sugar as toxic as booze and fags? my thoughts…

Posted on February 3rd, 2012

You might have followed all the chatter yesterday – sugar as toxic as alcohol…should be banned…oh, hang on, no, it’s harmless. Etc. Etc. Wendy Harmer buzzed and asked me to provide this comment for TheHoopla. I’d spent the day chatting about it today on radio (and I think I shocked a few jocks into putting down their Boost).

Thought you might like to read my thoughts…

It’s a year to the week that I quit sugar.

And because I’m about to bang on about the need for more transparency in this world, some disclosure: I wrote an ebook about it. So it could be said I have a vested interest in this topic.

Anyone who’s quit sugar would know what I mean when I say that the most challenging-slash-intriguing part of quitting is The Resistance. People get affronted. Angry.

It’s funny. If I told people I no longer ate frozen peas, no-one would care. I wouldn’t get the outrage. The anger.

But sugar? Well…

Earlier today it was revealed a team of scientists from the University of California has called for sugar to be treated as a poison, in much the same ways as alcohol and nicotine. They’ve suggested sugar, too, be taxed heavily and come with warnings, better labelling and education campaigns.

In an article published in science journal Nature they argued sugar isn’t just a bunch of naughty, empty calories. It’s making us fat and killing us. Sugary food, they say, is responsible for 35 million annual deaths worldwide.

They point out that, at the levels consumed in the West, sugar alters metabolism, raises blood pressure, disrupts hormone signalling and causes significant damage to the liver that is still not fully understood, leading to heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

And boy has it brought on The Resistance. Today I’ve watched online as nutrition experts around the world railed against the idea.

But why? I mean. Why?!

Surely none of them think sugar is good for us? Or would disagree with the claim that we’re consuming too much of it? Why not push for better labelling?

As one of the article’s authors said, “We’re not talking prohibition. We’re not advocating a major imposition of the Government into people’s lives. We’re talking about gentle ways to make sugar consumption slightly less convenient, thereby moving people away from the concentrated dose.”

Some of these experts are arguing sugar is entirely avoidable. No it’s not!

Have you been to a supermarket or food court lately? Sugar’s in everything, and insidiously so. It’s so well hidden it shocks when I tell people that barbecue sauce is 50 percent sugar, that pasta sauces can contain more sugar than chocolate topping.

That low-fat tub of yoghurt with “no added sugar” walloped on the front? It contains six teaspoons of the stuff.

A 350ml juice can be festooned with “no added sugar” labels. But if you know how to read the label with the small writing on the back you learn this: it contains 10 teaspoons of sugar, as much as a can of Coke.

I’ve heard this one, too: but sugar is natural! To which, I say: so is arsenic and petroleum.

But we’re meant to eat it… we need it… it’s dangerous to cut it out! Actually, no. Sugar didn’t exist when we evolved as humans and so we don’t have the metabolism to deal with it. When we eat it, our body freaks and turns it immediately to fat, thus wreaking metabolic havoc.

Plus it’s the only foodstuff to which we do not have a corresponding hormone that recognises it in our bodies (more proof we weren’t designed to eat it). If our bodies don’t recognise it, we have no “sugar off switch”. Ergo, we keep eating it. And eating it.

Moderation is key, say others. Impossible in the case of sugar. Two major studies have shown it’s as addictive as cocaine. And, as I say, we binge on it. Me, I can’t eat just one TimTam. You?

But warnings? Really? I’d say sugar needs them more than any other toxin on the planet.

I was talking to David Gillespie, author of Sweet Poison about this last night. He made this stellar point: we know when we’re drinking booze or smoking nicotine; they’re not hidden. With sugar you never know when you’re eating it.

But there’s no science to back all this baloney up! Really?

I should point out the team behind the report includes Professors Robert Lustig, a highly regarded endocrinologist and arguably the world’s leading expert in childhood obesity and whose work I’ve followed for several years. His lecture “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” has developed a cult-like following on YouTube. (Brace yourself – it groans with scientific proof. For a more digestible overview check out New York Times science writer Gary Taubes’ essay Is Sugar Toxic).

Lustig knows The Resistance all too well and has been working for years now to gather conclusive proof to the claims published today.

But the more interesting question here is, why would anyone resist the article’s suggestions? I’m not going to wade too far into the trenches. Frankly, I don’t have a big enough bank balance to defend myself.

But I do advise anyone interested in the war going on to Google some of these resisters.

I dunno. I find it interesting. Some, I’ve discovered, represent food advisory bodies that are funded – wait for it – by global companies that peddle junk food and soft drink. I’ve encountered others who have, say, a range of low GI products that they sell. Fructose (the toxic component of sugar) is low GI (as well as toxic). As Gillespie points out, the best way to lower the GI of something (and thus be eligble for the faddish low GI tag) is to whack in a whole lot fructose. Case in point: Nutella is low GI.

Surprised? Sadly I’m not. We live, after all, in a world where the heart foundation “tick” can be bought for $300,000.

I’m glad this debate has emerged again today. It can get us all talking and doubting.

And looking about. And noticing how odd it is that while we all eat more low-fat products than ever before, and join more gyms, we’re only getting fatter and sicker. And perhaps noting that it’s at a rate proportional to the increase in our sugar consumption.

But, of course, take what I say with care. My interests are vested.

What do you reckon??

Related Posts with Thumbnails
  • Naz

    I’m glad this issue is being bought to the forefront and there is a discussion going on. I’ve been sugar free for 5 weeks now and have already started to feel the effects of being on a sugar free diet. How people can say we NEED sugar is beyond me, uhhh no no one is going to die if they don’t eat sugar but a lot of people are certainly getting sick from eating it. I’m not sure how the whole taxing sugar thing is going to work though…will they be focusing just on the obvious stuff like soft drinks and junk food, or will they also be looking at hidden sugars in sauces etc?

    In any case I think the more people who come out and talk about the dangers of sugar the more people will be forced to listen and take a look.

    [Reply]

  • http://resugardebate Sue

    I wonder if the start of the corn subsidies in the U.S has created this explosion in consumption of sugar. Michael Pollan’s book was a real eye opener to me and shows how our food supply can be manipulated.

    [Reply]

  • Emma

    I’m not a big drinker so this year for febfast for my second year, I took the plunge and gave up coffee and sugar. On only day three, it’s been confronting to explain to friends and family. My Dad especially who seemed legitimately miffed I’d give up the morning juice.

    I think it’s wonderful people are starting to talk about it. It’s a topic that should not be so taboo, as you said, it’s in -everything-.

    The hardest part is not to preach… As they were cutting (yet another) cake at work yesterday I needed to bite my tongue as to why I wasn’t indulging. I think that will. E the hardest part, having all this knowledge and realising not everyone want to hear it.

    [Reply]

    Nic Reply:

    I agree about the cake at work. We have it at my work too. I work in a team of 8 women and none of them really want to hear about it. The eye rolling is quite loud when I say little snippets here and there. I have stopped saying anything anymore.

    And yes I too found it hard not to preach….have to hold myself back sometimes.

    [Reply]

    Anna Reply:

    Emma – I totally agree with you!! I find myself telling people about it all the time, and just find myself trying to justify myself! Now I’ve just given up and sit in the background with a party pie rather than a piece of cake when it comes to the odd office indulgence time!!

    [Reply]

    Bettina Reply:

    I get that too!

    And since I’m vegetarian and an active CSA member, I’m already on seen as the preachy hippie.

    So I just mentioned once at work that for New Year’s, I was quitting sugar but have not peeped a word about it since when the chocolates and cookies are passed around.

    [Reply]

    Malia Marcell Reply:

    I am so so so lucky to work for a large company that doesn’t allow shared treats in the office. They provide healthy lunches, veggies around 2:30 everyday and lite breakfasts. I wish more companies would follow suite.

    [Reply]

  • Di

    am happy that is becoming an issue so things CAN change, this was the first article I ever read about sugar, boy did it wake me up. http://www.thedoctorwithin.com/sugar/sugar-the-sweet-thief-of-life/

    [Reply]

    Cathy F Reply:

    Fascinating and insightful article – thanks Di!

    [Reply]

  • http://selfprofessedproductobsessed.wordpress.com Malia

    So passionate about this. LOVE LOVE LOVE this, it gives me so many more arguments and knowledge! Keep em coming!

    [Reply]

  • sam

    Hi Sarah, you say in this post that two major studies have shown that sugar is as addictive as cocaine. I was wondering what those studies are, I’d like to read them.
    I’ve already read some of the articles you point to and got quite a fright as a self-confessed chocoholic!
    I’ve been making my way through the weeks of the ebook, with a lapse yesterday that left me unable to sleep and woke up with a foul tasting mouth! Ha gross.
    Loving your inspiration, thanks!

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Sam this is the link to the study http://www.jneurosci.org/content/31/35/12593.short unfortunately though it is not available for free you can only read the abstract.

    [Reply]

    Eugene Reply:

    Jan, have you pasted the right link? I’ve just read the abstract of “Enhanced Sucrose and Cocaine Self-Administration and Cue-Induced Drug Seeking after Loss of VGLUT2 in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons in Mice” and it is not at all claiming that “sugar” is as addictive as cocaine. The article isn’t even about how addictive sugar is compared with cocaine. It’s about scientists messing around with the brains of genetically engineered mice and seeing what deleting a whole gene does to them..

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Whoops sorry Eugene I will try to find it, I don’t think I kept the references for my article and was just trying to find it quickly, I will see if I can find the references again.

  • http://www.earthbirtheyond@blogspot.com melanie robinson

    Sarah, I am a Naturopath. I follow your blog. And I just wanted to say that this is a FANTASTIC article on SUGAR. Too often I come across the same silly arguments regarding sugar consumption. Sugar offers NO nutrient benefit, is harmful, and addictive. We could all follow your lead and live a happier and healthier life without it! Well Done!

    [Reply]

  • http://headplanthealth.com Catie

    Punchy response Sarah! Nice.

    Listening to a podcast of Chris Kresser’s the other day, I was intrigued to hear the ‘science’ behind food manufacturing and how foodstuffs are engineered to be hugely palatable and rewarding. Addictive, even. They have researchers and scientists dedicated to creating the most obscene, taste-bud-tittilating junk imaginable! This kind of manipulation of such a basic sense – taste – is a hideous example of our over-riding pursuit of profit. Harnessing the weakness of our fellow human buddies and exploiting it – as you say, in ways that are insidious, under-the-radar. Ouch, we’ve really messed up!

    Let’s hope all this debate draws media/popular attention. With your help, I think it will! x

    [Reply]

    Bettina Reply:

    If you have time, could you please post a link to the podcast? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Catie Reply:

    Sure:
    http://chriskresser.com/why-its-so-hard-to-lose-weight-and-keep-it-off
    His blog is a healthy GOLDMINE!

    [Reply]

  • http://prettygeeky.net/ Bec

    So glad you’re still championing this issue. I have reduced my sugar intake, but I’m not quite where I want to be…. yet!

    Reversing over 20 years of using sugar as a crutch will be a lengthy process for me.

    [Reply]

  • Dani

    I’ve been off the white stuff (sugar) for about 5 weeks, feel so great. Had a relapse this afternoon…its amazing how tired I feel right now and so sluggish, I could just fall asleep and its only 2 pm here in Oregon. Instead of beating myself up over it I am going to make sure I remember this awful feeling I am currently suffering from and move forward. Hopefully having a mental note of how bad it really does make me feel will keep me from making that choice again.

    The last few weeks have been amazing though, I feel pumped up all day, my runs feel strong and my workouts feel amazing, just feeling good inside and out. Besides this very moment when I just wanna curl up in a ball…blah.

    [Reply]

  • Ian

    Really good post Sarah. It’s great to see that in the last year, the sugar debate has become so topical. And well done noting your vested interest in the debate. Ian

    [Reply]

  • sabina
  • Jacqui

    Thanks again for the inspiration Sarah! I’m on week 1 of quitting sugar and was quite shocked when i started reading labels carefully – sugar is in EVERYTHING! I will be sharing this article with all those in my life who doubted and resisted my decision to quit. Cheers!

    [Reply]

  • Kath

    I’m not a great sugar fan – it has never agreed with me, sweet stuff makes me moody. I think I would have been diagnosed as bi polar in my 20s if i hadn’t recognised what my diet was doing to me, and learned how to change it. ( I’m now mostly vegan, and pay a lot of attention to my protein intake).

    So I’m really sympathetic to the anti-sugar arguments. But I do cringe a bit when I read the analogies to ‘addiction’. The war on drugs ( with addiction as the bogeyman) has been an unmitigated disaster in most parts of the world. People self-medicate for a reason – you can’t rip the crutch away until they have the strength to stand up without it.

    Sarah, I think one of the strengths of your writing is you promote building up strength and well being in a general sense, not just detoxing the ‘bad’ substance.

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Hi Kath
    Sugar is actually more addictive than cocaine (through experiments done with mice) and it is addictive because it has an opioid effect on the brain in the same way as nicotine. Fructose is the only sugar that stimulates this response because it causes a spike in cortisol, so we don’t become addicted because of the taste as such it is the chemical reaction that makes us want more and more.

    [Reply]

    Kath Reply:

    Hi Jan,

    I understand the arguments re chemical responses, & i don’t want to take the thread off topic, I just am concerned about the social baggage attached to the notion of addiction. There’s a great book by an academic named Helen Keane called ‘what’s wrong with addiction?’ that investigates the field of addiction studies, and looks at the multiple ways that body chemistry is interpreted at different times. Lots of extracts & reviews to be found if you google.

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Thanks for that Kath I will look up that info and see if I can get the book – I didn’t think about social baggage attached to the notion of addiction.

    Anthony Reply:

    I once gave a lift to a guy that was hitching, he told me that he was a reformed junkie. He went on and told me that cigarettes were harder to kick than cocaine, partly because they were so readily available. I thought about what that guy was saying, I hate cigarettes and would love to see them banned. On the same note we live in a world that craves freedom and freedom of choice, and to ban something like cigarettes, sugar is just not going to happen in this world. However, the way the government is taxing cigarettes along with strict packaging, labelling guidelines and education appears to be effective to some degree, and there is no reason why this strategy should not be applied to other nasty addictive substances such as sugar.

    [Reply]

    ms jane Reply:

    I have a friend who had been a heroin user for 12 years. He quit smack. Then he quit cigarettes. And how did he do this? He started drinking coca cola. Eventually he quit coke too and now just uses coffee!

    Alexandra Reply:

    That’s actually quite common ms jane – D&A inpatient wards and methadone clinics are filled with people who have swapped heroin for another stimulant. Coca Cola, cigarettes, and coffee with an insane amount of sugar seem to be the most popular. Not great but probably better than heroin, though some here may well disagree!

  • Kath

    Whoops, should have read before I posted. Strength is obviously my big word of the day!

    [Reply]

  • Jasmine

    The most frightening thing about the whole “sugar push” and the resistance to he truth is how much it’s forced on children. Adults can easily make their own choices, but for children it’s much harder. I hope that with scientific articles combined with people such as you, Sarah, promoting the truth, that more people’s attitudes will change toward sugar. I’ve always tried to provide my children with the most nutritious food, but there are always relatives & friends saying “all in moderation… a little sugar won’t hurt… You can’t deprive them…” The “depriving” comment bugs me the most – I didn’t realise that providing nutrient dense food amounted to deprivation! It’s hard as a parent to make good choices for myself and my children when those close to me get hostile about my choice to eliminate sugar from our diet. I’m grateful that my children’s school doesn’t have a canteen, so that’s one battle I’m not confronted with, yet. I’ve only just discovered your blog, as well as a few others about traditional food & cooking. I realise I have so much to learn about healthy food.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Welcome! I agree with the kids thing. I don’t have kids, but I can imagine it must be so difficult to “police”.

    [Reply]

    ssisme Reply:

    So hard to police. I was committed to keeping my children sugar free (fruit excepted) for the first two years of eating, only to discover my mum was giving them violet crumbles and tim tams all along. And when the birthday parties begin… I’d go so far as to say it is impossible to keep kids sugar free without avoiding all interaction with family, friends and society!

    [Reply]

    Jasmine Reply:

    It is really hard to police. And of course sometimes you have to pick your battles when it comes to family. As much as I’d like my kids’ diet totally sugar free, it’s not entirely possible with current attitudes and differing opinions toward fat, sugar, healthy eating etc. I’m grateful that we don’t have any major allergies, so we’re all relatively healthy and hardly ever get sick. However I do have small patches of psoriasis that come and go and my 8yr old and I both suffer hay fever at times. I figure we benefit from the healthy diet we have at home and school, so the times sugar is pushed on us, while frustrating, is only a drop n the ocean compared with our healthy food. At the moment it’s the best I can do. Hopefully more doctors and other scientists keep researching and writing papers on the truth and attitudes start to change. It will take time though with so much resistance and ignorance. A lot of parents that I know rely so heavily on prepackaged food to fill lunch boxes, it will take something huge to change their reliance on convenience rather than health. I’m currently studying to be a home ec teacher so I’ll be making a note of the articles mentioned here and in the recent news articles on the topic so I can look them up when I go back to Uni next month. I could go on and on, but have ranted enough lol!

    Vikki K Reply:

    I am so sick of being called a food ‘Nazi’. And I hate seeing parents grinning at their babies getting their first ‘crack’ in a gooey birthday cake for their 1st birthday. I hope I am saving my children from the addiction that brought me and all my siblings to post-natal depression, migraines and various other ailments. And maybe by saying ‘no’ at birthday parties, morning teas and desserts I can show that there is another way… like Jasmine says – they are not deprived!

    [Reply]

    Naz Reply:

    Jasmine, I don’t have children but I understand what you’re saying. I’m 30 years old and the only person who knows I’m sugar free is my husband since we obviously live together and can’t hide it from him, but I can just imagine telling my mum or even my mum-in-law and them rolling their eyes at me. And if I tried to explain to my mum why I wasn’t eating fruit for 8 weeks she would think I’d lost my mind! Luckily for me I live o/s so don’t have to deal with family pressure! All the kids in my family and the one’s in my husbands are growing up much the same way we did, with treats being given in the form of sweets etc.

    In fact the other day my husband’s nephews were telling us all about how they went to the movies as a treat and got to eat a whole bunch of sugar laden foods.

    Also, husband and I were discussing children the other week and I told him that I was against our kids eating things like McDonalds even if it was for a ‘treat’, I said to him you and I don’t touch the stuff so why should our children. I’ve seen his mum taking his nephews there once or twice but that’s something I’m adamant about, even though I’m sure I’ll get slack for it if we do have kids. Hopefully by then attitudes will have changed. I can’t just pinpoint his family as my own sister takes her kids to macdonalds every now and then.

    Of course I don’t expect to cut all sugar from their diet, I think that would be too hard unless there’s a change in the way society deals with this. But I can’t imagine myself denying my kids birthday cakes. I guess if I do have kids I would just try my hardest to fill them with nutritious, fresh foods when they are under my care and hope that other people in my family would do the same.

    [Reply]

    Han Reply:

    Denying kids isnt always the right thing to do either. I grew up in a very hippy family, mostly self sustaining through our own produce, no tv, solar power, 3 hours drive from the nearest McDonalds etc, and guess what? As soon as i got the chance, me and my friends wouold go NUTS at any junk food we could get our hands on, worse then the kids who had had it readily available growing up. We knew it was junk that was bad for us, but did we care? Hells no.
    Personally i think people need to encouraged to follow more of a middle road. Want your 3 year old to have a birthday cake? Go for it, just make a homemade one so you know whats in it. Its not the end of the world if your kids have McDonalds once every 6 months as a very special treat. If you do everyday things like make more foods from scratch, grow some of your own salads and herbs. Then these things can counter balance some of the more unhealthy choices your kids are going to make.
    I totally agree that sugar is very very bad for us, but I think especially when it comes to kids everything in moderation is key.

    [Reply]

    Naz Reply:

    I have to agree with you Han,

    As much as I’d like to think that I can control what my kids in the future will eat I have to also be realistic about it. Like you said either extreme is not good and unfortunately you can’t be in control of everything. I guess my parents really tried with the whole balancing thing with us, we ate home-cooked meals most of the time and had our treats here and there. I think teaching your kids about fresh foods and cooking etc helps, even though my mum would cook for us she never really involved us in the process and once I left home I think that really affected the way I ate.

    While I was at uni I lived alone for the most part and relied on fast foods etc…it wasn’t until I decided to start cooking for myself that I really made an effort with the food I was eating.

    It’s a nice idea to think that in the future these things won’t be a problem but as long as these types of food are out there then yes moderation is key.

    Vikki K Reply:

    Moderation is not the key. Just as I would not hand my kids a cigarette as a ‘treat on their birthday’, I will not let them eat poison. Why is our whole society geared towards sugar as a reward, cake to celebrate your birthday, McDonalds (??? Why not just eat raw sewage?) as a ‘treat’? I agree that educating the kids is important, and involving them in the process is important. My kids know why they are so healthy and energetic, (and have perfect teeth), and they enjoy eating wholesome foods (even some that are designated as ‘treats’). They will need to be equipped with knowledge and good habits to be able to survive the onslaught from media, the ignorant, and well-meaning moderationists as they become more independent.

    Queenie Reply:

    I agree. I grew up in a hippy environment too, and had the same attitude to junk food. Just deal with what happens at home and don’t be too restrictive.last night we went out to a friends place for dinner. My daughter was given both ice-cream and watermelon. The ice-cream melted in the bowl and she asked me if she had to eat it because she was too full of watermelon.
    Trust your kids, don’t deny them but lead by example. You’ll stay happy, avoid fights, and they may surprise you with their choices. Just get all the sugar out of your own house.

    GiGi Reply:

    If only that was the way it was. I agree with your point, but very few kids have McDonald’s twice a year – more like twice a week. In the US there are people who eat every meal in McDonald’s. I think if you can live by the 90/10 percent – or even 99/1 percent – rule, then you’ll do OK. The problem is that it seems to be the other way around for a lot of kids – 10% good food/90% junk!

    ali Reply:

    Hi Han,
    I do agree with you. I wasn’t bought up by ‘hippies’ but my parents were sugar free and extremely health conscious. I still remember the first time I was with a friend who had lollies and my mum wasn’t around. I shoved 4 pieces of bubble gum in my mouth then and there hahaha! I must admit being raised on healthy food has made it easier as an adult to resist sugar, and I naturally prefer fresh plant based diet. But being told I couldn’t have sugar as a child only made me binge when I had the chance. Tricky one.

  • http://econest.blogspot.com Maria Hannaford

    Oh isn’t it ridiculous! Please anyone who doubts whether sugar really can have these harmful effects, go to http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/, search for ‘fructose AND triglycerides’, and see for yourself. Pubmed is a database of peer-reviewed scientific research articles. There IS research showing that fructose raises blood fat levels and cholesterol etc. The science IS there.

    I’m with you Sarah, dietitians and nutritionists have been banging on about reducing sugar consumption for so long, and now they’re saying it’s not that big a deal? Iffy stuff going on.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    I LOVE It when a reader posts a link! Thanks Maria, and I agree – why are nutritionists getting cold feet!?

    [Reply]

    Lydia Reply:

    As a nutritionist I would like to add a little balance into the discussion. Eat less sugar has long been a message promoted and it still is. But when you encounter the zealotry of the anti-sugar crew its a natural reaction to ask a few questions. The nature article did state that small amounts of sugar are not dangerous so when individuals decide to completely give up sugar they are entitled to their choices but not necessarily backed up by science. I congratulate anyone who makes healthy choices for their lifestyle and personally, I strive to eat a really natural unprocessed diet.
    Nutrition as a science is a long long way off having all the answers and there have been major 100% turn arounds in my lifetime and there are probably lots more to come. There remains alot we do not know so to be so righteous about this one compound may be a tad unsound. Please don’t take this as a criticism, I love your blog, I’m just trying to explain why messages in the media are diluted. And, very often you meet people who try to do everything right but still get sick. It then sets them up to feel like a failure. Health is a very complicated, multi-dimensional thing.

    [Reply]

  • Karen

    As well as emphasizing the negatives of sugar, I think we need much greater emphasis on the tangible benefits of quitting – both short and long term. Including those that appeal to vanity like younger looking /glowing skin and easy weight loss :) Scaring people by discussng the dangers will only go so far in encouraging behaviour change and may fuel ‘the resistance’.

    [Reply]

  • http://adamcordner.com Adam Cordner

    How good do those doughnuts look!!

    I’m with you though, The Resistance is tough but so was the Death Star.

    [Reply]

    GiGi Reply:

    Actually, I can remember what a donut tasted like and it would be too sickly sweet now! YUCK………

    [Reply]

  • Lucy Cotter

    I joined the sugar-free mob about 10 months ago and my life has changed immeasurably for the better. It was subtle at first, but now people comment on how I look so well, leaner, clear-complexioned… And my immune system is much stronger. I used to get every virus going around. I could go on and on, but mainly I want to congratulate you, Sarah, on writing your e book and for really sticking with the argument depite the resistance. You are making a real difference. I wouldn’t have read David Gillespie’s books and taken this path without your blog and all your valuable information. I can’t thank you enough. I used to think giving up smoking was the best thing I had ever done for my health, but I now believe quitting sugar is as important, if not more important for my long-term health. And my husband and children are also benefitting. I work at a hospital and see the results of poor lifestyle every day – so much heart disease, cancer and Diabetes etc. It is really frightening. Please keep getting the message out there!

    [Reply]

    Meg Reply:

    I’ve been off sugar for about a month with the hope of improving my immune system so this is great to hear!

    [Reply]

    amy Reply:

    Going of sugar will indeed boost your immunity. It negatively effects our body in so many ways, check out this article by Dr Mercola the 76 dangers of sugar articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/04/20/sugar-dangers.aspx and this study which showed sugars ability to suppress immune function http://www.ajcn.org/content/26/11/1180.abstract.

    [Reply]

    Eugene Reply:

    The 76 dangers of sugar article also says “it isn’t that fructose itself is bad—it is the MASSIVE DOSES you’re exposed to that make it dangerous.”

    And interestingly, the article about immune function notes that starch didn’t have the immune-lowering effect that they found for the refined sugars.

  • Amy

    Love Love Love your work Sarah. x

    [Reply]

  • http://fiftytwo.biz Katie

    “Sugar didn’t exist when we evolved as humans”

    Not entirely true. REFINED sugar didn’t for sure. But there are natural sugars in many of the foods we have evloved eating – fruits and vegetables.

    I’m all for reducing the added EVERYTHING in our food – sugar, salt, preservatives.

    In fact, once you learn to cook from scratch you avoid many of the problems this debate centres around, with exception, things like soy sauce, fish sauce, etc. and then it’s up to each of us to make an informed and conscious decision whether or not to use it and consume it.

    Unfortunately my guess is that only a minority of the population are even thinking about and discussing this issue..

    [Reply]

  • Donna

    Great piece Sarah. I first heard of the benefits of not eating sugar on Twitter last October and was advised to read SWEET POISON – Quit Plan by David Gillespie’s, which I devoured. Then discovered your EBook which reinforced and provided extra information. Have quit sugar and actually found it relatively easy. Have discovered so many delicious foods I can eat. Never felt and looked better! Recently discovered Robert Lustig’s video. I’m trying to control what food is purchased in my household and teach my family, so that husband and teen girls can embrace a fructose free diet and it is working slowly. Teaching people how to read labels is so important. It’s so frustrating the resistance, disbelievers, mockery …it’s like I’m crazy or something and I get told “everything in moderation”. well that maybe correct for some foods and lifestyles and perhaps they think having only 2 squares of chocolate their lowfat foods is OK. I’m an I Quit sugar ambassador now for life and will not stop espousing the benefits AND educating people, whether they like it or not.

    [Reply]

  • Lise

    Thank you Sarah. As a naturopath, I’m very grateful for your voice, bringing this sort of information to the masses.

    [Reply]

  • merran

    I have been reducing my sugar intake for some weeks now. It was never high but I have reduced sugar consumed in muesli, yoghurt and fruit. I had lunch out yesterday, consisting of quiches with relish, salad with some sort of honey dressing and all tasted quite sweet. It left me with a horrible taste in my mouth and a headache all afternoon. Looking at the meal you would think it really healthy..will just go back to my packed lunches!!!

    [Reply]

  • http://eatingplansforweightloss.info jan

    I love that there are forums like this Sarah where we can spread the word! I saw David Gillespie interviewed yesterday morning on Sunrise and there is an article in the Courier Mail today, so I hope they keep up the momentum and the push.

    I have had some comments on my blog and from others I email in the US that they have a big ad campaign about high fructose corn syrup and how natural it is (although I don’t know how anything refined, heated and chemically treated can be regarded as natural). What they don’t put in the ads is because it is so much cheaper than cane sugar it is used in so many processed foods and people who eat them are just overloading their systems with a poison that they cannot cope with.

    [Reply]

  • Kristina

    This is all very truthful but a few things you might what to consider changing.
    YOU need to specify that the fructose that you are referring to is the one derived from cane sugar and is not the one naturally occuring in fruits, berries, vegetables and honey.

    It’s important when you post articles like this online that you also reference your sources. You have obviously read the articles and we all know they exist.

    [Reply]

    Nic Reply:

    Kristina, the “naturally occurring” fructose is just as harmful in concentrated doses ie fruit juice, so there really is no difference.

    [Reply]

    Nic Reply:

    Kristina,

    All fructose no matter what form is toxic. Whether it be in fruit, vegetables, honey.

    Obviously, eating a piece of fruit/vegetable over drinking a glass of juice is better for you, but only in the sense of you getting the added fibre contents from eating the whole fruit/vegetable. Adults should limit themselves to two pieces of fruit per day and children just one.

    Have a read of David Gillespie’s Sweet Poison – Quit Plan book. It’s very good and easy to read.

    [Reply]

    ms jane Reply:

    I think Sarah is just trying to get people to focus on the obvious fructose culprits. If you have fructose intolerance (like I do) you are well aware of the the fructose levels in veggies, wheat, honey etc. And really that subject is altogether another whole e-book! There’s an idea!

    [Reply]

  • Mia Bluegirl

    Yay Sarah!!!

    Unfortunately without sugar most people (and children) would realise that most cereal grains taste like cardboard and there goes our breakfast industry. Which is why I can’t see anything positive coming from this for a long time. However it’s awesome that credible people are pushing this in the right direction.

    I’m not a big fan of banning things, like solariums and nicotine and alcohol and tobacco. People should be able to make their own choices. But they should also be aware of the risks, and aware of the exposure – we’d all be up in arms if they were sneaking alcohol or tobacco into kids’ snacks! So why does sugar get the green light?

    Nice post! Love it.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Ta Mia! xx

    [Reply]

  • beth

    I saw the reports yesterday and was actually thrilled mainstream media were discussing it again. It needs to be talked about so that we all become more aware.

    I have seen naturopaths for my chronic disease since I was 19 y-o. They all told me I should cut out fruit, which at the time was very hard because berries were always my favourite. But, I was able to go cold turkey and quit them because I wanted to minimise some of my symptoms and cutting out fruit is “simple” because you are told when something has fruit in it or you know to steer clear of fruit platters. Simple.

    But they would also ask that I cut out sugar. Which at the time, I found very confusing because I’ve never drunk soft drinks or eaten much chocolate etc. So, I thought I was doing fine.

    It wasn’t until a naturopath three years ago told me I had to check the labels of sauces and juices etc and make sure it was less than 10g per 100g per serve for it to be “ok” to consume. Even then, only at a minimum.

    This opened my eyes a little more to hidden sugars and made me do my own research. Which might have even been how I came across your website in more recent times. And it has actually been through your blog that I’ve truly understood hidden sugar and how I can make better decisions in the foods I am choosing.

    I think it’s so important that consumers become more aware and that packaging lables are more transparent so that we can all make clear decisions about what we are consuming. It can be so overwhelming going to shops and trying to buy “healthy” food.

    We are all just trying to do our best and feed our bodies as best we can, but with so much confusion, misinformation and companies focussing on profits, it’s a challenging landscape to navigate!

    Fructose and sugars now give me a headache whithin an hour or so of consuming them. It’s enough of a side effect for me to say no 99% of the time to sweet things.

    Thanks for continuing the discussions and for offering us information in a easy to understand way. In the end, if people are informed and confident they know what they’re dealing with, then they have the tools to make their own decisions and choices.

    [Reply]

    Tilly Reply:

    Hi Beth
    Have you cut out fruit completely? Do you still have a reaction if the fruit is cooked ie: stewed rhubarb and apple (no sugar, of course)? Have you also cut out high-fructose vegetables – tomatoes, asparagus, sweet potato – or is it just fruit? I’m doing well being sugar-free; and I’m lactose intolerant and gluten-sensitive as well. It leaves me with a fairly bland diet so cutting out all fruit would just make it even blander, but I think I’ll have to go there.
    I certainly feel 100% better on a paleo-type diet (can’t quite cut gluten-free bread out). I guess it’s just a matter of taking the focus off food and onto feeling good.
    Cheers

    [Reply]

  • Olivia

    I have been sugar free for 6 weeks, and recently found out I may be hypoglycaemic! The reason it never came up before? It was being covered by my sugar intake, which was making me sicker every day!!! Thank you Sarah, with your book, “Suicide by Sugar” and “Why we get fat: and what to do about it”…I finally understand how to get my health back. May I also add that I have lost 4kg in 6 weeks with no effort and little exercise aside from yoga and walking…and I am never hungry or craving anything..I am slowly getting my life back.

    [Reply]

  • Queenie

    I want to add my thanks, Sarah. I started with you, back in February 2011, and I sort of did it just to see what happened. I didn’t think I’d stick with it.

    But what happened was so enormous that sugar-free I’d now a permanent part of my life. Gone are my mood swings, my inability to sleep for more than 3 hours at a stretch, my nagging hunger, my mid-morning and afternoon slumps. Gone is my very short temper and my constantly itchy and dry skin. I look younger. I’ve lost a bit of weight but more interestingly, my shape has changed, I’ve got my small waist back and my skin seems to be tighter. My cystic acne, with me since adolescence, is slowly clearing.

    But it’s the mood swings i could kiss you for! That I now have an even temper thoughout the day ad when the day is done, I sleep. After a lifetime of mood disorders and clinical depression, I don’t care what objectors say, it works so well for me I feel like a whole new person.

    And after the initial weeks, it was so, so easy and still is.who cares about sugar when you can eat cheese. And cream. And lamb fat ( yes I’m a complete omnivore!)

    And lastly, if there was any more proof needed, may I offer my 7 year old. I never pushed my choices on her, although there is now no sugar in the house and I have explained why. She still gets icecreams and stuff sometimes, especially from her grandma. But she now says to me that some things are too sweet, she thinks olives make a great snack, and she threw out some of the stuff she was given for Halloween because she said it tasted gross (god bless people who still give sweets to kids as presents, can you please stop! Try plain popcorn or something!).
    Many thanks Sarah, I never would have done this or read what I have without you. It’s huge. Keep going, despite what people say. Sugar is a drug and we are better off without it.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.sugar-free-nickirs.com Nic

    Sarah,

    Loved this blog. Keep it up. The message is slowly getting out there. I especially identified with the anger reactions when you tell people. I’ve learnt not to say anything anymore, it’s not worth the reactions. I only inject small comments here and there now. Plus I keep putting up the info on facebook and slowly more and more of my family and friends are listening.

    Take care,

    Nic

    [Reply]

  • Peter

    Did it ever occur to you that the title of this blog entry (the cavalier use of the word “fag”) is insensitive if not outright bigoted?

    [Reply]

    Daryl Reply:

    The word ‘fags’ used in the title is an Australian colloquialism for cigarettes, please explain how it is insensitive or bigoted? Oh, and get a life instead of looking for things to get offended about.

    [Reply]

  • lionheartedgirl

    For me, one of the most enjoyable parts of playing with no sugar is how simple it’s making my life! I am one of those people who can get a little overwhelmed when it comes to too much choice. By reducing the sorts of food I am ‘allowed’ to eat, I am finding myself moving effortlessly throughout the day without having to waste time tossing up options. And I also love that when I eat something it isn’t followed by the feelings of shame and guilt and regret that always seem to surface after I eat sugar.

    Thank you Sarah for sharing your ideas with us, and also to everyone else who contributes to this blog…I am always finding little nuggets of gold in the comments left here…

    [Reply]

  • http://holistichealingandcfs.wordpress.com/ amy

    Thanks for a post that speaks so much truth. Fantastic. Oh the politics of health and nutrition. Maybe if the DAA’s major partners weren’t kellogs and nestle and there weren’t conflicts of interest responses may be different. Thanks again!

    [Reply]

  • picardie.girl

    I think the resistance is largely based on the following:

    – sugar is seen as ‘fun’
    – ergo people who are against sugar are seen as ‘anti-fun’ and spoiling things for everyone else. Celebrating without cake?! Impossible.
    – most of us are addicted and don’t want to hear the truth because it is inconvenient
    – there is so much ‘no’ in this world; we are constantly being told ‘this is bad for you, don’t do that, you shouldn’t…’ etc. And so I think we get a bit sick of it – this is yet another thing to add to the ‘don’t’ list. Many people start to wonder, ‘what’s left? What the hell CAN I eat?’. And so they bow out from the discussion altogether.

    I know I am particularly guilty of the last one. A bit more focus on the positive would be lovely; more ‘this is what you can eat’, more ‘this is great for us’, and most importantly, making the good choices easier, would do a world of good. This is where change happens; this is where the uncomfortable discussions about sugar and the inconvenient eye-opening can get us. If talking more widely about sugar and the dangers of its consumption can actually instigate some changes which make it easier to eat well and to live healthily, I’m all for it. Turning it into another thing to beat ourselves up about, I am not a fan about.

    I for one am pleased this has come to a head; sugar’s been on my mind for a while and now more people are joining the debate maybe I won’t seem such a loon to be considering leaving it behind.

    Thanks Sarah for a gentle and interesting post.

    [Reply]

    Alexandra Reply:

    Those points are so true in my experience. It baffles me when people here are accused of depriving their children by not giving then packets of sultanas but that really is how it is seen. I would never have cut down on sugar so much without Sarah’s posts, even though the first time I read them I was desperate for them not to be true!

    [Reply]

    picardie.girl Reply:

    In all honesty, I still am desperate for them not to be true! Work in progress here.

    [Reply]

    Bettina Reply:

    Yes!

    I am actually one of those people who think sugar is FUN! And even though I’m now on week 5 of quitting sugar and have consciously decide to lapse 3 times (one of which was tasting for my wedding cake), I am starting to feel a little too goody-goody.

    How can we make food fun without sugar?? I know this is more about mindset than recipes…

    [Reply]

    Naz Reply:

    For me personally since starting this program I have become more consciously aware of what I’m putting into my body. What I mean by that is, I know really think about what I’m eating and how it makes me feel.

    Before this program I would just eat and not really think about what it was that I was eating, but now I think about what ingredients I’m going to put together to make me feel better and to nourish me. And once I eat I take a moment to think about how that food has just made me feel.

    I think we just associate sugar as something fun because that’s how most of us grew up….that’s how I grew up, treats were given to us in the form of going to McDonalds or stopping off after school to get a milk shake or having elaborate cakes for our birthdays.

    Whenever something celebratory was going on there was sugar involved. It’s hard to change a mindset after so many years of growing up that way but why can’t we decide to make other food fun?

    Why does it have to be all about the sugar?

    [Reply]

  • Pete J

    Hey there,

    Thanks for contributing to the confusion and veil of ‘mis-truth’ that’s out there. Once again another perfectly natural substance becomes the scape goat to perform the old switcheroo tactic, you may have seen it, where a magician shows you one hand and does something else (that you should be paying attention to) in the other.

    Forget sugar, or fructose or whatever other crap that is being spinned. If it’s naturally occurring, i.e. grown in the dirt, it’s fine and your body will be able to process it, period. What people need to see is the stuff that is really doing the damage is all the E numbers that are being thrown into food willy nilly.

    Food is literally laced with ‘sweetners’ (artificial sugar), emulsifiers, colours, flavours, enhancers, E201, E220, etc, etc. Check out the food additives guide, half this stuff is banned is most countries who care about their citizens. Not in the US or Australia. These are the real killers, not simple cane sugar, give me a break, seriously cane sugar!?!?

    Tell me what human gene processes E220? Which is in pretty much all soft drinks as a preservative and is proven to inhibit the absorption of vitamin B which is essential for the processing of you guessed it, SUGAR!!!!

    FACT, the truth is always simple. FACT, if you don’t understand it, or it doesn’t sound right, it probably is complete BS, like most of this article. Wake up people, if someone is selling an E-Book or making money, they have self serving interests.

    [Reply]

    Jean Reply:

    There’s that resistance again – well go ahead, Pete. Eat cane sugar. Even better, why not grow some in your backyard, so you can have the freshest, most organic cane sugar possible – surely that’s the healthiest thing to do. Seeing as you’re not into artifical additives.

    Good luck getting it out of the cane and into your sugar bowl, without the massive expensive refining machinery and chemicals needed for the job http://youtu.be/vCLEYmugfDw

    “Naturally occuring, grown in the dirt”. Give ME a break. 😉

    [Reply]

    Pete J Reply:

    Fair call about the refinement of sugar, i’ll pay that. However i’m pretty sure there are bigger fish to fry than sugar. Write an article about E numbers. See how long the FDA allows you to keep it up on your website, before they point out you are not able to provide medical advice.

    Look up these E numbers on Wikipedia (not the best source of info, but you’ll get the picture).
    E102, E171, E133, E129, E330, E220
    These are in a jar of jelly beans on my desk given as a freebee in the Xmas Hamper, soon to be in the bin. As a preview E102 (Tartrazine) is found in Soaps, cosmetics, shampoos and other hair products, moisturizers, crayons, hand sanitizer, nail polish, inks for writing instruments and stamp dyes, oh and YOUR FOOD!

    [Reply]

    Adam Cordner Reply:

    Tabacco is natural right?

    [Reply]

    Pete J Reply:

    Yep tobacco is natural, been around for centuries and smoked all over the world. Go to Japan and see the 100 year old men smoking it. Mind you they are just smoking tobacco and not the modern day variety which has rat poison, kitchen cleaner etc etc. Again common sense.

    When a smoker breathes on you what do you smell? The smoke or the cleaning products that are lining their throats. Go ahead, try it one day, ask a smoker to not smoke for 1 hour then breathe on you and see what you smell.

    Again simple common sense truth here, no tricks, see with your own eyes. Make up your own mind with your own judgement.

    [Reply]

    Olivia Reply:

    Yeah Pete – Sarah wrote the ebook solely to make money! She doesn’t care about her readers, she is completely selfish! NOT! Funny how she doesn’t charge for all the FREE information in her blog. You are not TRICKED into buying her ebook, but I tell you all of us are being tricked into buying sugar – its so well hidden – and you cannot deny that!

    Do your own research and be objective about it, I am sure you will come up with similar conclusions.

    I agree with you on the preservatives argument, but, you need to read more on the topic before you start drawing conclusions. Read the FREE stuff first and see how you go.

    Talk about vested interest – what is your take on the food manufacturing companies? Do you think they want to take the sugar out? Of course not! It’s a great preservative, we are all addicted to its taste and without it they wouldn’t make their profits both taste and self life would reduce substantially.

    You obviously don’t have a lot of health problems – also consider everyone is different and for a lot of people sugar is lethal!

    Good luck to you…

    [Reply]

    Pete J Reply:

    Yeah you’d be right in saying i don’t have any health problems, but that’s not by mistake or accident.

    As far as i’m concerned sugar is my friend, my body tells me when i need it and so i go and get some. Last night i went for a bike ride, ran out of fuel, nearly passed out, my body told me i needed sugar pronto, so i got some Jelly beans, ate them and hey presto, not even 5 minutes later i am doing 40kph like it’s nothing and got a fast time. If anyone tries to tell me that we can’t process sugar, or that we don’t need it, bollocks. I guess if you don’t exercise and sit on your arse, then yeah, eat in moderation, otherwise go for a run and enjoy an ice cream after.

    [Reply]

    Happily Fructose Free! Reply:

    Pete J:

    If you disagree – just don’t read the blog, go elsewhere and quit your complaining and commenting on something that is quite obviously helping a lot of people. If you don’t know Sarah personally then it is not your place to comment on whether she is pushing this theory just cos she’s written an e-book or not. If you are so concerned about E numbers, then why don’t you go and write you own blog, write your own e-book and get that message out there. Don’t use Sarah’s blog and considerable effort that she’s put into experimenting for herself with reducing/eliminating fructose to be your podium – go get your own.

    In response to nearly passing out and eating jelly beans. Yeah, of course they would have helped you – the fact that you then went 40kph and “got a fast time” is neither here nor there to those of us who are fructose free. Who cares if Jelly beans got you to that state. If you had planned ahead of time from your exercise and eaten the right amount of good carbs, fats, protein & veggies you wouldn’t have nearly passed out on your ride in the first place.

    Also, no one said we can’t process sugar. Those of us who are fructose free just agree we would prefer not to eat sugar and not to have our bodies process sugar. Maybe you should give it a try and you’d actually probably find that you’re a nice person and less inclined to comment on something you don’t understand.

    Olivia Reply:

    Happily Fructose free’s comment is awesome! Great Advice!!!

    jan Reply:

    Hell yes we need sugar. What do you think the cavemen used to rip out when they had been walking for miles, chasing their prey, killing it and lugging it home. Yes, you guessed it jelly beans – full of additives jelly beans – they have been around for the history of man for sure.

    Nutrition by Nature Reply:

    Pete, just wondering… Most of those jellybeans are pure glucose jellybeans and don’t contain fructose. Sarah’s main dig, and most people here (mine too), is at fructose. Glucose is less toxic than fructose and all carbohydrates (plus protein and fat in the absence of carbs) are converted to glucose in the body for fuel. I’m sure the glucose jellybeans are horribly processed and I’m not endorsing them, I just wonder what a compared response would be to pure fructose, which is toxic in anything greater than very small amounts.
    A little off the topic, just a thought.

    Gray Reply:

    Pete you say you don’t have any health problems and ‘that’s not by mistake or accident.’ That seems to imply that you think people with health issues have brought them on themselves. That’s a pretty arrogant judgement – many people with chronic health issues are born with them. Others used to be healthy and like you enjoyed strenuous exercise, until illness or an accident intervened. You should thank your lucky stars you are healthy and show a little more empathy towards those who aren’t. And by the way, there is a mushroom that grows in the ACT which if eaten destroys the kidneys. Five people have died from eating by mistake in the past decade. things that grow in the ground can be deadly.

    Alexandra Reply:

    I mean, I’m 99% sure Sarah is not in favour of all the sweeteners, enhancers, emulsifiers etc you mention either.

    [Reply]

    Nic Reply:

    Pete,

    You are so right about the preservatives and additives. Been saying it for years how bad artificial sweetners are for people only to get the same reactions as you are to sugar. And it is so wrong that the US and Australia haven’t banned them. Surely if other countries have banned such substances it’s because they are bad for you not because they want to be a party pooper. I also agree about the tobacco leaves that some people smoke. And it makes me wonder if you wanted to smoke would just smoking tobacco leaves be ok? Instead of the man made cigarettes we have today laced with goodness knows what.

    You may not seem like you have any health problems now but what about in 10yrs time?
    There are a lot of fit skinny people kealing over with heart attacks and heart disease. When was the last time you had a blood test to check your cholesterol levels?

    All you have to do is read up on the damage the fructose does to your body.

    I know we are always getting bombarded with don’t have this and don’t have that but we are being told the wrong things….the reason for this is all to do with a) MONEY and b) Pharmaceutical companies making money off people getting sick and c) MONEY.

    Nic

    [Reply]

    ms jane Reply:

    Yes fructose is natural. This doesn’t mean that it’s good for you! Pete I had to quit my job as I got so sick from fructose malabsorption before finally being diagnosed. Now I don’t eat it at all and am finally healthy and working again. Check your facts. Oh and I also avoid additives. That’s one fact you got correct. Have a great day.

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    “If it’s naturally occurring, i.e. grown in the dirt, it’s fine and your body will be able to process it, period.”

    Not quite. Many species of plants are poisonous if ingested. Digitalis, magnolias, rhododendrons… somebody with a sound knowledge of botany could elaborate further, it’s definitely not my strong suit. Even certain parts of seemingly harmless plants such as those that bear potatoes and rhubarb are toxic to humans.

    Sugar will certainly give you a quick burst of energy, however that doesn’t prove it is healthy for you. Methamthetamines will do the same thing, and so will caffeine. If you are addicted to either of those things you will crave them and feel like your body needs them, this is no indication of the health of that particular substance! Curious also that you had a rant about preservatives and then advocated eating ice cream?

    Agree with you on the E numbers, although I really do not see what relevance it has to this topic. I am sure there are many other forums out there that discuss that in length.

    [Reply]

    picardie.girl Reply:

    You’re right, Mia, mushrooms especially are often deadly and they are very much naturally occurring.

    [Reply]

  • Jean

    I’d like to add my thanks to you, Sarah, for this and all the other posts related to sugar and how bad it actually is for you.

    On the subject of children and sugar, I would like to make this comment: I WISH my parents hadn’t given it to me. In copious amounts. Not just on my birthday and on everyone else’s birthday, and Christmas, and Easter, etc.. but pretty much ALL THE TIME. I drank cordial because water was too bland. I had several teaspoons of milo in milk every day. Couldn’t eat sausages without loads of tomato sauce. I was encouraged to bake cakes and cookies – because isn’t it great when kids get into cooking? I used to eat that batter. There was always soft drink in the fridge and there was always a “fun size” bag of chocolates (mars, snickers, whatever) in the cupboard. It was always available. So when I grew up and left home, I continued eating that way because it was “normal”. I had no idea that sugar was so bad. Wasn’t FAT supposed to be the real bad guy? I distinctly remember saying to myself, oooh, don’t get the choccy because it’s very fatty – have some fat-free lollies instead. I’d only have the choccy when I was being “bad”. In my family, it was ok to be bad, once in a while. No big deal.

    If the information about the deleterious effects of sugar had been made public like the info about smoking and alcohol, maybe my parents would have realised what they were doing, and maybe they would have been a little stricter about what I was scoffing, and maybe I wouldn’t be suffering now with obesity. Maybe I wouldn’t have lost a tooth and had several others filled with (hey here’s another toxin for ya) mercury, which then had to be removed and re-filled at great expense and pain. Maybe I wouldn’t have lost my 20s and 30s to debilitating bouts of depression.

    Yeah, yeah, I know – major cop out to blame your parents for everything. I’m not blaming them. They had no idea either! My mum has since expressed extreme regret for the past and the way she fed the family. But it’s all good – we have the info now, so we can turn it around!

    With the help of David Gillespie’s wonderful books, and Sarah’s blog to back it up, and several other sources that I found myself (once I knew what to look for!!!) I’m proud to say that I am no longer addicted to sugar, and my health is slowly improving.

    I hope to become healthy enough to have a baby one day soon, as hubby is keen… but I tell you one thing for sure… my child will never be allowed to eat sugar. And I won’t think of it as depriving my child – it will be PROTECTING my child. And anyone who has a go at me about it is going to get an earful of my story.

    [Reply]

    Olivia Reply:

    Great post, and I agree, I consider it protecting my daughter now! I no longer feel like I am depriving her and I am so grateful for this knowledge and will continue to share it with anyone that will listen!

    Good luck to you and I hope it all works out!

    [Reply]

  • Suzy

    Would love to buy Sarah’s ebook but I fail to see why paypal (with whom I don’t have and don’t want an account) needs to know my postal address or my residential address for a bloody ebook :-(
    Why can’t I pay by direct debit :-(

    [Reply]

    amyer Reply:

    I think you can if you send an email to Sarah’s assistant, Jo.
    Might be wrong! 😉

    [Reply]

  • http://naturopathfionahogan.blogspot.com/ fiona hogan

    Loving the anti-sugar crusade. Well done. I’m also a Naturopath and have been harping on about this for a long time. Sugar is lethal and difficult to avoid, go Sarah and David Gillespi you guys are beginning to educate the masses.
    Here’s to healthier lives and less dis-ease. Bring on healthy fats.

    [Reply]

  • Tiff

    Am on the 8 week program…week 4…. and just one little thing that keeps popping up in my head… If from an evolutionary perspective we’re not designed to eat fruit… or only a handful of berries a day…are you saying that throughout time, in places where fruit is abundant it’s wrong for people to have been eating it? Who is it for, then? Just animals that can digest it? I’m asking this seriously! ‘Scuse my ignorance. I mean, petroleum and arsenic – to my knowledge – are not delicious. But fruit seems like natures little treat. No?

    [Reply]

    Meg Reply:

    To be honest, I’ve been wondering about this too…is it because we first evolved in non-tropical areas or something?

    [Reply]

    Trish Reply:

    I agree wholeheartedly,Tiff.
    I’ve been sugar-free for over 18 months now, lost 8 kilos which have not come back, no matter what I eat (as long as it is not sugar-laden) BUT I have 3 to 4 serves of fruit per day!
    Fruit is not the enemy: processed fructose is. As David Gillespie explains so clearly in his wonderful books, fruit is something that people have always eaten in season. Processed crap is not.
    I’ve found that if I stay away from the obvious sources of sugar(biscuits, cake, etc) and keep my sugar intake to fruit only, I feel great.
    The main thing you need to do is give sugar up completely (except for fruit) for at least 2 weeks. After that, you lose your taste for it (I promise!) and as long as you don’t ‘just have a taste’ of your favourite sugar-laden treat, you won’t miss it.
    I had always been addicted to Christmas cake and Christmas pudding but I can assure you that I could happily watch people eat both and not feel the need to join them. I had definitely lost the sense memory of both foods, and so did not feel remotely deprived. Eating an apple was just as enjoyable. Trust me, it works.

    [Reply]

    Queenie Reply:

    From a purely personal experience, I think it has a lot to do with climate. I lived in a part of the Middle East where dates were once a diet staPle (and still are) every time I go back, and I have been back since becoming sugar free, I revert to eating the local diet which is basically rice, pulses, meat, salad and dates, and no ill effects. Same when I go to Thailand, I eat a lot of fresh fruit. Often, also when traveling overseas, you get confronted with choices such as: flavored yoghurt or sweetened white bread or dates, be ause that’s all that’s available in the petrol station 200 km from anywhere in the desert. I’m not a crank! I choose the dates . But back in southern Australia in winter? No way!

    [Reply]

    eve Reply:

    I think if you wade back through some of Sarah’s posts, she is advocating giving up fruit as well.

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    eve – Sarah only advocates giving up fruit for the 8 weeks that you are quitting sugar and then you introduce fruit back into your diet.

  • Alexandra

    Oh and unrelated but I thought of you Sarah when I read this interesting piece in the smh about chronic strenous excercise: http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/fitness-fascination-stretches-the-truth-20120202-1qvii.html

    [Reply]

  • Hayley

    I have been on the sugar free bandwagon for about 5-6weeks. I have one or two lapses in the time, but the thing is, I haven’t felt any different as a result. After a lapse I still sleep the same, have the same amount of energy and don’t notice any other ill effects as a result. It makes it hard for me to stay off sugar when I can’t experiencethe negative consequences. I wonder if anyone else’s experiences are similar…
    Hayley

    [Reply]

    Tiff Reply:

    Feeling the same!
    Wrote about it in another post, thinking maybe having two small babies was stealing any extra energy i might otherwise be experiencing without my noticing – but i’m feeling kinda just the same, too. Am gonna stick out the 8 weeks anyway. I am enjoying catching myself up on all the times i just reach for a sugary snack instead of something more healthy. That’s good to be aware of. But i feel like i need some other light at the end of the tunnel too, because i keep looking at my grandparents and other oldies who’ve just eaten the way they always have their whole life, and are old and…well fine! I dunno. I’m glad i’m doing this experiment – not fussed about losing weight, but just wish i was experiencing what others are. I guess it just affects everyone’s body differently.

    [Reply]

    Naz Reply:

    I hear you both Hayley and Tiff.

    I haven’t been having much of the results that other people are writing about on here, but did you watch the webinar and what Sarah said about that?

    For me I think it might come down to the fact that I wasn’t eating a whole lot of sugar or processed foods before this. I had already cut down my fruit intake by a lot (i.e just eating berries, kiwi fruit or bananas), I never touch soft drinks and don’t do condiments like sauces etc either. I hardly ate bread and occasionally I would eat some jam on toast or honey. So I’m thinking maybe that’s why I haven’t had the same symptoms. Also our bodies are different and I will keep going with this program and see how I feel by the end.

    Sarah even said herself in the webinar that she didn’t really loose any weight until after the program so it’s all relative. Even if you’re not feeling any symptoms doesn’t mean something’s not going on in the inside, your body is just adjusting and if at the end of the 8 weeks you think oh well not for me, then so be it.

    But stick it out until then :)

    [Reply]

    eve Reply:

    I am intolerant to wheat, dairy and various additives (I don’t know which ones so generally avoid processed foods). Now I don’t have the best self-control in the world but there have been periods where I have successfully avoided these groups for a few months at a time. I always feel much, MUCH better, (particularly the time I gave up all grains!). Earlier this year, in addition to giving up wheat, dairy and processed foods I also gave up sugar (including fruit) for about 3-4 weeks. Yes, I felt well, but not improved from the previous diets. I guess once you’re not eating wheat, dairy & processed foods, it is very difficult to consume sugar. For me, sugar/fruit was the final straw and made me utterly miserable. So my goal is to now limit wheat & dairy and to eat food as close to it’s natural state as possible. Anything else – for me – is too hard, particularly for any period longer than a few months.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: #IQS – End of week 4 « One Day At A Time…()

  • Eugene

    Maybe resistance is stoked because headlines like “sugar as toxic as booze and fags” and “the toxic truth about sugar” seem to greatly exagerrate things.

    FIrstly, “sugar” refers to a whole class of molecules so those headlines are making a huge claim. On closer inspection, the Nature article by Lustig goes on to define the “sugar” as fructose – so he should have written “the toxic truth about fructose” in his headline!

    Secondly, there’s wide agreement that too much fructose is bad for us – but this post is claiming that “sugar” is bad in any quantity. Pretty much everyone agrees that junk food, soft drinks and those donuts in the photograph are unhealthy. And regarding a whole pack of TimTams, I have easily eaten just one, though I would have prefered to eat half and chuck the other half in the bin :) I may eat a small serving of high-sugar junk food with other people once every couple of months, and I’m not addicted. I wouldn’t want to try cocaine though. Nevertheless, I’m sure that some people actually do have addictions to sugar, and this is indeed a serious and difficult challenge. I really hope they can help themselves, maybe with the aid of Sarah’s advice and some psychological methods.

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    Hi Eugene
    In Dr Lustig’s video of his lecture, Sugar the bitter truth, which Sarah posted in a blog just recently, he does actually say at one point that all sugar is bad for you, although the main focus of his lecture is fructose and more specifically high fructose corn syrup, he definitely includes table sugar in the equation. Natural sugar is half glucose and half fructose, so if you eat enough sugar, you are going to be overloaded with fructose eventually. So Sarah’s title is spot on and doesn’t exaggerate things at all. Particularly when you consider the number of savory foods such as tomato sauce, bbq sauce, baked beans etc that have sugar in them! Our food chain is saturated with sugar and fructose for those who eat a lot of processed foods and drink a lot of soft drink and fruit juices.

    [Reply]

  • Meg

    My family have been following the Weston A Price wellbeing philosophy for 2 + years eating (fresh, unprocessed) nutrient dense foods (via our Naturopath/Herbalist Anthia) and thriving.

    This week I found myself in Emergency (regional base hospital) having surgery on my upset appendics. The staff were lovely but the food choices for poor esp for those recovering from surgery/illness. Way too many packaged foods (desserts heaped with sugar), spreads (inc one with transfat). It was difficult to find a salad, and the gravy covered grey microwaved protein meals were inedible (I accept the difficulties of proving food on mass with limited budgets). I did choose to eat a piece of fruit at each meal though because it was the freshest most nutritional choice that was available.

    The point of my post though was my surprise with the dietitian coming to see me after receiving my food selections. The dietitian wanted to know how long I had been experiencing ‘eating problems’ suggesting I had an eating disorder! And she wasn’t talking about my days in hospital. (Doctors noted my fitness, healthy stats (BP etc) and body weight!

    It is so important Sarah, David, Anthia and many others keep up the good fight on important issue like this. We have got it so wrong and it is making us very unwell in so many ways. Great work Sarah.

    [Reply]

  • Gemma

    A lot of people that I have this discussion with, freak out when I mention that I avoid a lot of fruit. They say how can this be healthy when you’re cutting out fruit! Fruit is a major component of the Food Pyramid. I just think the entire way that we are educated about nutrition is wrong and needs a huge review!

    [Reply]

    Naz Reply:

    Well we don’t need to cut out fruit entirely as David and Sarah have said. Yes for the 8 weeks but after that it is fine to have certain fruits. But I agree I grew up being fed fruit salads nearly everyday, of course I appreciate the fact that my parents weren’t feeding me junk but the stomach aches I used to get after eating a bowl of it was horrible…now I know why!

    [Reply]

    GiGi Reply:

    Up until recently fruit was not in abundance the way it is now – (and often it’s out of season and imported). Back in our primal days we would have been lucky if we came across fruit twice a week. And often not at all. I look at fruit as a sometimes-food. And I feel so much better for it.

    [Reply]

  • Becca

    The cover up is frightening, i am amazed that it has been able to go this far and all to line the pockets of people in high places. I have only been reading up about being sugar free for the past few days, and today is my fist day off it. Its hard to make people open their eyes and realise that sugar is a problem! thanks for helping to open my eyes, i am so excited about being healthy and happy and sugar free!

    [Reply]

  • Emma

    On a No/low sugar diet, is there a maximum amount of sugar we should be eating in a day from non-fructose sources? (dairy products, etc)

    [Reply]

  • prez_vu

    in regards to sugar, you mean refined sugar surely? in regards to your quote in the article

    ” Sugar didn’t exist when we evolved as humans and so we don’t have the metabolism to deal with it.”

    uhmm there is a thing called the pancreas.

    Function

    See also: Endocrine pancreas and Exocrine pancreas
    The pancreas is a dual-function gland, having features of both endocrine and exocrine glands.

    The part of the pancreas with endocrine function is made up of approximately a million[3] cell clusters called islets of Langerhans. Four main cell types exist in the islets. They are relatively difficult to distinguish using standard staining techniques, but they can be classified by their secretion: α cells secrete glucagon (increase glucose in blood), β cells secrete insulin (decrease glucose in blood), δ cells secrete somatostatin (regulates/stops α and β cells), and PP cells secrete pancreatic polypeptide.[4]

    The islets are a compact collection of endocrine cells arranged in clusters and cords and are crisscrossed by a dense network of capillaries. The capillaries of the islets are lined by layers of endocrine cells in direct contact with vessels, and most endocrine cells are in direct contact with blood vessels, either by cytoplasmic processes or by direct apposition. According to the volume The Body, by Alan E. Nourse,[5] the islets are “busily manufacturing their hormone and generally disregarding the pancreatic cells all around them, as though they were located in some completely different part of the body.” The islet of Langerhans plays an imperative role in glucose metabolism and regulation of blood glucose concentration.

    The pancreas as an exocrine gland helps out the digestive system. It secretes pancreatic fluid that contains digestive enzymes that pass to the small intestine. These enzymes help to further break down the carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids (fats) in the chyme.

    In humans, the secretory activity of the pancreas is regulated directly via the effect of hormones in the blood on the islets of Langerhans and indirectly through the effect of the autonomic nervous system on the blood flow.[6]

    Sympathetic (adrenergic)
    α2: decreases secretion from beta cells, increases secretion from alpha cells, β2: increases secretion from beta cells
    Parasympathetic (muscarinic)

    M3: increases stimulation of alpha cells and beta cells[7]

    Insulin peoples! INSULIN!

    [Reply]

    jan Reply:

    prez-vu sugar is sugar whether you consume it as fruit, honey or refined, it is the fructose that is the problem and even cane sugar is 50% fructose. When we were evolving there was very little sugar only honey or natural fruits, which probably weren’t anywhere near as sweet as the fruits cultivated today. Over ripe fruit has more fructose than just ripe fruit as well. Our bodies process any type of fructose in the liver and if the liver is not overloaded, the liver will turn it into glucose for our bodies to use as energy. The point is that we so overload our bodies with sugar and fructose today, so that our liver cannot process it fast enough and it is turned to fat. Also for many of us who are or who have been sugar addicts, once we start it is very difficult to stop!

    Nice info about the pancreas and insulin, but fructose does not generate the insulin response that glucose does which is why it goes straight to the liver for processing. If you eat sugar laden foods – soft drinks, cakes, biscuits, lollies, tomato sauce etc the fructose component is taken straight to the liver.

    [Reply]

    Nic Reply:

    Prez-Vu,

    Yes as you mention it’s glucose that gets metabolised but fructose doesn’t, it goes straight to our liver and gets converted in to fatty cells. Seeing as table sugar (sucrose) is half glucose and half fructose, it’s not good to consume. There is so much about this topic that I could go on forever but I won’t bore you with it all. All the information is out there if you are interested in learning about it.

    Also thank you for the lesson on the pancreas as I didn’t know all that stuff and I’ve learnt something today. :)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.vintagefabrics.com.au Vanessa

    I have been (mostly) on a primal diet for five months now and that involves not eating sugar or faux sugar products. I can’t believe how different my body and mind is…for those who are skeptical, try it for yourselves!

    [Reply]

  • joan l

    I’m convinced after reading this article and the follow-ups suggested from Pubmed, that I should quit sugar. I’m not sure where to start, but I’ll find that out. I’m wondering about the other ‘natural sugars’ , especially lactose. Should I give that up too?

    [Reply]

    Nic Reply:

    Joan,

    Lactose is ok because it’s a form of Galactose and Glucose which is fine for us. The only sugar our bodies can’t metabolise is Fructose. There is a lot of info on how to go about quitting, I read David Gillespie’s Sweet Poison Quit Plan and that was really good. Also on fb there is the Sweet Poison page and Christine Cronau’s page and of course keep following Sarah’s blogs and her book. Good luck and you can do it!

    [Reply]

    Eugene Reply:

    Actually our bodies can metabolise fructose – this webpage has some details – http://themedicalbiochemistrypage.org/non-glucose-sugar-metabolism.html. As you can read there our bodies have specific enzymes (e.g. fructokinase) that process fructose, so we actually did evolve to process and metabolise it. So I think strictly-speaking –

    “Sugar didn’t exist when we evolved as humans and so we don’t have the metabolism to deal with it. When we eat it, our body freaks and turns it immediately to fat, thus wreaking metabolic havoc.”

    – is incorrect. I know that Sarah is not a biochemist, but she’s a journalist..

    I only know the very basics of biochemistry myself, but I think it’s pretty safe to say that our bodies didn’t evolve to handle the huge quantity of fructose that many of us humans now get in processed foods. So the metabolic pathway for fructose exists and works well “as-designed” in most of us, but the body’s regulation of it is not “designed” to keep handling large amounts. I’ve just found this quote in a textbook called “Harper’s Illustrated Biochemistry”:

    “Fructose undergoes more rapid glycolysis in the liver than does glucose, because it bypasses the regulatory step catalyzed by phosphofructokinase. This allows fructose to flood the pathways in the liver, leading to enhanced fatty acid synthesis, increased esterification of fatty acids, and increased VLDL secretion, which may raise serum triacylglycerols and ultimately raise LDL cholesterol concentrations.”

    Even the “The 76 Dangers of Sugar to Your Health” article linked to above (http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/04/20/sugar-dangers.aspx) is writing “It isn’t that fructose itself is bad—it is the MASSIVE DOSES you’re exposed to that make it dangerous.”

    [Reply]

    amy Reply:

    I think Dr Mercola is playing it safe with his statements in contrast to the many startling studies referenced and data displayed in the article. He also recommends for most people 15 grams or less of fructose daily particuarly those with any health issues, particuarly immune and digestive related. 15 grams isn’t very much when you consider the naturally occuring fructose in vegetables eaten daily. For hundreds of thousands of years we only ate fruit as a rare treat and this fruit was no where near as sweet as todays crop.

    Nic Reply:

    Hi Eugene,

    Correct me if I’m wrong but what your saying is we can metabolise fructose but in small doses. Well you’ll be happy to know that David Gillespie recommends that we can have 15gs of fructose a day. Thats equivalent, with a guessimate, to about 2-3pieces of fruit a day. It doesn’t sound like much but I’m certainly not having any problems sticking to it. The problem is these days that pretty much everything that is processed has fructose injected into it especially low fat products. And the advice that we have low fat everything, no saturated fats is utterly neglegent. All these “association/councils” etc. are making us all sicker by advising us to have less fat because our bodies need cholesterol. We need it to build our immune system, we need it to repair our bodies, we need it to help the brain produce serotonin and also cortisol. Our bodies need cholesterol and it’s being blamed for the cause of heart disease for far too long.

    Eugene Reply:

    Hi Nic,

    I get what you mean, but I think the definition of “metabolise” that’s used in science refers to any chemical reaction occuring in living cells that changes one molecule to another. BTW, Wikipedia has a featured article on metabolism. So strictly-speaking our bodies can metabolise even huge quantities of fructose. But the consequences of metabolism aren’t always healthy. For example, the act of metabolism can use up certain molecules before they’re replenished if it goes too quickly (as seems to be the case for lots of fructose). It can also produce an excess of other molecules. If the organism isn’t adapted to handle this disruption of homeostasis, the result may well be unhealthy especially if disruption is severe.

    Ok, 15gs of fructose sounds more reasonable than 0gs. I certainly don’t know enough to comment on the number 15. Effect probably depends if fructose is consumed at once or gradually.. I completely agree that processed food is not good for us for that, and for other reasons. Even the Aussie Dept of Health is discouraging it.

    The fat/cholesterol stuff is certainly controversial and not clear-cut. Basically, the people who advocate reducing saturated fat and controlling LDL consider saturated fat & cholesterol to be like fructose – not inherently toxic but causing trouble in large quantities. Unlike fructose, our bodies do need cholesterol to do heaps of stuff, but our liver can manufacture cholesterol.

  • GiGi

    I’ve been sugar-free for more than 6 months now and I have to say it was one of the easier things that I’ve done. I’m trying to cut back on the amount of (gluten-free) bread that I eat – and that is way harder! But, boy, is it hard around the table – any table; family, work, social get-togethers. Recently, I was offered a Chorizo omelette at a friends house. I can’t think of anything worse – well sugar, I guess – than chorizo. If people knew what went into it! Once you make the decision to try to get it right, I think you come up against so much opposition because people know that what you’re saying is right, but acknowledging it means they would have to do something about the way they eat. Did anyone watch ‘Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead’ during the week? The amount of people who said they would rather eat a bad diet and die young than change the way they eat was staggering.
    I have no answers…………

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: 10am + weekend link love « appelsauce()

  • Cathy F

    Am currently reading SUGAR DREAMS – Waking up to the bitter reality – by nutritionist Monica Colmsjo – http://www.sugardreams.com.au. Monica’s son was an alcoholic who later died and she explains how alcohol is the most refined sugar there is and how her son’s alcoholism/sugar addiction helped contribute to his death and the impact sugar and diet has on all our lives. Absorbing reading, esp given that Australia has massive social alcohol addiction problems – just watch the nightly news!

    [Reply]

  • Jess

    How on earth does one give up sugar ?? after from the vegetables every single thing i looked at in my cupboards and fridge contained sugar in one form or another…. and I thought my family resonably ate healthy :-/ scary!!

    [Reply]

  • http://naturopathfionahogan.blogspot.com/ fiona hogan

    @Jess, my thoughts exactly, sugar is in everything! the pasta sauce, the cereal, the bread, the english muffins, the baked beans, the dips, the mayonnaise, the rice crackers! And the fruit bowl…..
    It is definitely food for thought – trying to avoid sugar is difficult and very challenging. But once you re-calibrate your metabolism by avoiding it as Sarah’s IQS ebook says you will feel a difference and if you don’t your body will.

    [Reply]

  • Jasmine

    Just watching Dr Oz’s show & Dr Lustig is his guest. He’s just been talking about fructose, only briefly, as well as the quality of lots of other foods. Let’s hope these issues stay in the media and attitudes start to change so that we all have more access to high quality, nutritious foods that we and our families deserve.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: what’s with all the gluten intolerances?? let me explain… | Sarah Wilson()

  • Pingback: Another quitting sugar blog « Sugar Sensitive Mama()

  • Keelie

    This is not a new concept. Your book is making waves and that is a good thing. The media have always manipulated the masses. Writing your own material is one way to get the message across. I remember talking about banning cigarettes in nightclubs twenty five years ago (when I was working as a dancer) I got laughed at by management, patrons, staff and friends. Then I heard a lady sued the club I worked in – and won! Now we have great laws against smoking indoors and even on our beaches. Personally, I live my life eating fresh vegetables plus a tiny amount of fruit (two/three pieces a week). I am even eating much less meat. I don’t like people judging me therefore I don’t make a statement about my consumption of sugar, dairy or meat. I fully support you. And yes, The Resisters are my friends, work colleagues and family. I don’t preach to anyone I know because as soon as I have a bit of chocolate they are ready to give me their judgements. Go, You Good Thing! Keep up with your convictions.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: Pick Your Poison – Vegan? Dairy-Free? Sugar-Free? |()

  • Pingback: Pick Your Poison - Vegan? Dairy-Free? Sugar-Free? - Life [Comma] Etc()

  • Pingback: Gary Taubes: we can win the sugar fight » I Quit Sugar()