The I Quit Sugar program: experimenting (week 5)

Posted on January 30th, 2012

Hello! Detoxing much? Trying some of the detoxing/sweet help I suggest in the ebook? What’s working?

by Always With Honor

Some quick housekeeping

* OK, I’m doing my first webinar tonight. I’m doing it on ustream and you’ll need to either go to my #IQS Facebook page or here (if you’re not on Facebook) to register. You’ll be able to “chat” with me and post questions…and it should be fun and it SHOULD work…

Three things:

  1. I will have to do this at 6pm, NOT 6.30pm AEST now. I hope this doesn’t muck any of you around.
  2. If it does, the video will be up on ustream and Facebook…I’ll send around links tomorrow.
  3. This is a bit of an experiment for me…so bear with me…fingers crossed it worked (and please suggest any tips!)

* Little reminder: it’s your last day to register for Febfast. Go on. Do it. Here.

PS I was on The Circle this morning chatting about Febfast…there I am…And will be chatting with Yumi and Chrissie Swan on radio – The 3pm Pickup - tomorrow about #IQS…tune in.

A few elevator pitch statements

OK…all that aside I thought I’d share a few elevator pitch statements with you that come in handy when people say, “what’s this no sugar thing, in a nutshell”? People only want nutshell, chomper-size soundbites, mostly. So serve it up to them!

* In caveman days sugar – or fructose – was so rare that when we DID stumble on it, we were designed to binge on it AND store it instantly as fat. Our biology hasn’t changed in the 10,000 years since the agricultural revolution, nor since the 1800s when sugar was introduced. We’re still designed to binge on it and store it as fat.

* Fructose is the only food molecule that we a) don’t have a corresponding enzyme in our brain that says “we’ve had enough” and b) that goes straight to the liver as fat.

* Yep, sure sugar is natural. Fruit is natural. But so is arsenic and petroleum.

* Our grandparents didn’t eat four pieces of fruit a day. Plus the fruit back then didn’t contain as much sugar. Fruit day has been “bred” to be sweeter.

* A glass of Coke and a glass of apple juice – the same amount of sugar is in each…about 10-12 teaspoons.

Of course, if this fails…you might want to just point out how good you’re looking.

Or show them this lovely comment from Matt, which I thought I should share in case you missed it on the forums:

I’ve lost 11kgs to date, now am at a perfect weight for my height and eat as ‘much’ (quantity-wise) as I used to but am now eating the right things. Really important difference, as I’ve discovered. I’m bouncy, have clear, glowing skin and am just generally enjoying life without the lethargic, dark cloud that was sugar hanging over me constantly. Back to acting how a young guy should be acting, really.

A reader questioned whether it was more about doing exercise than just being about sugar….

To be honest Leila, when I read posts on this blog, I think the same thing. Oh, they must have exercised while quitting sugar, done something else etc. Other than lifting the occasional 20kg dumbbell in my backyard (which I have always done, mind you) I’ve exercised no more than usual.

The whole experience has just been incredible. I started at 98kg in November last year, am now at 87kg as of this morning.

I followed Sarah’s recommendations, but went cold turkey on all sugar from the first day of the plan. I still ate berries over the entire experiment (couldn’t cut it all out) and loved my coconut products, nuts, bread, eggs, cheese, yoghurt etc. I even continued to eat pizza (thin base, home made, fresh topping and minimal sauce) and pasta (pre-made Latino branded stuff even) about 1 or 2 times a week. As long as it fell into Sarah (and David Gillespie’s) sugar content per 100g guidelines, I just stuck by it.

I have strong willpower when I want to do something, so sticking to the plan was easy for me (once I got through the first 2-3 weeks).

I love my fruit, but used to eat it in such copious amounts. I also have a very sweet tooth, so it was something I wanted to change.

Living this experiment has just opened me up to a whole new way of living life. It has become everything Sarah talks about and more.

Obviously no person is the same, so it will work differently for everyone. I’m also a student, with no kids so I can worry about myself a lot more than I’m sure parents can.

You’ve just got to stick to in for the long haul and the results will come!

A detox product to try

I love this tea by Aphroditea, run by Therese and her sister. Their Clarity tea has licorice, anniseed, peppermint and fennel in it – great for digestion and for a “sweet hit” and their Harmony tea is PERFECT for anyone having detox pain: black cohosh, dong quai, licorice, ashwaganda, St John’s Wort etc…Buy it here.

Some readers’ tips for craving curbers

Some of you have provided some GREAT tips… thought I should share cos they’re really rather brilliant.

Emma says: I chill a tart tea (like cranberry, raspberry or pomegranate) & then add this instead of juice to smoothies, or in baked items like pancakes.

Mia says: I find a glass of milk works if I am craving sweetness. I don’t know why, but it seems (much like coconut oil) to taste sweet without being sugary. Other than that, my favourite thing at the moment is a coconut juice & natural yoghurt smoothie with berries and cocoa powder in! The berries sweeten it up just enough so the cocoa tastes chocolatey. Yuuuum.

The Clean Beauty Blog says:I’ve replaced dried fruit in my porridge with a spoonful of coconut oil, pinch of cinnamon & chia seeds – so delicious and healthy!

toni says: The funny thing is that, after being sugar-free for 11 weeks, so much food with little or no sugar tastes sweet to me now…for instance a squeeze of lemon or lime juice in a dressing sets my tastebuds quivering, my organic beef chilli with a touch of cinnamon and cocoa powder almost tastes like dessert, coconut water (YUM!), corn fritters with harissa and barambah yoghurt on top, the list goes on! It’s amazing how sharp and refined your tastebuds become, just like your mental clarity really.

Claire says: My big tip is: Artisana Coconut Butter – this is not the same as coconut oil, it is a whole food made from the whole coconut, so includes the flesh. It is the most heavenly, divine, rich, delicious creation ever.

Jemma says: My fave treat at the moment is mixing big dollops of Barambah Organic yoghurt (the 97% one) with a little stevia, some cinnamon and vanilla powder when craving something rich and sweet -it’s soooo delish. I’m also having a couple of teaspoons of coconut butter for dessert which I find more satisfying than 85% dark choc….it’s divine!

Cathy F says: Spiced Pumpkin Soup – saute 1 chopped onion, 1 crushed & chopped garlic glove, 1 tbsp chopped fresh root ginger, 1 small red chilli – deseeded & finely chopped, 1 entire root washed & chopped coriander. Saute these ingredients first in about 1-2 tbspns coconut oil. Then add 1 chopped butternut (or any other) pumpkin. Saute on low with lid on for another 5-8 mins. Add enough homecooked vegie OR chicken stock (I used chicken) to cover pumpkin mixture + add one bayleaf, sea salt & peppper. Cook until pumpkin just tender – about 10 mins. Let cool a little & puree. Add 2 tbspns coconut milk & garnish with chopped coriander leaves.

extra reading

Some of you have asked about kids’ lunches…here are some links that might help

The Nourished Kitchen has posted 10 days of healthy, sugar-free school lunches (they tend to be on the paleo end of the spectrum)

This post has a few healthy kids “treat” ideas, but only half are sugar-free.

And these coconut chips might just get you out of a pickle!

See you at 6pm and don’t forget to post your questions below. I’ll be answering them tonight and in next week’s newsletter…

 

Related Posts with Thumbnails
  • http://findingclairity.blogspot.com Clair

    Ah…thank you SO much for the elevator pitches. I KNOW sugar doesn’t sit well with me at all, but when people say, “But isn’t it natural to eat sugar?”, I always have some trouble articulating the complexities of that.

    And just to add to the list, I love mixing stevia with nut butter and almond milk until it forms a paste…sort of like eating thick pudding. It’s great when I don’t have any sugarfree desserts on hand!

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  • Kay

    Agreed – the elevator pitches are great, thank you!
    I’ve had so many “What’s wrong with fruit juice? It has vitamins.” conversations. A simple comparison to coke is much easier to explain to people.

    On another note, I was wondering if I could put in an early request for some “How to survive Easter” tips in a post (or even as a question to other readers)?

    Every Easter, the relatives give the kids truckloads of the cocoa/sugar/vegetable fat combo that is compound chocolate (the really cheap and nasty stuff too – eek!) So this year I’m on a mission to find some recipes for Easter-type treats that will keep the kids happy without the crazy sugar overload.

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    Rachael Reply:

    Just tell your kids the Easter Bunny is on the IQS program, so no chocolate this year!

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    Kate Reply:

    Could you possibly have a conversation with your relatives re: quality over quantity. Ask them to give the kids one Lindt or Green & Blacks chocolate bunny for instance, instead of a bunch of crappy ‘chocolates’.

    I saw a brand of sugar free chocolate called Well Naturally in Coles recently. Appears to be sweetened with stevia. You could melt that or something like it, put it into some easter moulds (egg, bunny shaped etc.) and package them up in little bags.

    Bliss balls with raw cacao, nuts and a few dates taste pretty great. Obviously not sugar free with the dates, but still a lot better than masses of cheap chocolate. You could also make some sugar free granola bars or similar, and add a small packet of chocolate eggs for an Easter touch.

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  • Naz

    Shame that it will be 2am here when the webinar is on! Hopefully I can watch it later as I don’t think I can will myself to stay up haha.

    Last week at work was quiet hard I work part-time teaching cooking classes and the menu had a few dishes with sugar in them and I was able to get away from testing those foods, I really didn’t feel like having to explain why I wasn’t eating with everyone afterwards!

    Anyhow I think my biggest worry, which I have also stated in last week’s postings is that I haven’t had any withdrawal symptoms as such and was wondering why that could be? Also doing the whole full-fat thing has me a bit stumped, yes I have switched to eating full fat yogurt and whole-milk cheese etc but portion wise I’m not sure what the best approach is.

    Looking forward to watching the webinar…good luck Sarah!

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  • Matt

    Thanks for the mention Sarah, I’m chuffed! :D

    Also I’ve been thinking along the same lines as Kay in regards to Easter… Carob Easter bunnies, anyone?

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  • dana

    Hey there, the ‘did you love this? get updates by email’ button – what does that acutally mean? comments? weekly newsletter?

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    weekly newsletter!

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  • http://wabiblog.com amber

    That was a really interesting chat about FebFast on The Circle. As someone who rarely drinks, I found the insights just fascinating. My choice not to drink is predominantly health related, so I’d never deeply considered some of these other factors.

    I’m still on the IQS wagon, but I have had a few lapses with HONEY. Argh I love that stuff. The thing I notice about myself when I consume sugar is that I get hungry so much more and so much more quickly.

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Me too. When i have a little sugar now…I just want to eat more. I literally don’t do anything else until I get a little bit of protein into me, and that calms things down.

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    Kate Reply:

    I can so relate to that. Yesterday I ate out, and ended up having a few macarons. Well after that I was ravenous, and just kept looking around for more things to eat until I felt sick. I’ve also noticed that since quitting (well, mostly quitting anyway) sugar, even berries are starting to have that effect on me.

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    ms jane Reply:

    YEAH!!! I made a pavlova for my son’s birthday and had just the tiniest bit…and then ate half of it. I felt like a junkie! Just one little taste and I felt hooked again. The next day I was okay until after dinner and then got hit with the strongest craving but today is much better. I was a bit shocked at how intense it was.

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  • Tiff

    I’m entering week 4 and though i felt like a camera that had been brought into focus in the first 2 weeks, i haven’t really been feeling that different lately. Feeling exactly like ‘week 4′ says in the ebook, Like “why am i doing this again?” Not feeling the clarity people are describing and a bit jealous! I also have a not-sleeping-very-well 5month old baby and a FULL ON 2 and a half year old, so think they may be taking any extra energy i’m feeling without my noticing. Humph! Will stick with it, just feeling a little deflated. And miss-miss-missing fresh fruit. All this cheese and nuts and meat is a bit hard to get used to at first. Think i need more vegie based snack ideas. Chocolate nut balls a saviour though. YUM.

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  • Gray

    Tiff with a 5 month old and a 2 yr old I think you’re amazing to even attempt to quit sugar. Stick with it, it will help in the long run but make sure you eat enough fat to replace the sugar. Dips with veggies are easy with a toddler around. Also kale, pumpkin or daikon chips are good too. Sarah’s given the recipe for the kale chips, for pumpkin or daikon chips just slice with a mandolin or veggie peeler, coat on coconut oil, sprinkle with a little salt& bake in oven til crisp.

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    Tiff Reply:

    Yum… Thank you! Will definitely be trying that tomorrow. And thanks, i know it sounds crazy attempting it with the little ones but i thought more energy is what i ultimately need so i’ll just stick it out through the early weeks and hopefully see some results at the end.

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  • Brittany

    I love the Barambah Organic passonfruit yoghurt and it only has 4.8g of sugar per 100g. But in the ingredients list it states “organic sugar” so i don’t know if it is ok to eat. It tastes very sweet.

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  • http://www.lifegamestyle.com/ Comptess

    I’ve been fructose-free for over 2 months now, you can read my honest account of it here http://www.lifegamestyle.com/2012/01/8-weeks-no-sugar-beat-that.html.

    Unfortunately, I seem to have developed some crazy hormonal in-balance or at least symptoms that point to that. From 2 weeks in to the program, if I may get a little personal…my periods have been all over the show and the physical PMS symptoms are absolutely awful. Completely undoing the de-bloat of the first 2 weeks. This has gone on for over 6 weeks now and I highly suspect the change in diet.

    Has anyone else had this issue?

    Any advice? Obviously I am going to get the physical side of it checked out but I wonder if this could be a sugar-oestrogen problem.

    PS. Mia’s tip of drinking a glass of milk to curb sugar cravings worked a treat for me too!

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    Gray Reply:

    One thing I wasn’t aware of before IQS was that because sugar is absorbed by the body so quickly, if you’re on medication and you IQS it can muck up the absorption time and throw your system out for a while. It doesn’t seem to matter with some meds, but really makes a difference with others. It’s not a reason to not quit sugar but if you are on meds might explain certain irregularities. I did my IQS under Drs supervision so was monitored throughout as was very sick in 2011.

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    Comptess Reply:

    Thanks Gray, you might be onto something there. I assumed IQS might be having an effect on ME but I actually have a progesterone implant in my arm (gotta love science) so perhaps IQS is having an effect on that.

    Medical advice so far has been to ride it out for a while longer and see if the symptoms settle. Cross fingers.

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    Nicola Reply:

    Comptress, I would suggest that the bloatedness & irregularity is all due to the implanon. That thing worked like a dream for me for the first 6-8 months, but after that I started retaining water like nobody’s business, was bleeding all over the place, & was constantly in a bad mood. The only way I can think to describe myself at that stage was that I felt like a piece of aluminium foil trapped in the microwave. I felt like a sexpot dreamboat literally within DAYS of having it removed.

    Dom Reply:

    Hi,
    Sorry, I might be late with a response but I thought I’ll share my experience. I’m a vegetarian and I’ve been limiting my intake of dairy for quite a while now and since doing so, I’ve noticed that my periods have become much ‘cleaner’. The same goes with soy products, I have pms and cramps if use more soy . And maybe because this programme suggests replacing sugar with dairy, which can be full of hormones, even if organic, and they mess up with our hormones, this had an affect on you. It’s just my experience, but you may try to see if that helps you

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  • Hanna

    In the 8 week program we don’t actually quit all sugar for 8 weeks – given it’s a gradual removal of sugar. Should I be sugar free for a full 8 weeks before I add back any low sugar fruit?

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  • Meg

    I made some mini choc cakes with cacoa powder, coconut flour, coconut oil, cinnammon, rice syrup, egg and soy milk – gluten, dairy and fructose free. They are divine!

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    MirandaBB Reply:

    Sound yummy – can you post a recipe?

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    Bettina Reply:

    I second the recipe request!

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    Gabby Reply:

    I third the recipe request Meg! – always looking for things to put in lunchboxes or as treats.

    The link to the healthy lunchboxes made me chuckle.
    Making lunchboxes takes ages as it is (and requires careful planning to be sugar free and nut free). Those recipes look like a full time job! And I like cooking!

    Two things my kids are loving are mini frittatas – whisk eggs with a little cream, pour into regular muffin pans (silicone ones work well for this as they come out so easily) in which you have put cheese, shallots, leftover roast veggies, ham -anything you want. Bake in a moderate oven for 20 mins and whoompah! Healthy, filling and tasty – and school approved.

    The other thing is pastry scrolls – thaw a sheet of puff pastry, spread it with whatever you like – cheese and vegemite, tomato paste and ham and cheese, again whatever takes your fancy. Roll up, cut into scrolls about 2cm wide, lie flat on tray and bake for about 18mins or until golden brown. Yummy and popular.

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    Bettina Reply:

    Hi Gabby!

    Those mini frittatas sound yummy for ME as a quick, make-ahead breakfast. Usually I make eggs but sometimes I don’t have time to make them.

    I usually cook at home but sometimes I’m in a rush and turn to pre-made tofu bolognese, etc.–but all of these pre-made convenience foods have added sugar! Even though they are around 4% (4 grams of sugar for 100 grams food), I am trying to stay away from the added sugar.

    Does anybody have any ideas for make-ahead foods?

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  • seeker

    Hi Sarah,

    I hope it’s not too late in the evening to get an answer – been meaning to write for a while on this – just a question about the activated almonds – I’ve tried making them a couple of times, (I made your recipe & Lee’s) but they don’t seem to crisp up – they taste ok, but just a bit dead ….not dried out enough or at least not as crispy as i would like … I guess the water hasn’t been completely dried out?
    Anyway, I wondered if it was ok to turn the oven up after the long dehydration process and crisp them up at the end? (And can I do that after I’ve had them in their “dead” state in a jar for a few days?!!!)
    Thanks so much :)

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  • Liz

    Am I the only one who fell off the bandwagon in a big way?? Nonetheless, I’m clawing my way back on after a few too many parties.

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    Bettina Reply:

    Hi Liz,

    I’ve been quite good for all the weeks until this past weekend when I consciously decided to have a slice of cake, since I’m tasting it for my wedding in April. But then I couldn’t help but have dessert later on that night at the restaurant–also for my wedding menu, but I had decided to eat cheese for dessert, so it was totally craving and addiction that made me do it.
    And then that night I also ate two chocolates!

    I had really vivid dreams that night and woke up a few times but noticed no other effects.

    And then I’ve had no problem going back to a no-fruit, no-stevia, no sugar diet afterwards…except for boredom…

    Bettina

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    Sharon in Philly Reply:

    No, you aren’t, it was the wine that did it for me on the weekend (OK started Thursday) but I’m back on it now. I didn’t eat too much sugar just drank it, it was red wine though, no beer ;-)

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  • anna

    loved the video/webinar Sarah! can’t wait until the next one!

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  • Chloe

    Hi Sarah,

    I have been meaning to post for a while now, but just watched the webinar and felt compelled to thank you.

    Firstly, as a strict vegetarian, and on week four of cold turkey, I have found the I Quit Sugar program to be the easiest to follow and most rewarding ‘diet’ I have ever tried. I think what I’ve learnt will be with me for life. Feel great. Thanks for sharing what you have learnt through trial and error, so we don’t have to!

    And a funny story. I was at the City of Sydney free cycling course yesterday and got chatting to a chick from Waterloo (shout outs if you’re reading Nicky!). We were talking about why we were there, and both admitted we were both mad fans of yours. And both taking up cycling in the city (loving it).

    Anyway, I think you’re really empowering people through information, and inspiring them to make positive choices. Me included.

    Thanks again, and keep up the great work xxx

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Chloe, that’s unreal..what a wonderful conflation of connections. And how good is cycling…keep enjoying x

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  • Naz

    First of all thanks Sarah for responding to my 2 questions on the webinar – I asked about the veggies and the full-fat dairy portion control, your answers helped a lot! Also lots of other great info, so for anyone who hasn’t watched it I def recommend!

    I had another questions – I know someone had previously asked about canned tomatoes and Sarah I believe you said that is fine to use, but what about tomato paste? Is this also ok to use?

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    Sharon in Philly Reply:

    Hi Naz, how do I access it? I wasn’t getting up at 2am to watch it but would like to tomorrow night.

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    Naz Reply:

    Hey Sharon,

    I know I crazily stayed up to watch at 2am! But actually had just finished watching a movie so was pretty wide awake lol. Didn’t go for too long but it was good.

    You should be able to access it from here:

    https://www.facebook.com/i.quit.sugar.ebook

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    Sharon in Philly Reply:

    I watched it tonight when I got home, it was good! Can’t believe you stayed up but good on you, I would’ve liked to watch it live but sleep was more important ;-)

    Naz Reply:

    I know! I’m not usually up so late but was wide awake that night/morning! Btw I tried the FAGE yogurt from wholefoods, it was interesting a different taste to what I’m used to but probably because it has a lot less sugar in it than the other brands…I just wish it came in a bigger package haha. I got their 365 brand whole milk yogurt today and while the sugar level on that is still ok to have, it tasted soooo sweet after having the FAGE!

    Sharon Reply:

    Glad you tried it, it took a little while for me to get used to initially but it’s all I have now. They only have 500g but the 0% and 2% have 1000g. Don’t know why. It’s at least three breakfasts at the moment so that’s alright.

  • http://www.theclothesmakethegirl.com Melissa “Melicious” Joulwan

    1. This post is such a great resource. Thanks, Sarah, for pulling all of this stuff together. Super helpful to sharing with friends who haven’t made the commitment yet.2

    2. Thank you for the shout out to my Caramelized Coconut Chip recipe. Those little buggers are really good in a pinch, right?!

    YAY for no sugar!

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  • http://activehandsyoga.com/blog Bettina

    Thanks for the elevator pitches! People get quitting sugar, but it’s been hard to explain to people why I’m not eating fruit. I just tell them that I was a sugar addict and must cut it out of my system completely in order to get over its drug-like effects on my body.

    Also, I am getting a little bored without sugar. I’m used to eating for ‘fun’ rather than nutrition. So what’s your version of a sugar-free devil chocolate cake? It’s the psychological craving for a little something extra, something decadent. As much I love hot milk with cocoa and yogurt with almond butter, they just seem so healthy!

    I tried to go in the salty direction like chips, but here they all have sugar.

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  • Rachel

    Missed the webinair, looking forward to watching later on.
    I have a few questions, searching things out and doucle checking that it’s the added sugars number we have to watch in the nutritional panel not the carbohydrates number.
    I also have been thinking of little snacks that are quick and easy for the first couple of weeks, and came up with big dill pickles. The brand I have is made with nothing bad and less than 1g of sugar /100 g.
    I also found a chocolate bar which is only 70% cocoa( I know you rec 80%) but seems on all other accounts good ( it’s early days for us so I am trying to find things for my husband to help)
    Its made by “well…naturally”, 0.2g sugar/100g – no artificial colors, flavours or preservatives and is sweetened with stevia.
    We tried the mint crisp and two squares were enough and didnt seem to set off any cravings. Just wondering if that sounds ok .
    Thanks to everyone sharing

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  • AliE

    Hi Rachel,

    I ate one of these bars the other day as my one & only binge (in 4 weeks!). I thought it was better than a real chocolate bar?? I did notice they contain 6g of erythritol which is a sugar alcohol. I’m unsure whether it’s safe or not. I’d be interested to hear what others think as I do miss chocolate. I’ve tried cacao nibs but they do it for me!

    I am trying to work out whether tapioca (specifically tapioca syrup) contains fructose. It’s in my ‘natural’ soy milk & I am dubious whether it is a fructose source.

    I am loving these forum for support, advice & recipes. Thank you Sarah for making my big transition from a sweet tooth!

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    Rachel Reply:

    Thanks for pointing out erythritol had no idea that was sugar alcohol! How does that fit into the scheme of things?

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    Matt Reply:

    Most (if not all) sugar alcoh’ol’s end in ‘ol’. Xylitol, erythritol etc.. It’s an easy way to remember them.

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    Gabby Reply:

    Hi Rachel,
    I’ve just checked David’s Quit Plan – he has erythritol and xylitol under the ‘Safe Sugar Alcohols’ section and says “…the science that has been done would appear to indicate that erythritol is not going to hurt you the way fructose will, or in any other way (that we currently know of)….there also doesn’t appear to be a whole lot to complain about with xylitol…”

    His (and I guess Sarah’s?) caution is that these products are untested in the long term – we really don’t know if or what the long term side effects will be, so David lists these as a ‘You Decide’ substitute sweetener.

    I personally am happy to use them, but interestingly am finding my need for sweetness gradually diminishing…amazing!!

    PS am gonna go and get me some of that chocolate though…..

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  • Sharon in Philly

    Is cashew nut butter alright? I’ve started making my own almond butter and decide to try cashew this week. I love them on rice crackers as a snack.

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  • Marion

    Hi Guys!

    Not sure if someone has posted this in the past but if you’re interested in reading a preview of David’s books before purchasing to get an idea what they are like there is a preview here:

    Sweet Poison – http://books.google.com.au/books?id=r2gxWGCdzYAC&printsec=frontcover&dq=david+gillespie&hl=en&sa=X&ei=EX4nT9SoEq-emQWLiezWAw&ved=0CEIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=david%20gillespie&f=false

    Sweet Poison Quit Plan – http://books.google.com.au/books?id=nEEddyfAgFoC&printsec=frontcover&dq=david+gillespie&hl=en&sa=X&ei=EX4nT9SoEq-emQWLiezWAw&ved=0CE4Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=david%20gillespie&f=false

    The full book has much more info so do get it if you’re interested.
    Hope you are all going well sugar free :)

    (Week 5 and I have just stopped having dull headaches… things are looking up!)

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  • Zianna

    Hi Sarah & Peps,
    First Comment for me, brought your e-book and Signed up to FebFast – have to be honest getting drunk tonight LOL but on the road to good health thanks to you. Love your work. I am going gently,slowly with everything but getting there.
    Cheers – literally
    Zianna xxx

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  • sarah

    one piece of fruit a day is fine, a banana is even fine – it has so many health benefits that override the sugar content, plus it gives you a lot of energy = what more could you want from a piece of fruit? I eat 1-2 pieces of fruit most days in the mornings by itself and go sugar free the rest of the day, but this is just me :P

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  • Courtney

    Hi Sarah,
    Firstly thank you for your easy to follow ebook guide, the timing over Xmas and NY was perfect. I am a total sugar addict, leading up to IQS I was eating at least a chocolate bar a day and sometimes a few ice blocks as well (Calippo lime and pineapple!). I have always eaten like this and never ever been on a diet. But I was sick of the crashes which left me low on energy until the next fix.. I cannot believe I haven’t had any chocolate for over three weeks! On the weekend I had a home made iced coffee with friends, it would have been sad to miss out.. and I found the ice cream so sweet.
    Just wondering how much Avocado it is ok to eat in a day? I find they ripen so quickly with the heat in Melbourne and it tempts me to eat the whole thing to stop it from going bad.
    Feeling good so far and have even lost a few kg’s and my belly which was larger than I would like, has noticeably reduced!
    Thanks so much for the inspiration and great tips
    Courtney xx

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  • Lucy

    Hi Sarah,

    I’ve been sugar free (properly) for about a month now and dabbled in it for about 3 months prior to that.

    I am doing fine but the only problem is I am training for a half marathon. I am not into Powerade or any sugary drinks like that but a lot of commentary on running training recommends eating high sugar/carb foods that can be digested quickly and easily by the body, instead of things that taken slower. Can you recommend non-sugar foods to eat that would be suitable to refuel and/or eat prior to a big running session?

    Thanks! x

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  • http://www.matildaraynolds.com Matilda

    Webinar – FAT LOSS. Thank you Sarah for touching on this – I was fairly healthy before going sugar free and though I lost fluid I am yet to lose a substantial/ any amount of weight loss. I am also an elite Triathlete so I have a higher amount of acidity and toxins caused by a lot of exercise. I really need to drop weight for competition, but am going to keep at it as I think I just need to continue to train my body to burn Fat rather than sugar and carbs. I’m 80% off grains and no sugar – loving filling Nori seaweed paper with salad and some pumpkin for energy.
    This week I have also replaced my breakfasts with coconut or almond milk smoothie’s or a vegtable juice… stay tuned.
    Out of frustration I feel off the ban wagon during Christmas, so retraining the body at the moment.

    Do you think there is any possibility of not eating enough and having your body store fat?

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  • Julia

    Hi Sarah,
    I’m confused about coconut. I’ve been on the FODMAP diet recently, which involves cutting out fructose, and it’s made a huge difference. But all the research around FODMAPs (coming mostly out of Monash Uni), my dietitian, and a number of FODMAP websites all list coconut (milk, cream, flesh) as being on the ‘no’ list as it contains high fructose and not enough glucose to counteract. But you say it has no fructose? Can you clarify what your source is for that?
    I’d dearly love to be able to re-introduce coconut, but have tried a couple of times with bad results…
    Thanks

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  • erica

    Hi Sarah,

    I’m about to quit sugar starting next week but I’m specifically doing it because I want to cure my allergies. I’ve heard there’s a link between candida and parasites feeding on sugar in your system and producing all kinds of inflammatory illnesses including allergies (and possibly hashimotos?). Just wondering if a) you had any thoughts on the link between candida and inflammation and b) if quitting sugar affected your auto-immune disease at all.

    Cheers,
    Erica

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  • Amy

    Sarah, I’m confused about Agave Nectar. You’ve pumped it up as a great alternative to sugar, but other sources say it has even MORE fructose than high-fructose corn syrup (see http://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/diet-tips/7-healthy-ingredients-you-should-never-eat ) … Response? What’s the next-best thing?

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    Naz Reply:

    Actually I asked Sarah the same question a while back and no she doesn’t condone using it and told me to stay away from it.

    Also she posted this: http://www.sarahwilson.com.au/2010/07/tuesday-eats-the-deal-with-agave-plus-the-sweetener-you-should-be-using/

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    Amy Reply:

    You’re right – thanks!

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    Naz Reply:

    No worries :)

  • sy

    Hi Sarah,
    thanks for all the helpful tips! I am planning to start IQS and tried a “warm up” last week and gosh, i am appalled reading the labels. Anyway, I’m nursing my little girl now, and am wondering if you’d still encourage me to try this program, since there is the whole detox = release of toxins in the milk possibility.
    Also, on a separate topic, did you learn all this stuff in IIN? I am thinking of enrolling in the iIN program, but am uncertain whether all these good eating tips, like those you’ve talked about in your blog, are covered superficially or in depth in the course. Thanks!

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  • Sharon in Philly

    Im finding that I am fuller longer but still trying to consume the same amount as before I started. I think it’s generally the dairy, not always though. I suppose I’m at the point mentioned in the webinar of trying to work out exactly how much I need and stopping before I eat too much.

    I am enjoying trying new things with this, at home generally I’m boring for dinner it’s either steamed veggies with some cottage cheese or an omelette, its quick and easy. Now, I’m trying some different things which is great.

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    Naz Reply:

    I feel the same as you re dairy, I’m trying to be conscious of my appetite control as Sarah mentioned in the webinar.

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  • Naz

    I was just wondering are all types of sushi out of the question? What about things like sashimi?

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  • Merelyn

    I would love to understand why coconut sugar is high fructose, but coconut water and flour are ok? I am so confused by this! I’m a busy working Mum so might not listen to your webinar, but would love to read about it – late at night – on your blog! Thanks!

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  • Hannah

    Hi Sarah and friends,

    I was wondering what brand and type of butter you use or recommend (eg. for cooking, spreading on toast, etc). The best I’ve found in supermarkets is a block of organic butter but am not sure if this is the good sort and not hydrogenated etc?

    Thanks :)

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  • MirandaBB

    Like other readers I’d like more clarity on various coconut products. I have Fructose Malabsorption and so have left coconut milk and cream on the shelf as I was advised they are high fructose.
    I do have coconut oil and coconut water. But what about coconut flour, dried coconut (dessicated, flakes, shavings) or raw coconut flesh?
    It’s just a bit confusing. I understand that for those of us on the extreme sensitivy fructose scale (ie. with malabsorption issues) we may have to stay clear of certain coconut products and for others it’s not an issue. But a wrap up would be mighty helpful.

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