not fully understood by anyone.. Saturated fat is probably not all bad either. Maybe those who eat lots of it and are healthy do a lot of physical activity?

    Anyways, congratulations to those who take some responsibility and experiment to improve their health :) Eugene.

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    Check out Dr. Loren Cordain at http://www.thepaleodiet.com. He is considered the “father” of the paleo movement. What I like about him, is he has done all the studies and research and gives very valid points other than what the mainstream “paleo” thinkers give.
    He explains the grain thing very well and why we have not evolved fast enough to be able to handle them.

    [Reply]

    Debbie Reply:

    honestly, can you think of the animals that have their throats cut for us for one second??? Instead of you so called health??? I am a healthy vegan..we do not need to eat flesh! Who cares who says what….think of the animals that die and suffer.

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Did you think of the broccoli that had its throat cut so you could live? Why are you so selfish that you murdered that poor innocent wheat stalk so you could selfishly stuff your face with it’s decaying corpse? WONT SOMEBODY THINK OF THE VEGETABLES?!?!?

    Sandra Reply:

    Debbie,
    Once again, you are no better than anyone here. You have a difference of opinion but you keep feeling you have the right to put everyone down. Enough already, your drama is getting really old.

    Alex Reply:

    Debbie can you please just FUCK OFF!

    Alex Reply:

    I only think of the animals as food. Man, they taste good! Lamb chops..mmmm, Steak..mmmm, Pork fillet..mmmm. Roast chicken..mmmm

    jan Reply:

    Debbie, the vegetarian/vegan way of life does not suit everybody as you seem to continually point out. I have tried to eat vegetarian and it just did not suit me. I always had extremely low energy. I went to college to study nutition and after hearing this time and time again, I realised that much as I would love to be vegetarian it does not suit me and it does not suit many, many others who have tried it.

    Alex Reply:

    “Paleo” is just a buzz word. The ideas are sound and are featured in a lot of diets that have trendy names. The philosophy is simple though. Yes, many of us can manage just fine eating sugar and grains, but it really wasn’t part of our diet for the first million or so years of our evolution, and we can do just fine without them. Many of us would be healthier if we cut grain consumption and eliminate sugar consumption.

    And can all the politically inclined vegans just FUCK OFF!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Debate is great. Cruelty isn’t. Please back off a little?

    [Reply]

    Tamantha Reply:

    I do agree. debate is healthy and necessary in order to learn.. though many people are having a good time using colourful language. This does not make me think they are educated and worth listening to… I am sorry your article has caused so much anger. Do not take it personally, people will be foul mouthed regarding any subject. Alex and Deesal are clearly trolls. (people who dont necessarily have an opinion, they just like to upset people) Veganism to me is a very obvious and simple choice. Are my tastebuds more precious than a creatures life? My decision to become Vegan was not for health, this was just a nice side effect. I love animals so how can i eat them

    Alex Reply:

    Sure, probably went a little too hard. But really, this is an interesting blog that has some pretty cool ideas, and I’m a little irritated by the moralising. Don’t like meat? Fine, don’t eat it, but don’t accuse me and the rest of the world of being cruel etc etc. And don’t do it here. I’m a troll because I’m tired of the preaching? Please! And to accuse a person of not being educated because they used profanity? And of not having an opinion. Try harder please. You must not do a lot of reading. Some of the greatest works of literature have used profanity. It has coloured the ideas of people far more educated and intelligent than you or I. I think your veganism sucks, but it is your veganism, and you’re welcome to it, but stop trying to shove it down my throat (pardon the pun).

    deesal Reply:

    LMAO!

    [Reply]

    seeker Reply:

    alex! love the canabilism comment!! & mia bluegirl’s … hahaha, funneeeeeee! these vegans and vegos are not good role models for their cause. it’s so hard not to take the piss – ooops is that colourful language? (yellow perhaps?)

    i kinda feel sorry for them, because i accept their point of view and i do try to respect it, but it’s challenging when they are so judgemental and aggressive in their comments. i feel sorry for them because they don’t seem to have any respect for the other views that are posted, it makes me think they haven’t really evolved as humans (perhaps lack of meat to blame here?!) … aah well … maybe in the next lifetime …

    to feel sorry for them, i feel is compassionate, to post this thought is maybe a bit judgemental …. but hopefully not in a harsh way …

    i think there is a lot to think about from all sides of the argument, but i wish we humans could just try being more open to all sides, instead of shooting each other down, but i guess that’s our animal nature?!

    it all becomes too hard, can’t help wishing the self righteous would just find another blog, but i guess it’s giving us all plenty to think about & opposing views are always good for perspective …

    when reason, intelligence & good manners fail though, it’s hard not to resort to humour!!

    ““I say bring back cannibalism. We should eat all the vegans and vegetarians.”
    Nah, I dont eat grain-fed meat… wouldn’t be very tasty…”

    haaaaaaaaaaaaahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah!

    Marielize Reply:

    Hi Eugene, replying on this part of your statement
    ” I don’t quite understand the attack on grain. Many humans have been eating lots of grain for thousands of years, and yet a lot of these chronic health problems (e.g. obesity, diabetes) have only really started taking off in the past hundred years.”

    If you are really interested on why we (paleo supporters) shun grains dr Davis’s book wheat belly explains the issues very well. In a nut shell, we are not eating the same produce any longer after the green revolution, the gluten is a far more toxic strain.

    Also there is no doubt that your ability to handle grains will depend on what your heritage are. The only people somewhat adapted are middle eastern people who ate grains for 10 000 years. The rest of Europeans are not at all adapted and least adapted are first nations and Scottish/Irish people.

    lovely information here from dr Rose, who has also been featured in the new Scientist
    http://55theses.org/2011/06/17/diet-what-you-need-to-know-based-on-your-heritage/

    [Reply]

    Eugene Reply:

    Hi Mariielize, thanks for your reply. I don’t have the time to read Wheat Belly, but the videos from Dr Rose sound sensible though I don’t quite understand how people can “lose an adaptation” as they get older. By green revolution, do you mean the neolithic one or the recent technological one? I’m also concerned that for-profit corporations currently have lots of control over seeds, lessen the genetic diversity of our crops and are as ever predominantly focused on short-term gains.. Can you give a quick overview of why Dr Davis argues that gluten’s become more toxic? Also, what about rice and corn?

    Yes, genetics are recognised pretty much everywhere to play a major part in gluten sensitivity, which is why I think it’s a complicated matter, not just wheat simply being toxic. Thing is, judging from the past, until the mechanisms (i.e. actual adaptations at a biochemical level) are identified and/or there are convincing randomised trials with relatively healthy subjects, mainstream medicine is not likely to accept a broad evolutionary hypothesis. There’s lots of stuff on gluten sensitivity and HLA-DQ on wikipedia so research is ongoing.. However, the HLA-DQ alleles that are implicated in adverse reactions don’t correspond neatly to ethnic groups and having the high-risk allele doesn’t always give someone overt sensitivity so there are other causes at play.

    [Reply]

  • Lou

    Hi Sarah
    Why don’t you consider trialling a vegetarian or vegan diet for three months and compare how you feel? Maybe you have before, but if you haven’t are you really able to compare? I’m afraid I don’t like the taste or feeling I have when I eat meat. I only eat whole grain products, fruit, vegetables and full fat dairy. I am also sugar free and make all my meals from scratch (meaning I don’t eat pre-packaged food). I buy whole grain bread from an organic bakery. I have lost weight eating this way and that my health has improved.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I have. It didn’t work for me. I think the fact you’re not eating processed food is key to your health improvements. And the full-fat thing is also important. You might not have done as much damage (yourself or via your genes) to your body as many of us and can work your way through the toxins in grains… Read about Pottingers’ cats on this front.

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    Pottinger’s Phrophecy – a great read!!

    [Reply]

    avis Reply:

    Have u guys considered looking into blood type dieting?
    Some of u rave about going vegan improves your health while others praise the paleo diet for doing wonders.

    We are not all alike…neither is the tyoe of blood that flows thru each of our bodies….TYPE A are suppose to be vegans and grain eaters while type O are meat eaters.

    as one poster said: ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL.

    I find it ridiculous why we bother debating about whether eating meat is morally wrong. What we should keep our focus on is eating meat “can be” part of a healthy regimen but in doing so, being conscious of how that meat is obtained is important.

    If we stopped eating meat should it mean we also stop all the carnivorous animals from eating meat also? Get them to switch to vegan.

    I think it is a personal choice and we should respect others’ choices. Meat can be bad just like gmo crops can be bad. Our instinct is to survive and thus eating what we need to to sustain our species.

    [Reply]

  • Sandra

    Great article. I would like to point out that the caveman did not get their fat from eating the meat of the animals they hunted ( wild animals are very lean in fat) but by consuming the organs of these animals.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    They got them from both. But as I say, sooooo hard to fit all the detail into a mainstream column!

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    Yes, I agree on both. What I meant is the majority of the fat they consumed was from eating the “whole” animal not just the “meat cuts” with the organs being where the fat was.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    i think i’d really steer away folk if I suggested eating kidneys and marrow…!

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    For what its worth, I’d be keen on more info re. other parts to eat? I’d love to experiment beyond the usual muscle cuts of meat but not sure where to start!

  • Amanda

    hi! i’m from sweden and i just loooove your blog, //Amanda :)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.mandagerycreek.com.au Sophie Hansen

    Hi Sarah,

    As deer farmers we are BIG fans of the Paleo diet – venison seems to fit perfectly within the Paleo philosophy. Our farm is about four hours west of Sydney and our animals graze on natural pastures according to holistic farming principles. Our meat is beautiful, tender, lean and full of protein and other goodies. Heaps of recipes on our website, http://www.mandagerycreek.com.au

    Thanks,
    Sophie

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    What? Your meat has protein in it? Wowww! That’s insane!

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    Kate,
    You are just as rude as Debbie. So much for being a caring, compassionate person.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.kisslifestyle.blogspot.com April

    Great article, love that you’ve tried it out, it’s a very interesting read and ‘food for thought’. There are just so many theories, with some really good justification; vegetarianism, blood type, Ayurveda….I used to feel so overloaded with information. Now I realise it isn’t one rule fits all. I eat as close to nature as possible (local, organic, seasonal, org and free range animal products, some org wholegrains), because i listen to my body and know what works for me. So I think we must remember to go with what suits us, the individual. If you suffer AI disease and/or are carrying extra weight then Paleo sounds like a good idea, grains were used when faced with famine after all. But maybe this isn’t for everyone!!! Looking forward to reading more xx

    [Reply]

  • Ang

    Just wondering where health bodies advice fits into all if this? Cancer Council NSW and many others, not to mention nutritionists advice. They advocate a plant based diet, whole grains are important, and meat limited to 3-4 times a week.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Be careful of health bodies…look into who is funding them. The Dieticians Assoc of Australia, for instance, is funded by Nestle and Kelloggs…The Heart Foundation’s “tick” program is paid for…

    [Reply]

    Ang Reply:

    Sure, but thats why I used Cancer Council as an example. You will not find them associating with or endoring these multi national food companies or pharmacetical companies.

    [Reply]

    Mike Reply:

    There is a simple enough reason for this, most of the individuals and bodies you mention are all to a lesser or greater extent all advocates of conventional dietary wisdom (see here: http://paleoworks.wordpress.com/2011/11/25/what-is-paleo). As such they together with the pharmaceutical and food manufacturing industries and even governmental agencies are all part of the greatest health scam of the century.

    [Reply]

  • http://Www.klraudio.com Grahame Rees

    Wow Sarah you sure opened up pandora’s box.People need to consider what is right for them and you have been open about your choice to trial the Paleo way of eating.Each individual is able to with trial and error find out what diet works best for them.Some people then try to impose their Beliefs on how others should eat.If Vegan works for you great.It does not work for me and that’s great too.
    Then there are people who suggest animals are ruining the earth,well yes maybe the one called human.The great opportunity is that animals can turn around land degradation,build healthy soils and feed populations with just the inputs of sunlight and water.Most of the world is rangelands that only supports animals,Africa can feed itself if only the infrastructure was there to move it to where it is needed.Healthy food starts with healthy soil,healthy people start with healthy soil.There is another way(science is done) I can take anyone and show you great examples of how great Aussie farmers are creating healthy soils,healthy animals,healthy food which results in healthy food.

    [Reply]

  • http://angieathome.blogspot.com/ Angela

    I used to think that a healthy diet had to have grain in it. I suffered for years with bowel problems, terrible allergies and joint pain. Eventually I gave up gluten and felt much, much better, then I gave up sugar after reading your blog, and again, felt very good. I relapsed, and recognised that sugar and fructose really are not for me.

    But the best effect on my health has to be going paleo. Strictly speaking, I’m not 100% paleo. I can’t always source grass-fed meat, but I try for free range and organic. I still eat cheese, but not too much, and lately, with the silly season, I have been eating sugar. But I’ve kept grain out of my diet, and after about a month, I have noticed that I no longer suffer from the “creaky” joints I had, my back pain has lessened, and I never have the bloating I suffered from for years.
    I’m not sure how much weight I’ve lost (the scales are not my friend) , but I do feel lighter, and healthier.
    For my body – paleo makes sense.

    Sarah, I love your blog, I love that you give us references to read for ourselves, and I love that you encite debate. Thanks!

    [Reply]

  • Karen

    I think we should also consider the health benefits for those on a Paleo diet who suffer from autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, chrons disease, even kids with ADHD etc.
    Research has indicated that these people suffer terrible consequences if they consume legumes, diary or grains vegetarians advocate. Various doctors are investigating these things, see Loren Cordain’s work http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8901290975296745403#, Ashton Embry http://www.direct-ms.org/journalarticles.html, Terry Wahls (a doctor with secondary progressive MS who is now doing research in this area and follows a strict version of the Paleo diet which got her back out of a tilt back wheelchair) http://www.terrywahls.com/, Dr Campbell Mcbride Gaps protocol http://gapsdiet.com/ and Dr Haas and biochemist Elaine Gottschalls Specific Carbohydrate Diet http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/beginners_guide/beginners.htm. These are just a few off the top of my head.
    These diets although viewed as alternative are just going back to wholefood basics and they provide such relief to people who are very ill. I believe that no one diet is right for everyone we each need to work out our own diet that suits our makeup as Chris Kresser advocates in his beyond Paleo approach http://chriskresser.com/beyondpaleo. I am also aware that vegan diets are recommended for those with MS, however the research wasn’t conducted properly, but if someone told me it worked for them I would not try to force a different approach upon them. I myself follow a wholefoods diet I don’t label it because I set off my own autoimmune process when I consume nuts, fruit, legumes, grains and dairy. I even react badly to quinoa and buckwheat. If I want to live a relatively pain free life I need to eat grass fed meat, fish, veges and good fats with a bit of good dark choc as a treat, this is not by choice but by necessity. If I don’t follow this diet I am too sick to be of benefit to society humans and non-humans alike.

    I am studying Sustainability at university and I realise the implication of farming on the land and the benefits of crops such as grains to starving people in the third world. Much work is to be done regarding what we do and don’t eat but this is one element of a much larger puzzle regarding human (especially Western humans) consumption patterns in the take, make, waste capitalist society in which we live. I think rather than being negative towards each other we should direct our energies towards doing what we can as individuals to move towards a more sustainable pattern of consumption and lifestyle. For those that need to eat meat do your best to support your local farmers that use sustainable farming methods I eat meat from Gilgai Farms http://www.gilgaifarms.com.au/ecological.html and you would not meet more passionate farmers, passionate for sustainability, the land they look after, the treatment of the animals they graze and the health of their consumers. For those that choose not to eat meat then be sure to support those local farmers using sustainable practices that supply your choice of food intake.
    Realistically for a sustainable future we are going to probably need a variety of diets and overall just eat less. I think what you are doing Sarah to promote dietary alternatives in mainstream media to those that have Western illnesses is fantastic. Unfortunately you will always get those that are too reluctant to consider alternatives or choose to accept differences in others and thus just lash out in retaliation to what challenges their own ideology. Keep spreading the word.

    [Reply]

    Jodie Reply:

    Fantastic, well said Karen I agree – Jodie

    [Reply]

    Casey Reply:

    I agree Karen. Due to health issues my son and I would not be able to be vegetarian. Grains, legumes, nuts, dairy, sugar, corn and nightshade vegetables are out for us. Animal fats, bone broth and meat have proven very beneficial for our health. However, 80% of our meal consists of vegetables.

    [Reply]

    Lindel Reply:

    Karen, I’m sorry I don’t mean to be rude, but I was wondering do you have MS. My sister does and she doesn’t have meat or any fats. Just wondering if I could give her any information. Thankyou.

    [Reply]

    Karen Reply:

    Hi Lindel, Its a long story but they thought I might have MS this year, so I did a bit of research. I already have Chrons disease and thyroid issues. I am still under investigation but looks like it might be spinal cord compression further down in my lumbar spine I have a MRI of that area Saturday, my brain and upper MRI’s didn’t show lesions.

    Your sister is probably following the alternative MS protocol low fat and no meat I forget the doctors name but this is followed by many MSers. Your sister might want to watch this presentation by Loren Cordain on MS http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8901290975296745403#, also
    Ashton Embry’s site is all MS related he advocates Paleo for MS he started researching due to his son suffering from the disease http://www.direct-ms.org/journalarticles.html, and most important she should visit Terry Wahls website (a doctor with secondary progressive MS who is now doing research in this area and follows a strict version of the Paleo diet which got her back out of a tilt back wheelchair) http://www.terrywahls.com/ and start following her on Facebook. Terry Wahls has a book out Up from the Chair.
    These are all good places for your sister to start. This information points towards lots of fresh veges, good quality meat and fats for MS health.
    Also the MS recovery diet book is along the same lines but low fat.

    I wish your sister all the improvements in the world. If she is ready for a change some of this information may be helpful and offer encouragement that recovery or prevention of further degeneration can occur.
    Karen xx

    [Reply]

  • Kate D

    While I love all the discussion about Paleo, did I miss the big announcement that was to be made today? I hope it wasn’t in the middle of all the comments . . .

    [Reply]

  • http://holistichealingandcfs.wordpress.com/ amy

    What an great post! Go Sarah! I do not think anyone consuming a ‘paleo’ type diet condones animal cruelty. Most find the most ethical way to access such produce. Unfortunately so many suffer debilitating health problems and not consuming complete, high quality protein from animals is just being cruel to themselves. And it seems rare for anyone to live well long term without complete protein.

    [Reply]

  • Cc

    I admit that of all the ‘diets’ out there, this one resonates with me the most. A former Vegetarian and one time vegan, once I went back to eating meat, I never felt better. More alert, more energy, more grounded. I feel more relaxed in my body, soaking up the goodness. My once flailing iron levels have tripled and I don’t have a calcium deficiency anymore. Sure, it’s not for everyone and I respect people’s decision to be veg/vegan.

    However, after reading a lot of these comments and with so much emphasis these days on ‘eat this, eat that’, I really want to point out what I feel to be of equal importance to the foods we nourish ourselves with and that is, self acceptance. It makes me a little sad that so many of us, myself often included, are so hard on ourselves to be a certain weight. Of course, a lot of weight loss is health related and I admit to feeling a hell of a lot better and more confidant when I start to drop the kgs. However, after decades of self critisism and hard rules, I’ve realised the first step is in loving and accepting my body as it is while at the same time, giving it the nourishing food it deserves. Being gentle on yourself takes practice but like Sarah said in a previous post on Louise Hay”s affirmations, lets all tell ourselves, “I love you- insert your name- exactly as you are”.

    [Reply]

    Rebecca Reply:

    Wonderfully written :)

    [Reply]

  • Lucy

    Very brave posting about a healthy diet that doesn’t involve the bottom of the food pyramid! A brief look at the websites of Gary Taubes or other such advocates of the low/no carb way of eating would have predicted word for word many of the opposing-camp comments posted in response. I think, given that the world’s population is fatter than ever in spite of eating less fat than ever before, it is important that a wide range of people, not just scientists, but articulate people like yourself with influence and wide readership potential continue to bring up the idea that perhaps low fat + grains isn’t all that healthy after all. Hopefully if the idea is brought up enough, enough people will start to question the current regime, and funding into some proper research into new diets may become available (or prioitised) and we may stand a chance of proving beyond a doubt that this way of eating is healthy. Keep fighting the good fight!

    [Reply]

  • Andrew

    My understanding is that the ability for humans to consume dairy is a relatively recent phenomenon (9000 years and less) and an example of evolution at work. See
    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/10/science/10cnd-evolve.html.
    As I read all the various fundamentalist views and conspiracy theories on both sides of the dietary debate I wonder if it is possible we have evolved to consume grains without problem. I’m not saying stuff your face, but that they are part of a balanced diet.

    [Reply]

    Rebecca Reply:

    I thought 70% of the worlds population was lactose intolerant as as a species we do not need the lactose provided from dairy milk past the age of 5 (when we should of been weened of our mothers milk by) and so our bodies cannot naturally process it? X

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    Dairy would not have appeared in our diet until after we learned to farm. I assume that accounts for high rates of lactose intolerance in the general population. Others that humans have in high rates are gluten intolerance and fructose intolerance. That takes care of grains and fruit. The fruit one is interesting because our nearest relative, the chimpanzee, is a big fruit eater. We seem to have parted ways long ago on this one.

    Interestingly, though it does exist, intolerance and allergies to red meat are extremely rare in the human population.

    Note: I don’t have any intolerances so bring on the cheese!

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    It is not that we are fructose intolerant but that we live in a society where our diets are overloaded with fructose and our bodies are unable to process the amount we put in. If ones source of fructose was simply from fruit, it would not cause problems.

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  • xonar383

    held by civilization, with co-operation, I look alone (up to now north. I use lines or incorrect. A tautology the way the stain of dying, no one will extensively flowing, floating hair cloth, whilst they toss far from all imagery, of
    -tr4vis-

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  • Alex

    Oh my gosh the comments!! What good is it eating vegan/paleo/whatever else if you send your BP skyrocketing getting mad on the internet! I feel like it is relevant to point out that there is inherent privilege in being able to choose either of these ways of eating, and judgement and shaming of other people’s food choices is kind of shitty.

    Anyway. I have been adopting more primal eating into my diet and I feel great because of it. I eat tons of eggs, a fair amount of full fat yogurt, meat about 5 times a week and I feel full so much easier than before. I still have some sourdough, white rice, and coffee in my diet because I don’t notice the ill effects others experience but I do feel better eating them as an occasional part of a meal, not the main component 3 times a day.

    Looking forward to more of the articles Sarah!

    [Reply]

    picardie.girl Reply:

    Love your comment “there is inherent privilege in being able to choose either of these ways of eating, and judgement and shaming of other people’s food choices is kind of shitty”.

    [Reply]

  • Jane

    I’ve been on and off paleo for a year or so now. The few times I’ve gone off it, I get ill and run down relatively quickly. In the last case 6 weeks of infection and virus accompanied my return to a dairy and grain based diet. Within days of going back to paleo skin rashes, edema, fatigue all started to disappear.

    And I’m not even strict, I follow primal eating (Mark Sisson from Mark’s Daily Apple) rather than full on paleo – a little wine, a little coffee, though no dairy and no grains and no supplements except fish oil and vitamin d.

    Dr Terry Wahls (check her out on Tedx) cured her MS following strict paleo.

    I know I feel better without (much) processed food, grains and dairy in my life. Having said that, it’s not for everyone and it doesn’t need to be, there’s no ‘right’ way to eat or be healthy and happy – whatever works.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.lastchancetraining.com.au Liz@LastChanceTraining

    I believe there are many benefits when leaning towards a Paleo way of eating. However, IT IS NOT THE ONLY WAY :) and many of the claims the Paleo movement makes are unsubstantiated.
    For a really good overview of the subject, you can’t go past Leigh Peele’s article.
    Here’s the link.
    Made so much sense to me.
    I eat grains in small quantities, I have vegetarian days and days where I eat animal flesh. I don’t consume obvious junk, sugars or fats. I weigh at 42 what I did at high school.
    http://www.leighpeele.com/the-paleo-diet-fad-religion-or-solution

    [Reply]

  • Cath

    I agree with Alex, I am appalled at some of these comments. Debate is important but the spiteful condemnation of well meaning contribution gets us, as a community on this blog, not very far at all. The diet sounds interesting. After reading sarah’s blogs over time I have reduced sugar (although I did not consume a great deal to begin with and have not felt the need to say no to a piece of birthday cake if the occasion is there) and am now eating fewer grains and more fats in the form of full cream milk, more cheese, a little more meat, more eggs, and lots of veggies of course. I never ate much fruit because I always found it too sweet. I feel good. I will be interested to see how this affects my cholesterol which has been a little high in the past… Will it have improved or skyrocketed? I hope the former. Cheese is my friend!

    [Reply]

  • Molly

    I would still prefer to eat Dr. Atkins diet over this one. That said, I still eat all sorts of processed foods since I don’t eat red meat or pork.
    This whole fear of fat that culminated from the 80′s diet fads is tiresome and one of the reasons (I think) people are found to be vitamin D deficient. Vitamin D is a fat soluble nutrient and if one isn’t eating enough fat…well that person will be deficient.

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    Molly,
    It is not the fat that will kill you but the processed foods that will.

    [Reply]

  • Deanna

    All living creatures need some sort of nourishment to survive whether it be meat-based or plant-based and, like animals, humans’ needs vary too. With so much obesity and disease around these days, it is high time we looked at alternatives to our current diets and I believe that there can be a lot to learn by looking at how our ancestors ate as ONE option for undoing the damage that today’s western diet has caused. Thanks Sarah for giving us another alternative to consider:)

    [Reply]

  • erin

    There are some very passionate people here, probably with very valid points that are being lost in the way messages are coming across. This can happen a bit on this blog (and others I’m sure).

    There is no need to be mean to each other just because we disagree, I doubt the aggression will help convince anyone to change their minds on an issue. I started skipping some of the comments because they were repetitive and so angry.

    [Reply]

    picardie.girl Reply:

    Me too!

    [Reply]

  • Chloe

    Great blog Sarah. As an ex-vegan I know that once upon a time I would have had a knee jerk reaction to the ideas you’re presenting too, but scrolling through the comments I see a lot of support as well. I’ve been gradually transitioning to a diet that makes sense to me from both a health and ethical standpoint (it’s pretty similar to the primal diet promoted by Mark Sisson), & your blog has been an invaluable resource for recipes as well as some information specific to women and those with AI (I’m celiac and have psoriasis). I’m really looking forward to future entries on this topic. Thanks again for putting a somewhat contentious (but well researched) viewpoint out there.

    [Reply]

  • picardie.girl

    Oh my god, what stressful reading! Going to stay away from most of the comments on this one.

    I’ve heard a lot about animal protein contributing to cancer… but to be honest, I think I’m going to have to ignore most of the eating stuff I read and just listen to my body. Every time I see an eating post on here, I feel excited – and then guilty, and stressed, and a bit of a failure.

    Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Sound thinking…it shouldn’t be a stress…

    [Reply]

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  • Long Term Paleo

    Has anyone been on a Paleo diet for longer than 12 months? I have read many blogs and heard stories of people who have felt great for the first 6-12 months then begin getting sick and finding their bodies deteriorating, all of which was rectified immediately on re-introducing small amounts of grains.

    [Reply]

    Sandra Reply:

    I have been following a “paleo” diet for going on 2 years now. From time to time I will indulge in some bread or a bowl of cereal or pasta. It all depends on the quality if I react or not. The one and only time I ate wheat to my hearts content I ended up in the ER because the doctor thought my appendix was about to burst.

    [Reply]

    Marielize Reply:

    Almost 4 years now! Although I constantly refine my habits as more information comes along. For me it is impossible to go back to my previous ways as I now know too much and feel too good.

    Interesting to know that a lot of Paleo followers are X low-carbers and recovering vegans and vegetarians as both those groups seems to have an interest in health and caring for the environment.

    [Reply]

    Marielize Reply:

    oh, and by the way, I think most people get sick within days after putting grains back. Some people seems to feel better increasing carbohydrate from veg and things like sweet potatoes. Grains will almost always put you back on the joint pain, migraine etc road.
    stay well (-:

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Mark Sisson gets the crown for 30+ years and counting on a Paleo-style diet.

    [Reply]

  • fawn

    Thank you for sharing your experiences. Please let us know how it goes in the long run. I cannot help but perceive “paleo” to be a form of fanaticism, as I do staunch vegan, raw food, and other diets that eliminate foods we’ve been eating for thousands of years. It’s the way we’ve been doing things for the last 100 years that is a little bit scary.

    :)

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    You can be fanatic about ANY diet, if you choose to be so!

    [Reply]

  • Kelly

    As consumers we have the power to influence the quality of life of the animals that are used to produce our food. As more of us choose to purchase ethically produced meats the more readily available and econimical they will become. I know that I get run down and ill if I don’t eat meat. I, like many, have huge concerns about animal welfare within industrial meat and dairy production. I therefore try and understand the provenance of the meat I eat and buy grass fed, free range etc etc whenever I can afford it. I’m also happy to eat less of such meat in order to be able to afford it over the alternatives more regularly. Eating meat does not make you a less compassionate, caring or ethical person.

    oh – and as someone who is currently experiencing MASSIVE symptom relief (gut, skin, allergies) whilst on a grain exclusion trial I’m more than prepared to accept that their are a range of ‘foods’ that fall into the category of ‘just because we can eat it, doesn’t mean we should’.

    [Reply]

  • Kelly

    Also – I’m yet to find any evidence that there are vitamins and minerals etc that we need in grains that can’t be obtained through vegetables, fruit and meat. If anyone can find such evidence please let us know!

    [Reply]

  • Laura

    Thanks Sarah. I have been paleo for months and the kilos have been falling off. I don’t feel overly full or deprived – it just feels right.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.paleofx.com/ KC

    The best thing we could do is leave the Vegan’s and their tribal fans to fend for themselves. In Paleo times, no silly tribe following a diet that would lead to early demise (like Vegan’s do) would try to stop another. There was apt competition for food resources and if a tribe felt compelled to eat something that was inferior (as mis-guided as that was), the other tribe would simply sit back and follow their own course and allow for survival of the fittest. 2050 will come soon enough and Vegan sustainability nonsense will not be the discussion of the day, their lack of longevity and prolific incidence of neolithic diseases will be thoroughly documented and show the clear difference.

    For now, go for it Vegans…your position and diet leaves more meat and fat for the rival tribe to thrive on. Happy hunting :)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.paleofx.com/ KC

    And by the way, my biomarkers are way better in the months that I’ve been following this lifestyle. http://www.beingprimal.com/paleo-case-study-change-or-die with more photos on my FB profile so show that Paleo works. https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2021123167901.2105937.1238590218&type=3

    [Reply]

  • Lara

    Thank you Sarah! Excellent post and a great summary for those of us who struggle to explain the logic of why we eat this way to those who love us (and those who criticise us out of fear, jealousy or ignorance). I’m so grateful to have read your article in the mainstream media, I just wish the tides would change more quickly! Love, Lara xo

    [Reply]

  • http://seeyourtoes.com Dean Ouellette

    Sarah, Saw your site was also included in Jimmy Moore’s list today. Have added it to my RSS, great job looking forward to reading more in the future and possibly connecting online!

    [Reply]

    Dean Ouellette Reply:

    Also are you on Google+ ? Didnt see you there

    [Reply]

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  • kerry

    are nuts and seeds consumed on the paleo diet? i ask because it seems to be assumed that quinoa is a grain when, in fact, it is a seed.

    [Reply]

  • miss jodi

    this ongoing vendetta between eating meat and not eating meat (vegetarians vs meat eaters and vice versa) is not the issue here. if it was, i am sure the post would be about either/or. many folk responding have in no uncertain terms made it about just that, however and the issue has become lost in a lot of un necessary insults, righteous and opinionated hyperbole that serves no one. or any purpose other than to instigate and irritate others, and incite negativity.
    here we are, more than a week later, still reading comments about what is healthier……..to eat meat or to be a vegetarian/vegan person? who has a vested interest in promoting meat/whatever? what is a more ‘conscious’ way of living?
    guess what folks? we live in tone of the most diverse and free countries on this earth right now in real time. here we are celebrating tolerance in multicultural affairs, gay marriage, we go where we want, do what we want……….we have so many choices about how we live………..reading some of these hugely provocative and heated comments, you would not think we live with such privileges. we cannot even get along with each other. people switch off reading comment after comment about what’s better. who has the health and moral high ground because of what we do or do not eat in whatever form. it is incredible. i do not think we deserve this ‘entitlement to our opinion’ that so many spout on about.
    people will not be convinced or even interested in anything anyone has to say if there is an attack or challenge on their choices. not opinions. an opinion is nothing more than that. it does not promote discussion, common ground or negotiation.
    folks are so indignant and rude in their responses to one another. FACT: there are as many forms of healthy ways of living as here are nationalities, choices and houses we live in. there are many who promote these many ways of eating. we are free to follow whichever path is right for us. all roads lead to truth. whatever that may be for different folk. but we are not going to make friends or influence anyone with our example if we alienate and ostracise others who do a different thing to what we do, in this instance, the way we eat. that goes for both sides. maybe we don’t want to make friends. in that case we shouldn’t be joining this debate or offering anything that does not contribute to the diversity that is our society and what that actually means.
    i have read sarah’s blog for about two years and i have been a vegetarian for over 12. how she decides to eat, is right for her. she is sharing her journey. there are many many recipes on this website that actually don’t have meat in them. i am creative enough to use what i can in others and substitute meat for veggie options. what she does has no bearing on what i choose to do or how i eat, and i make no judgement on her choices.
    do you think all meat eaters agree on things? no. are all vegetarians united in every aspect of their food choices? no. do vegetarians and vegans share the same principles on every issue? certainly if there were just vegetarians and vegans in this world we would still find cause for dissent.
    i have a couple of vegetarian friends who i don’t see much and a vegan friend who i have only met twice. everyone else around me eats meat. those who are closest to me and i love dearly, all eat meat. every one. we all respect one another’s choices and it is harmonious. i do not believe i have a moral high ground. i love all humanity, including the folk who eat meat. we cannot say we are truly peaceful unless this is the way, regardless.
    i am no better than anyone. some of the folk who are the most dear to me are among the most honest and authentic people i have ever met. more so than me. not eating meat does not make me a good or a complete person. there is a long way to go before i could be ok with calling myself a good person.
    sorry about the long response but i feel this needs to be said.

    [Reply]

    ms jane Reply:

    Finally the voice of reason! Well said x

    [Reply]

  • Harry Hotsox

    Hi Sarah. I am new to this blog so this topic might have been explored in the past, but I am wondering if you have considered that blood type might be a factor worth looking at. I have been sugar-free for three months but still have some grains – oats for breakfast, rye bread for lunch. I am blood type A which, according to author Peter D’Adamo, has only existed for 10,000 years and began as a means of humans coping with the agrarian revolution. Type A’s are well equipped to deal with grains. Type O people are best suited to deal with meat. According to him, type O’s find paleo type diets very successful, type A’s and B’s not so. If his theory is correct, then low carb, high fat diets might not suit everybody. What do you think?

    [Reply]

  • Peter Bowler

    With no pun intended at all I find humans can be strange cattle indeed.
    The vehemence of some replies within this page has surprised me. I find the personal nature of those replies has disappointing.
    Sarah decided, after having heard about this ‘alternative’ eating plan, to front up and take it on so she could speak from an informed and personal experience.
    I have been ‘eating clean’ for approx 3 months now. I initially started eating close to 100% Paleo and after a month or so have chosen to ease off from a strict adherence for practical purposes, this is known as eating clean.
    My wife does not follow the program. She is a health professional and has some concerns about my change of diet considering my age (56) with respect to bones among other things.
    I sleep better than I have for years. I have lost 5kg since removing most of the dairy, grains and legumes from my eating plan. I train very hard 4-5 days per week and have plenty of energy and my recovery from exercise is just short of phenomenal.
    I have coached people in the past to pay attention to environmental feedback – my personal environment is feeding back to me that I have made a positive change to my eating program.
    If the passionate respondents were to redirect their passion to those who mistreat animals then everyone who chooses to eat animal protein will have healthier protein in their diet.

    [Reply]

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  • http://www.purplesage.com.au kim

    What a contentious topic!

    Here’s my two cents worth…

    1. I question the inclusion of ANY commercial dairy in a diet that you espouse to be non fiddled with. Even full fat dairy has been significantly processed so that molecularly it is not recognisable as the stuff that originally came out of the cow (or sheep or goat). Unless, of course you have a source of raw unhomogenised milk??

    2. As a naturopath, I often have clients attend the clinic who follow this diet. Inevitably, they have a number of health issues: constipation, bad breath and low mood. I think that the focus of the paleo diet on meat and fat is the problem. My understanding is that traditional diets were mainly vegetables, with occasional fruit, an irregular gorging on meat and fat, and some herbs and nuts. I don’t think that it was part of the traditional diet to be having meat, eggs, coconut, bone broths etc on a daily basis. Maybe meat and animal fats can be as addictive as sugar and carbs.

    [Reply]

  • Peter Bowler

    Well said MIss Jodi…more power to you

    [Reply]

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  • http://www.RecycledGrace.etsy.com Grace

    I am gluten, sugar, egg, dairy, corn, honey, etc :) free b/c of health issues also. I totally eat a paleo diet and have been for years – and LOVE it. :) My main concern, though, is the lack of carbs to produce serotonin in the brain, as I have depression issues also. I tend to feel better emotionally with a couple of apples a day – along with the sweet potaotes and the like in my ‘normal’ diet. However, due to candida issues too, I don’t like the side effects of too many carbs/sugars – no matter their source.

    Any suggestions? and thanks! :)

    [Reply]

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  • http://danasher@tumblr.com Dan

    Taking anything moral out of the picture for just a second, it comes down to consuming energy. We can waste a large amount of our own energy collecting and preparing grasses and grains and other fruits and vege, or we can choose to use animals like cows and sheep to process acres of grass into something more calorically dense such as meat. This way we save our own energy, the cows spread the plant seeds and maintain the soil, and they also convert the energy of grass (which we can’t consume anyway) into an edible form that we can eat. Nature is a wonderful thing! Domestication only makes it easier for us to access these meaty energy sources rather than having to hunt them down.

    The fact we evolved over 100′s of thousands of years doing exactly this is no mistake.

    I think everyone would benefit from taking off their blinkers and actually doing some research of their own in to all sides of the story. Once you’ve read through all the current material it becomes fairly obvious that what is currently prescribed aint working and people need to take control of their own health and wellbeing whatever fashion that takes.

    Finally, step back, relax. Stress will kill you much quicker than a vegan/paleo diet will!

    [Reply]

    Eugene Reply:

    Yes, I think range-fed cows are more efficient and are treated much better than the intensively farmed pork and chicken. But there are still improvements to be done – we’re continuing to evolve ;)

    [Reply]

    Dan Reply:

    I disagree, with modern medicine there is no evolutionary pressure. The most sick and decrepit of people are able to conceive with the assistance of technology, so this has zero positive impact on our evolution. If anything we are devolving…

    [Reply]

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