Are the nutritionists lying to us? (a podcast, plus five *more* copies of Big Fat Lies to giveaway)

Posted on March 7th, 2012

This post has been updated.

Last week I chatted to David Gillespie about some of the food myths he debunks in his new book Big Fat Lies. Today we have a quick chat about why the “lies” continue. I reckon you’ll like this one.

image via Marina Giller

It’s easy to conclude from what David exposes in his book and in the podcast that there is a conspiracy going on. I prefer – and so does David – to be more moderate and get informed as to why the bodgy science got off the ground in the first place. And how it then formed the basis of most nutritional thinking in the Western world – everything from our food pyramid to taglines in infomercials.

It’s almost comical. But understandable. The world wanted answers when rates of heart disease suddenly soared in the 1950s. A President had a heart attack. All that was available at the time was a silly study on rabbits from 30 years earlier that everyone had dismissed at the time as proving nothing of any worth.

But everyone latched on to the faulty science.  The lies kind of domino-ed from there.

David is careful to say “ignorance” and commercial reality is to blame. Perhaps. But a breakfast cereal company selling us sugary flakes with clever marketing is only one part of the problem.

The bigger problem, to my mind, is that some of the peak nutritional bodies here and in other parts of the Western world, and many of the doctors, “experts” and nutritionists who we trust to tell us the truth, are often actively peddling these lies – and in the face of conflicting evidence. What’s more…

Some of the more vocal and influential nutritionists are paid by breakfast cereal companies and the like.

And many of the peak bodies are funded by major soft drink and junk food companies.

I won’t draw conclusions for you. I’m not saying such funding (which is often necessary for some of these organisations to survive) results directly in vested outcomes. But it’s good to know the full picture, right? Sadly, we’re rarely given it.

Anyway. You make up your own mind…

While you’re listening, you may like to check out these links. They highlight the various multinational sugar-based and low-fat companies that fund the major nutritional bodies in Australia and the US. As I say, make up your own mind…

Also, you might also be interested to read this article on how the sugar industry sugar industry muzzles journalists or those who speak out.

And here’s the original column from the Daily Mail on how much sugar there is in breakfast cereals. A quote from the article that I found pertinent: “It would take a very brave government to pick a fight with the corporations that have built such lucrative businesses on the back of our addiction to sugar.”

As I’ve commented before, there’s not going to be a major campaign any time soon to get us off sugar. It’s just not going to happen. We have to take the responsibility on ourselves.

Someone on twitter also sent me this one – a rundown of how PepsiCo do their spin, including this: “Hiring respected public health experts and medical doctors to represent the company, creating an illusion of having a health-oriented mission, instead of being driven by profit.” Sigh…

Oh yes. The book giveaway….

Since so many of you were so excited about David’s new book ‘Big Fat Lies: How the Diet Industry is Making You Sick, Fat & Poor’ last week, I managed to secure another five to giveaway. To be in the running, please post an engaging comment below…

What are your thoughts?

 

 

Related Posts with Thumbnails
  • http://slightlyirritatingandinconvenient.blogspot.com Kristin Overton

    As a registered holistic nutritionist (in Canada) myself, I can definitely tell you that I am not paid off by any sort of organization whether it be one promoting sugary cereal or a raw foods diet. I am very fortunate to (while sticking to some guidelines) be able to promote my own fact based opinions towards clients that I see.

    In Canada, I believe that what you’re saying is applicable to those who complete a degree as a dietician. Their education is built around the Canada food guide (modeled around the US version) and is heavily influenced by industry. These are the people who are employed in nursing homes and hospitals, caring for those who need proper nutrition the most (And we all know what hospital food tastes like… ).

    I wish everyone could see our food system the way that I do and know that the majority of what’s out there and is being promoted to the masses is the wrong stuff. We all need to take it upon ourselves to be able to decipher the wool that’s been pulled over our eyes from the fresh, healthy, real food that IS out there. Each of us make a ton of decisions daily regarding what we choose to put in our mouths to fuel our bodies and our lives. Why not make it worth it?

    [Reply]

    mel Reply:

    i really love the way you have put that ; why not make it worth it. Simple and easy to stick to, cuts through all the crap. thanks I’m taking that with me.

    [Reply]

    AJ Reply:

    HI Kristin, you most certainly are referring to the dieticians, NOT To be confused with nutritionists who’s study curriculum is the complete OPPOSITE in MANY areas surrounding food and diet. Shame on you Sarah as a journalist who does NOT present all the facts and mis-represents 100’000′s of qualified nutritionists around the globe, Id like to see your qualifications in science and nutrition before you go building a blog around health advice you are not qualified to give. go back to fashion, you suit that world better

    [Reply]

    Kate Callaghan Reply:

    I think it is unfair and a HUGE generalisation to say that ALL dietitians are lying and don’t know what they are talking about. It is true that we are still taught to consume the opposite of what is ideal, however, we are also taught to think critically and be able to decipher scientific studies and then make an educated decision on what is best for our clients. SOME of us still remember our biochemistry and physiology and are able to recognise that the current guidelines do not match up with what is best for optimal health, and SOME of us stay up to date with the research and know that what makes sense is a traditional, whole foods diet, not a grain-dominated, fat-free big-industry-promoting diet. Unfortunately, many do not bother to do their own research and instead just follow and promote the guidelines blindly. If you come across such a dietitian or nutritionist, rather than just call them an idiot, perhaps tell them about the great book you just read (e.g. Nora’s Primal Body Primal Mind) and ask for their opinion on it. If they are worth your money, they will read the book, see that there is a lot of science behind it and HOPEFULLY start to come around to the idea that we can live without processed grains (or grains at all, for that matter). There is a lot of influence from government and industry, so the best way to change the thinking of the “experts” is one by one.
    Sarah, a lot of people trust and respect your opinions (including me). It would be really great if you could please acknowledge that not ALL dietitians and nutritionists are out of their mind. There are some of us (although few and far between) who have a firm understanding of what works and what is healthy and who are able to guide and educate others towards optimal health. Thanks!

    [Reply]

  • stacy t

    I don’t know that I have an engaging comment but as someone who recently lost 100lbs+ by cutting processed foods and carbs/sugar out, tracking my calories, carbs and fats and exercising more I am very interested in reading this book.

    [Reply]

  • http://samvidbeauty.com Kourtney L.

    The views and perceptions I grew up knowing about health and wellness are vastly different then what I have educated myself on. Growing up the food pyramid use to be a staple in all my health room classes and in our family steak was a typical weekly meal my mom made.

    A lot of these ideas about health I have accumulated are completely opposite of what true health and wellness are. It is interesting to see how my family reacts to my new decisions about how I eat compared to their traditional eating ways. My diet is a majority of vegetables, legumes and whole grains, and I don’t often eat meat, especially red meat (it kind of grosses me out now).

    A few weeks ago I caught the cold and was sick, for the first time in a very long time, for about a week. My brother’s advice to me was “Well maybe you shouldn’t put all the crap in your body” and “You need to eat some red meat.” I was in awe of his opinions and flabbergasted that someone could think I was putting crap in my body.

    What I ask myself is, when will the larger society understand what health and wellness truly is?

    [Reply]

  • Claire

    I have been gluten free for about three years. After flirting with quitting sugar for a couple of months last year, I have been eating a diet inspired by paleo for the last couple of weeks. A lot has inspired this change, mainly the way grains, legumes and sugar make me feel.

    The effect so far is astounding – my skin has cleared right up (from both eczema and pimples – even my blackheads are gone!) and is now softer than it has ever been, my mood is more even, my head is less foggy and I’ve already dropped 3 kilos!

    I must say though, what really amazes me is my parents attitude to the change. My dad is morbidly obese and my mother is overweight and uncomfortable in her body, so diet is something that is always a hot topic in our house. I recommended that they try eating paleo with me just to see how they feel, no pressure. They said the theory of paleo sounded great and they would try it and see what happened.

    The first day my mum had a piece of toast for breakfast because “The dog expects some of my toast in the morning so I had to eat it.” Dad hoofed down a thick cut sandwich for lunch because “there is no other food in the house”, and mum happily munched away on a plate full of cheese and crackers. FOR A MEAL. I intentionally didn’t put pressure on them, but regardless they kept coming to me with justification of their food choices as though trying to have me absolve their guilt for knowing they weren’t putting in the effort. They kept protesting that they really were trying, but I”m not sure who they were trying to convince – me or themselves.

    I think it’s amazing that my family are are seeing me change in front of them – and quickly – but despite having read the paleo guidelines, logic and benefits they refuse to believe it’s due to my change in diet. Not only have they dropped the ball after a matter of days, they’re now offering left field reasons as to why so much has changed because they can’t believe my wellness is food related. All I can think is that they have spent their whole lives with all this “pro grain pro sugar” propaganda that’s been fed to our “nutritionists” through industry, and it makes me sad that they may never be open to a better way of life because it’s too different for them to be comfortable with. Hell, my mother’s opinion on water as a beverage is that “it’s just to wash with”.

    I wish I could help them see that these things are easy to change – that once you stop eating sugar and grains you don’t FEEL like sugar and grains. Despite using me as evidence – a formerly bad skinned, depressed, chubby, incredibly sweet toothed teenager – they refuse to see what’s in front of them. It’s almost like they’re too scared to break the cycle.

    I just want a better life for them, because they’re both lacking in energy, sluggish, moody and unhappy, and I don’t want them to give up and think it’s too late or it’s not worth changing.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Reply:

    It’s hard isn’t it, my boyfriend is only a little overweight but I worry about his health sometimes. He is so disinterested in what I have to say about diet and the other day for lunch he ate toast, sausages, fried eggs etc and I asked him why he doesn’t butter his toast and he said “because butter is unhealthy”…URGH!

    [Reply]

    Sue Reply:

    Well done. People don’t want to get out of their comfort zones…….until they have no other choice. And they certainly won’t listen to you. Be the change you want to see in your world!

    [Reply]

    Sara Reply:

    Good on you for making such a positive change. My Dad was the same with me. He actually is quite healthy but he suffers from the effects of sugar. He gets horrible migraines from too much sugar but thought his diet was fine. He gave up alcohol 30 years ago and doesn’t eat ‘sweets’ he used to eat loads of fruit – 5 pieces a day easily. He would not believe me that this was the same as eating sugar or ‘sweets’. The idea that fruit is not necessarily healthy in large doses goes against everything he knows and at 73 changing that belief is hard work. He also believed anything in moderation was fine (your parents probably think a sandwich here or there is not big deal at all). I ended up just giving him Sarah’s book to read. That changed his tune. It was like I’d be speaking Chinese to him before and then he turns around and starts telling ME all about sugar. Sometimes it can’t come from family as it falls on deaf ears. Good luck with it!

    [Reply]

    Amanda Parker Reply:

    Fabulous – making a change in your diet, & making a change in how you choose to be you – as the you were brought up to be within & accepting without Q, your family culture. Or the You you create by honouring that which feels right when you ask a Q & get the A ! Then act on it even when its outside of all you’ve known, & you’re on your own Baby!
    All the signs you describe with your skin, weight, mood etc, so many people choose to seek a prescription to “treat ” these signs & avoid even asking beyond a superficial level, “why am I experiencing this?” “what can I do about it?”
    Well done for experimenting, embracing the results and stepping outside of the family culture. I agree, its pretty freaky to see behaviour around you that is transparent for what it is, & the expectation there that you will swallow it!
    Once you’ve stepped away from unhealthy eating habits you can never go back – your taste buds won’t let you ( or the healthy skin, or the clear eyes, or the great energy levels….)

    [Reply]

  • Jennifer G. Miller

    I can’t seem to find in the book in America yet, but it sounds so terrific! It has been such a struggle to convince family members that this low-fat, low cholesterol approach is not healthy! I have such regret on how I ate during my pregnancies. I had gestational diabetes, requiring insulin, and tried to follow the diet they endorsed, since I knew nothing about insulin and how it affects the body. I ate more protein and less carbs than they suggested, but I should have done even less, without any wheat/gluten. I think I would have felt better, and perhaps not even needed the insulin. My cravings would have been much lower without the wheat and sugar.

    [Reply]

  • Sarah

    I have been slowly changing my lifestyle to this way of thinking. My dietitian thinks it’s ridiculous so I don’t bother to ask her about it anymore. She thinks people like David are under-educated and following ‘fads’. I eat organic butter, full cream milk, organic meats and veggies and I feel great. I have been so inspired by all this that I started jogging a few months ago and I cal feel and see the changes slowly taking place. I would love to own his book as an added boost, and If I can’t get a free copy I will eventually buy it (finds are a little tight right now because of uni). I am not overweight but I have always been unfit and not feeling that great, but now I already have better stamina and am feeling amazing.

    [Reply]

  • Farhana

    Have tried on many occasions to get my mother on the right track of eating. Not obese but overweight and has Diabetes Type II. All attempts at motivating her to exercise and eat well failed. However, two weeks ago she was diagnosed with an autoimmune dermatologic disease and this has sparked an interest in her about eating the right things for her autoimmune condition. I’m really hoping that the information from David Gillespie and yourself combined with her newfound self-will is going to be a life changing event.

    [Reply]

  • Kelly

    Kelly had some vege oil
    It made her fat and sick
    she swapped them for some healthy oils
    lost weight and got real fit

    ;) Would love a copy of the book! :)

    Love all the information going around on how to re-educate myself (and family) to eat properly for health! :)

    Keep up the fabulous work!!!! :)

    [Reply]

  • LC

    I am halfway through the “I Quit Sugar” program and am enjoying observing the changes in my mood, appetite and energy levels.
    The change of my choice in breakfast has made the most notable difference. Two years ago I was having sugar coated porridge first thing every morning, which would start a daily rampage where I’d spend the next eight or so hours hungering for the white stuff, trying and failing to avoid a sweet treat at the vending machine during work and snacking before and after dinner. For the last few months I have avoided sugar first thing in the morning more often than not and it makes a noticeable difference in both my cravings and my ability to control them.
    I haven’t had a single piece of chocolate for more than two weeks now – a huge achievement when I was previously consuming it on at least a daily basis and had been doing so for quite a long time. Over the last month I have rarely had sugar cravings – I am no longer focused on when I am going to get my next “hit”. Life is blissful!

    [Reply]

  • http://holistichealingandcfs.wordpress.com/ amy

    It shocked me when I realised conventional dietry advise was driven essentially by money, not by an interest in our health. I don’t think the practitioners are intentionally lying to us (as far as I know, exept possibly when it comes to selling a product they must know is not healthy.) There is something fundamentally wrong with the system which starts with the government and flows down through to high education, media etc. Follow the money I guess.

    [Reply]

  • Natalie

    I think what your saying is a bit dangerous. You, and David Gillespie might be right, I am only studying nutrition and don’t feel qualified to comment either way, but nutritionist do and have helped millions across the world, so I can’t stand in support of calling them liars. I know several nutritionists and none of them are paid to express opinions. Of course it happens, but it’s unfair to say ‘Are nutritionists lying to us’. How about, ‘Are nutritionists in the media lying to us?’.

    Just my opnion.

    [Reply]

    Natalie Reply:

    Ugh, excuse all those typos.

    [Reply]

  • Liz

    This is the exact reason I am so lost right now. I worked my arse off studying this shit at uni and realised this is exactly the opposite of what I want to do for a career. I’m currently weighing up my options on what to do next and working shit jobs in the meantime because I hate my career. Frustrated to say the least! Am finding like minded books and people encouraging, would love to read this one.

    [Reply]

    Kat Reply:

    I’ve been thinking something very similar to what Liz said myself recently. I’m a nurse and every single day I wonder if the information I was taught at uni about diet, lifestyle, medications and so on is truly helpful to the vulnerable, sick people I care for. I always make a point of taking a moment and thinking “would I do XYZ myself?” and if not, why would I recommend a patient do it? I also have a few health problems and the journey I’ve been on for the last 9 years trying to figure it all out has been frustrating and overwhelming at times. I’ve all but given up on trying to find a ‘cure’ through Western medicine/conventional dietetics. The key for me has been seeking out my own knowledge and information.

    [Reply]

    Liz Reply:

    I’m glad to hear I’m not the only one in this boat. I truely resent telling people to do the opposite of what I actually believe, and the way I try to eat myself. Although, I think it’s unfair to blame individual dietitians. If we don’t say these things we are mocked/ridiculed/risk getting the sack. It’s enough to make me want to work in an entirely different industry, I’m just not sure what yet. And I totally agree with you Kat, you have to be the investigator of your own health. This is one thing I encourage my patients to do too.

    [Reply]

    Ele Reply:

    I feel for you both and many others in your position. Do you just stay and put up with it during your study and then try and change things? Or is it too hard being in the minority at the moment? I don’t know the answer.

    I am currently studying clinical research as part of my bachelor degree and I get concerned reading about the process of submitting research articles for publication as they need to go through peer review. So if your peers have set views in any industry it is going to be tough getting your point across if you are in the minority as your article will be rejected.

    Love to hear your views on Liz and Kat’s comments Sarah W. I struggled with this in past roles and got out of them – too hard. Maybe I just wasn’t passionate enough.

  • LaurenMaree

    I have been yo yo dieting for my entire life.
    After a very bad breakup and the loss of my house I moved back in with my parents last year. During this time I was the healthiest and happiest I have ever been because they made everything from scratch.
    Mum has a vegie and herb garden and my dad did the market shopping. I was eating bigger meals and exercising less than usual but because everything I ate was home made and without sugar and with healthy fats, I just glowed and my weight was perfect, as was my fat to muscle ratio.
    Now that I’m back out of home I’m struggling again and desperately wish I was back there. There was no chips, cakes, lollies, muesli bars, cereals etc in their house, just love and a love of good food.
    I’ve just started to realise this and am making a conscious effort to eat only wholefoods and cook foods myself and in four weeks I’ve noticed a very big difference. Dad was dead against low fat products because he wanted full fat and that’s what we ate, me begrudgingly but now I see the benefits.
    I’ve thrown out all the fat free shakes and cereals, bars and milks and just doing what my mum does, eat with love.

    [Reply]

  • http://laniquehome.etsy.com Nic*

    Second try round for Davids new book.
    Would appreciate to be chosen!

    As for every body else posting here:
    It is so great to read your opinions and experience…I was wondering if there is a forum to exchange more about this. Would love to ask you guys some questions too…not just Sarah (LOL sorry Sarah)

    X
    Nic*

    [Reply]

  • Candice

    2 months after quitting sugar but upping the amount of natural fat I am eating I have lost 4.4kgs and feel and look better than I have in years. Now how could that happen if fat is the big bad thing it has been made out to be?

    [Reply]

  • Cheryl

    The bigger problem is nutritionists, it is the associations they have to belong to to achieve certification and initials after their names. Every single one of the organizations listed above takes “contributions” or “grant money” for studies. When they say things like soda is alright to drink as is artificial sweetener, we have a huge problem and yes, those are big fat lies. The nutritionist may not be paid to express their opinions, but their professional associations are and I can also guarantee that their comments on certain truths are curated by those same associations.

    [Reply]

  • Michaela

    I would love to get a giveaway copy of this book as a gift to my mum to help encourage and inform her about ways she can help keep getting healthier. She’s already started and is doing awesome, but there’s so much rubbish information out there it takes a lot of work and energy to do the best for your body, which can be disheartening when you’re trying to do the right thing but the information you’re fed is so wrong!

    Keep up the good work and thanks for having a single location (blog) to come to with links and articles about the RIGHT thing for our bodies! :)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.changeonewoman.com Tarryne

    The problem as David so diplomatically puts it, is ignorance. People are hesitant to actually go out and pay for a nutritionist or dieticians advice, or buy a decent book that is about nutrition not “diet”. Naturally there are professionals who will allow what they know to be right, to be overridden by a pay check. (like nutritionists featured in cokes “aspartame is perfectly safe” campaigns), but the bigger issue is that until people begin viewing everything they see with a healthy dose of scepticism and accepting that marketing is not designed with your wellbeing in mind, this will always be an issue. People need to take their health into their own hands and read, question and research rather than accept whatever they are told. That includes marketing aimed at doctors and other health professionals who don’t have a great deal of training in this field.

    As my own doctor likes to say “who paid for the advert?”

    [Reply]

    Sophia Reply:

    I’m currently living in a French host family for a year as an exchange student, and it’s been quite a shock because in the US I live on a farm and eat lovely fresh food all the time and my host family in France eats a lot of sugar and artificial foods.

    Example: During my first week in France, my host sister who is a 22 year old medical student explained to me that the white pellet she put in her morning coffee was “like sugar but with no calories” (later read the label and turns out it’s aspartame). She added, apparently as a little point of interest, “It’s illegal in Great Britain. I don’t know why though…” and proceeded to drop the little calorie free poison pellet into her coffee.

    Yep, I think ignorance may be a little bit of a problem here…Makes me wonder what they’re teaching her in medical school…

    [Reply]

  • http://karina028.blogspot.com Karina

    I have started reading David’s Sweet Poison Quit book… while I am definitely not ‘SUGAR FREE’ I can understand how it is like a drug. Just this weekend I ‘indulged’ a bit after my healthy eating and daily workouts – and my little indulgence turned into a weekend full or sugary/fatty food. I realise this is beacuse once you have a bit – you want MORE.
    I had, for years, suffered with “IBS” – however in the last few months since eating mostly unprocessed foods – I would go as far to say I don’t even (and probably never did) have IBS – the only time I can an upset stomach is after eating junk.
    I still have soooo much to learn (after being told that things like Diet Coke and Low Fat options are OK, that everthing in moderation is ok – even if my idea of moderation is once a day – and that making something at home is good for me – even if i’m using half a cup of sugar in one dish!)

    [Reply]

  • Chaos

    At start of year I was 91kg (I’m 189cm) I regulary excerised before (and still do) and simply by:

    - Eating two eggs (no bread) in morning instead of ceral (I ate Sultana Bran or Corn flakes previously). Bacon added on weekends.
    - Cutting sugar from coffee and generally avoiding sugar unless its a special occasion. I have full fat milk.
    - Cutting rice in half when eating Asian. Normally would clean plate.
    - Limiting bread to once a week.
    - Alcohol to two days only a week. Was probably on 4 days before.
    - Eat plenty of protein and veg. I eat the pork crackling. I eat the crispy bacon rind. I don’t cut out fat from meats.

    Have dropped 5 kg’s. Now 86 kg. Only change was diet. Feel great.

    [Reply]

  • Naomi

    Fat schmat…. I’ve lived the last ten+ years of my life without buttering my bread, avoiding cheese, having low fat milk and low fat yoghurt. I’ve used minimal or no oil. I’ve exercised until the low fat cows come home. Yet I haven’t got any thinner or any fitter. 4 months into quitting sugar, I’ve lost 4kgs and have more energy than I can ever remembering having. True story, no big fat lie.

    [Reply]

    Liesl Reply:

    I had my own quirky-stand-out comment ready to go…until I saw yours! Love it! Hope you get the book, Naomi :D

    [Reply]

  • http://www.thatpaleoguy.com Jamie

    Sarah,

    In terms of the cereal companies at least, you can almost take things a step further. The big two here in New Zealand (and I am sure they are likely in a similar position in Australia), are owned and run, as profitable companies, by church organisations. Indeed, one, due to it being considered a church-owned charity, enjoys full tax exemption here in New Zealand. That is, they do not pay an ounce of tax on any profits made from the selling of cereal.

    Not only are these cereal companies a nice little money spinner for their church owners, when you trace their history, you also uncover a vegetarian-based agenda. Eating animal flesh was deemed to lead to poor character, whilst “white foods” such as flour and sugar, were deemed to be more “pure” and less likely to see people indulge in the likes of carnal pleasures. I’m not suggesting that this influences today’s nutritional scientists, but these are facts that make up the fabric of our modern nutritional landscape. There is more at play than simple economics for some of these companies.

    [Reply]

    Kezia Reply:

    Hi Jamie

    What are the names of these cereal companies?
    I am from NZ and did not know that would be interested to know more :)

    [Reply]

  • Sue

    You can fool some of the people some of the time but you can’t fool all the people who care enough about their health that they read, listen, observe and research so that the wool can’t be pulled over their eyes. Good health requires being able to sift through the flotsam and jetsom of the “food” industry.

    [Reply]

  • Michelle

    I’m not a ‘conspiracy theory’ type person however I believe the government and big pharma are in bed together. ‘Research’ is conducted (usually sponsored by pharamaceutical groups), a ‘new’ discovery made (be it a so-called cure), the government approve it (via tga or some govt approved body), a cure is marketed (through govt influenced media), the mass population by it, and everyone makes money (except you and me). We now live in a world where illness is created and supposedly cured by the same people/industry. We constanly hear about side effects caused by medication suppose to cure but thats ok because the manufacturer of the original cure has developed another cure for the side effect its original cure created! It just goes on and on… Good health is a huge problem for industry because if people aren’t sick no one will make any money…..

    [Reply]

  • http://dashfieldvintage.blogspot.com Malayka

    This was very interesting. Although I’m not entirely surprised, I didn’t actually know that the Nutritionist society is funding by these big sugar corporations. A couple of nights ago there was a documentary on television about the cereal industry and the way that they have changed they way we eat breakfast simply through clever marketing. People really do need to become more aware of what is going on and the foods they are eating. It’s all quite scary really!

    [Reply]

  • Angela Tu

    wow Sarah! so great that a blogger/ celebrity has an opinion on Nutrition. An uninformed, trite and uselessly stupid opinion…OH BUT WAIT i’m giving away a copy of the book, that I’m promoting! How untrustworthy to have money drive anything.

    Give me a break. seriously. If shock jock crap like this was outlawed in australia us Dietitians would have a lot easier job trying to make normal, everyday Australians healthy. We aren’t paid by any companies, we just try and sift through the garbage that is plastered across screens (computer and otherwise) everyday to confuse the public. Pull your head in.
    I will never read your blog again.

    [Reply]

    Cheryl Reply:

    Did she say YOU were paid by these companies? Maybe you should look to your governing body and the associations that you belong and see who is really sponsoring them and funding their “clinical trials” and other nutrition trials. It is public knowledge that large food companies and pharmaceutical companies fund dietetic associations. Its too bad that the truth is too “shock jock” for you.

    Is Sarah gaining anything from promoting a really great book… NO! Does your association gain something from promoting soda and artificial sweetener as “fine to consume”? Hell Yes, with a lot of dollar signs after it.

    [Reply]

    Angela Tu Reply:

    stop reading blogs. get a degree.

    [Reply]

    Cheryl Reply:

    Multiple degrees including nutrition. Fruitful and successful career. Thank you very much.

    Robyn Reply:

    Gosh Angela how many people would you like to offend in one post?

    I don’t know why people who don’t have degrees even read this blog, I mean they can’t possibly have anything of value to contribute can they?

    Seeing as you clearly consider yourself to be someone of superior intelligence, I don’t understand why you are not happy to consider all the opinions presented to you, and come to your own (calm) conclusions. I think Kristy, below, provides a really lovely example of this.

    I can completely understand your anger when you feel like your profession of choice is being attacked, but why are you assuming that this way of thinking is wrong – rather than what we have been told by the ‘experts’ for the last fifty or so years?

    To finish with a pertinent quote from Schopenhauer that I am pretty sure Sarah has used on an earlier post in her blog:

    ‘All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident’.

    Seems to me you’re kind of at the violent oppostion stage….. :)

    Julian Skinner Reply:

    Got one too. Robert Lustig is almost certainly way better qualified than you and he calls sugar poison. There is already far more evidence against fructose than there ever was against saturated fat. Why do you care if people stop eating sugar? What possible harm can they do themselves by not eating it? Maybe the real concern is that we won’t need dietitians and nutritionists so much anymore.

    Kate Reply:

    Julian – I am a nutritionist and I agree with everything Robert Lustig has written about sugar. Please don’t be so quick to assume we are obsolete idiots!

    seeker Reply:

    ohh dear oh dear …
    sarah … i think maybe send ange a copy as a farewell gift … she will need it more than us if she never reads your blog again … non?!
    i am so excited to read it, but am happy to buy it if needs be … we must help those who need it most …
    with lovingkindness,
    xo :)

    [Reply]

    Queenie Reply:

    Cheryl, I just wanted to say that your reply was one of the most beautiful and non-confrontational comebacks that I’ve seen for a long time on a blog and thanks!

    Angela – It doesn’t matter if you don’t agree so much as how you don’t agree. Why not argue your case instead of insulting people.

    [Reply]

    Amy S Reply:

    I feel sorry for you Angela. The truth hurts sometimes, doesn’t it?

    [Reply]

  • Kristy

    Hi Sarah,

    As someone who is currently studying nutrition through a major Australian university I can see the difficulties and contradictions that arise when marrying up ‘traditional’ learning in this field with newer, wider ideas and concepts that I have come to believe by doing my own research and reading. Certainly there are issues with the traditional ways that some nutritionists have educated themselves and their lack of flexibility and further learning. As with all health professionals, nutritionists need to keep up to date or end up with outdated ideas, advice and remedies for their patients/clients. Open mindedness in this field is essential especially when there is such a constant influx of new research and studies making it an inexact and evolving science.

    Cheers,
    Kristy

    [Reply]

    Peckingbird Reply:

    Excellent comment, Kristy!

    [Reply]

  • Caroline Bartle

    Hi Sarah.
    Thanks for taking a stand against us ‘bodgy’ nutritionists. You have made me see the light and the error in our ways. I promise I will stop taking endorsements from Nestle, even though I was hoping to add my own wing to Flinders Medical Centre and some more koi carp for my piano-shaped pool. I guess I’ll just have to rely on my skills in evaluating – no, that’s not it – angrily giving my opinion about bodgy articles.

    ‎1. No Sarah, you’re a liar. I won’t enjoy this one at all.
    2. Bodgy is not a word. I believe you are lying to me again.
    3. Yeah, I’m super rich from all the endorsements I get from Coca-Cola. DRINK COKE, GET DENTAL CARIES EVERYONE.
    4. I W…ILL make up my own damn mind. Freedom of speech and all that. You’re a freaking idiot.
    5. OMG THE DAA WORKS WITH NESTLE. I’M GOING TO BURN DOWN THE BUILDING NOW AND THEN WRITE ABOUT IT ON MY SHITTY BLOG.
    6. I find this blog ‘bodgy.’
    7. RAGE.

    Regards,
    Caroline Bartle
    FUTURE BODGY DIETITIAN.

    [Reply]

    Cheryl Reply:

    And you don’t see the conflict of interest with Nestle? Half the “food” they put out there is a bunch of crap laden with sugar (a real poison), then they turn around and take a huge tax right off by donating a wing to a hospital. They profit off this “food”, influence dietary policy at the association level, then they “help” all the sick people with their big hospital wing. That is very Interesting, considering 70% of current illness is dietary and environmentally related.

    [Reply]

    Caroline Bartle Reply:

    Can I just say that I realise some of my words were harsh, and I apologise profusely for that. But as somebody who studies and works very hard to become a dietitian, I find it extremely frustrating when somebody puts something on the Internet (that everybody can see) that blacklists our entire profession. It is unfair. If you knew about the DAA, you would know that their code of ethics states that dietitians are not able to directly profit from endorsements or promotions. You would also know that food service dietitians work with major food companies (even unhealthy ones) as part of their job. It does not make them a sellout or evil or anything like that. All we want to do is make people’s lives healthier and better, and it’s people who post stuff online about how we don’t do our jobs properly that makes our lives difficult. We’ve had four years of training for this. Just realise that the accredited dietitians (APDs) are of the highest level and do NOT lie to the public.

    [Reply]

    dana Reply:

    Hi Caroline,
    I’m not sure if you realise this, but if you google your name now, it appears as ‘Caroline Bartle, Future Dodgy Dietician’. Possibly not the best forum to be so rude if you were hoping clients to find you in the future!

    [Reply]

    Julian Skinner Reply:

    Take money from whomever you wish, the rest of us will make our own conclusions about the integrity of any subsequent advice you try to give us.

    [Reply]

    London Reply:

    The same could be said about Sarah being paid to endorse certain products? Not an attack, but it is no different.

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Actually Sarah is honest about where her loyalties lie. She will admit upfront when she has been paid to endorse a product. And she isn’t giving advice claiming to come from a medical background, she gives advice from a personal one and references experts where necessary. HUGE difference, in my opinion.

    Lisa Reply:

    Admit product endorsements upfont? No she doesn’t. And she does give advice based on the Intergrative Nutritionalist course she did. Perhaps do some homework before you post such comments.

  • http://www.changeonewoman.com Tarryne

    eloquent

    [Reply]

  • Katrina

    Goodness me, some people seem to have terrible difficulty tolerating other peoples opinions.
    Anyway recently i was told that i should see a dietician. Our nearest one has two jobs one as a dietician the other at Nestle. I laughed. Needless to say i did not go.

    [Reply]

    Jan Reply:

    Katrina, do you think this dietician works on the Milo production line or something? Did you know that Nestle own such companies as Lean Cuisine & Maggie and have a fully trained team of Dieticians & Nutritionalists overeeing their products. Here’s a link to the Nestle website. Think you will find it quite interesting that they have a section devoted to Nutrition, Health and Wellness

    http://www.nestle.com.au/NutritionAndHealth/Pages/default.asx

    [Reply]

  • Lauren H

    As a first year student in Nutritional Medicine I am fascinated all the information you are supplying and you have enforced one of my first lessons – Be a Doubter of the many claims we are bombarded with on a daily basis. As consumers I believe it is our responsibility to care for ourselves, be informed as much as possible and question everything. I’d love a copy of David’s book to read as part of my own Nutritionist journey. Thanks for starting the conversation.
    Ps im in week one of I quit sugar! Eek!

    [Reply]

  • Miranda

    I am also studying at an Australian University to be a dietitian. I believe that many of the problems you are talking about are not from dietitians or other qualified health professionals but from industry who market horribly over processed foods. The less processed your food is and the healthier you eat the less u have to worry about. you don’t have to eat it or support those companies. The other major problem is some ‘nutritionists’ (who have no university qualifications) giving out masses of misinformation. No dietitian I know takes any sort of endorsements, nor have any us up and coming dietetic students been offered any. The DAA (dietitians association of Australia) is also a not for profit organisation = no endorsements there either. We are trying so hard to get the right information to people to help them lead heathy lives but are constantly having to fight against the deluge of bad advice and information out there!

    Cheers
    Miranda

    [Reply]

    Rebecca Reply:

    Great comment, Miranda.
    My comment? To all the Dieticians/Nutritionists out there, either studying or qualified, who like Sarahs blog or not, just make sure that the information you are handing out to people is the information that YOU truly believe to be true. Even if sometimes, that information goes against the provailing wisdom.
    And question everything.
    Getting off soapbox now…

    [Reply]

    Nutrition by Nature Reply:

    Miranda, I’m a Nutrition student and just have to say… The days are gone when anyone could call themselves a “nutritionist”. We now have to complete a university level bachelor degree (3-4 years full time equivalent) and will have to register with a governing body of Nutritionists. Many then go on to complete Masters degrees and Post Docs in Human Nutrition (as I will be). What you are saying about Nutritionists is completely misleading. It may shock you to learn that I turned down the offer of enrollment in a Dietetics degree to study Nutritional Medicine instead.

    [Reply]

  • Sue

    Can someone explain to me the difference between a Nutritionist and a Dietician please? PS: the food pyramid that is still being held up by dieticians as the “ideal” diet is a furphy!

    [Reply]

    Miranda Reply:

    A dietitian in Australia is someone who has studied nutrition at at university level in a course approved by the DAA (dietitians association of Australia) and is registerered with the DAA. Dietitians don’t just get approved and then keep their accreditation for life either, every year that must show to the DAA that they are working on furthering their skills and knowledge in order to keep their accreditation.
    Anyone can call themselves a Nutritionist as up until recently there was no accreditation for it. I believe the DAA have worked to develop an accreditation for nutritionists and approved Uni degrees to meet the accreditation but I don’t know where that is at.
    As for the healthy food pyramid. I haven’t used one in the 5 years I have been at Uni. It is out dated and that’s why it’s not used anymore. We use the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating which has a great info and guidelines in for people as well as a circular diagram to help show people the proportion of their meals that should be made up by different food groups. U can get a copy of the brochure if you want one by emailing phd.publications@health.gov.au

    [Reply]

  • Tanya

    Hi Sarah,

    I have problems listening to your interesting podcasts because my laptop speakers are crap and my kids make to much noise to hear anyway.

    As an engaging(?) comment would you consider having downloadable transcripts of your interviews in the future? I’ve downloaded transcripts from Nourishing Traditions before and think it’s a great service.

    Cheers, and thanks for all you do.

    [Reply]

  • Rebecca

    I had dieted for years – counted calories, followed the food pyramid, exercised daily and nothing worked.

    Until I discovered Paleo. For me, cutting out grains and sugar has been the best possible thing I could ever do for my body. I feel fabulous, have lost nearly 20 kilos and have so much more energy.

    We are getting sicker and sicker – something isn’t working and yet we are still believing the same old lies we have had forced down our throats for years. I am surrounded by people getting diagnosed with diabetes – in their late 30′s.

    Our bodies are amazing – we just had to stop abusing them with processed food.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.changeonewoman.com Tarryne

    Have any of the people complaining actually read the book or at the very least clicked on the links. The very first one, The American society for Nutrition, lists its sponsors on the members page.

    Macdonals, Coca-cola, Pepsi and MONSANTO are all listed.

    Just let that sink in for a moment.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.angieathome.blogspot.com/ Angela

    I too would love to have a copy of this book. I find it astounding, and deeply worrying that in the affluent world people are dying from “good” nutrition and “healthy” diets full of low fat, high grain diets.

    I’m so glad to have found your blog Sarah. You have inspired me to try sugar-free, grain free living. I’ve never felt better, and the 5 kilos, lost whilst chowing down on a high fat diet, is a bonus.

    [Reply]

  • Prudi

    I loved this and last weeks podcasts. I changed my attitude towards fats about 12 months ago and have not looked back. I have tried to challenge the ‘bad’ habits of my mother and sister in relation to this (both have big tubs of margarine in their fridges) without luck. I would love to get a copy of this book to hopefully help in my efforts to convince them to make some changes for the better. And well, food just tastes soooo much better with butter/coconut oil/lard/ghee!!!!!!!!

    [Reply]

    Wade Reply:

    I’ve always loved full-fat food and resisted my mother’s shift to ‘low-fat’. Having discovered David’s book, and then Sarah’s website, I have been reducing my sugar (reducing grains is harder).

    But mum doesn’t want to know because she’s bought in to the “nutrition” peddled by the mass-media. I’ve stopped trying to get her to change.

    [Reply]

  • Gabriella

    I have just checked out those websites and who their sponsors and partners are. All I can say is WOW!!! Coca cola, Kelloggs, Nestle and drug companies in bed dieticians. How sad that people who are trained to give us advice on how best to fuel our bodies ay be giving us less than truthful advice?? From now on I will be very wary about what a nutritionist says.

    [Reply]

  • Fiona

    I’ve been following a low fructose lifestyle since the beginning of the year but my better half is very resistant to the change – I’m working on him slowly but surely (he now looks at the nutritional panel on packets of food to check the sugar content for me when he goes shopping). It’s a start :0)

    [Reply]

  • Kerry

    Hi, 5 weeks into no sugar,low carbs,more protein & good fat, feeling great,losing more weight. Have read David’s other book & would love a copy of new one to share the knowledge with family & friends.I agree its so frustrating when they don’t listen to you & think your crazy.Thanks for all the great info :-)

    [Reply]

  • Amelia

    Great podcast Sarah, as always (any chance of putting them on iTunes?). And I think David’s latest book sounds amazing (I’d love to win one) – after reading all about IQS, I’m a big believer in good fats.
    As a Nutritional Medicine student, I’m determined to make ensure any future clients I have know the truth. It’s so upsetting to see so much fake information out there that is ultimately so damaging!

    [Reply]

    seeker Reply:

    itunes! yes please! – brilliant idea amellia, thank you! :)

    [Reply]

  • http://@Luluguru011 Lisa

    I have also worked in a weight loss company that had Qualified Nutritional support over the phone and all the workers were back packers in a call centre. I could not believe i worked for such a disloyal company i had to quit.

    [Reply]

  • Lee Robinson

    It amazes me that as we are seeing more and more illnesses,cancer etc being diagnosed,that we as seemingly switched on humans,don’t look at the one constant in our lives,food.I often hear people say our foods have changed so much over the years,it must be all the chemicals and additives,yet continue to eat as they always have .Too much refined food,too many foods with hidden sugar,lots more grains than ever before,’cos they “reduce cholesterol”.The sad thing is we look at packaging and and the “experts”telling us that this is what we need.Is it just denial and addiction to such unhealthy,life destroying foods?Why do more and more children have allergies too?Is it because we are feeding them the same unhealthy food at a young age before their gut is developed?I think if you can get through to the young parents of today,hopefully the next generation will be a healthier living bunch but as long as nutritionists are aligned with companies that are sponsoring them,we have no hope.Money will win over morals everytime unfortunately.

    [Reply]

  • Cec

    When my daughter was 3 months old she was diagnosed with a chronic liver disease. She had complications from the first major surgery and ended up having a total of 3 surgeries all within two months. She is now 9 months old and relatively healthy. We are so blessed to still have her with us. As a result of her chronic condition, she requires a very clean diet. I truly believe that all the processed foods we have put in our body has caused lots of illnesses. I am slowly in the process of changing my family’s diet. I do I love Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions and David Gillespie’s Sweet Poison. I am looking forward to reading David’s new book. :)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.timeframed.blogspot.com Shaz

    The energy I am experiencing from just 8 days of “NO SUGAR” plus adding 3 tablespoons of coconut oil per day is just phenominal (not to mention losing 3.5kilos). For the last 10 years I have tried everything I was “supposed” to eg. the “Food Pyramid!!!!!!!!!!!!” I even had a trainer say to me, “Don’t eat any fat, but you can eat a whole bag of jelly beans or snakes every day if you want to. It will fill you up and not make you crave and stave of the munchies??????????????” Oh my god. No wonder I put on weight from doing what the “experts” told me to do.

    [Reply]

  • Jason

    Well, if this is the case, there is no point giving us this information unless we know who is funding who. We would like to know who to believe.

    So..

    If nutritionists are paid by the breakfast cereal companies and the peak bodies are funded by major soft drink and junk food companies, what are their names?

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    Sigh.. As a nutritionist I find this generalisation a little offensive.

    I am what you would call a ‘holistic nutritionist’, I spent 5 years studying nutritional medicine and have never once had any association with any company or product and I never will. I like to encourage my clients to eat whole foods and cut out almost anything that comes in a package. I encourage my clients to eat full-fat products and I encourage them to drastically reduce the amount of refined sugar that they consume. I actually agree with many of the views that you have about food and eating and I think it’s awful that you would label nutritionists as the enemy.

    I also think that you are confusing Nutritionists with Dieticians.

    [Reply]

    Julian Skinner Reply:

    Good for you. Maybe we need another qualification a sort of “certified no conflict of interest” for people like you.

    [Reply]

    Lillian Davenport Reply:

    Kudos to you!! Keep fighting the good fight. Your advice sounds exactly like what I’d like every single one of my friends and family members to heed.

    [Reply]

  • Kirsty

    as a former sugar addict, i can attest to the amazing benefits of quitting the white stuff – yes I’ve lost a few kilos and my face and stomach are definitely thinner, but one of the most amazing things for me is losing the sugar cravings! its like being free from an addiction – i used to drink maple syrup straight from the bottle, now sugar doesn’t interest me at all, & i feel better and have loads more energy too. i love reading all the comments on this blog, and it makes me realise that the anti-fructose movement is really growing, but so many people still don’t realise the damage it does to their bodies, so Sarah I think its great how you are spreading the word, and the way you present the info in a way that is easy to digest. i think society is gradually making a return to the unprocessed foods that our grandparents grew up with, and that this will see a big turnaround in the health of our country. keep spreading the word :)

    [Reply]

  • Mia Bluegirl

    I refuse to believe that individual nutritionists or dieticians would willingly lie to us.

    I would, however, believe that they have been fed outdated and misleading information by the people that are supposed to be properly educating us. In the form of degrees, diplomas and other formal education. The food pyramid we teach our children seems to be where this starts, and continues to snowball from there.

    Personal trainers shouldn’t be exempt from this either. I’m probably biased as my ex was a trainer, but he became qualified in the space of about six weeks. This is NOT a lot of time to teach someone all they need to know about the health of the human body. Especially when most of that is devoted to exercise techniquies and only a few short hours was nutrition. I dont think most people who pay for their services realise how little formal training you need to be giving that sort of qualification. I know some amazing trainers who truly want to help people, and have gone on to study seriously in order to improve upon the intial qualification… however most don’t.

    [Reply]

    Jess Reply:

    Mia I agree with what you’re saying about personal trainers. My brother similarly completed a personal training course in a few months and has worked in gyms as a trainer. I have also has experience with trainers giving me nutritional advice which now, knowing better, I would never follow, like eating diet fruit yoghurt (full of fructose), and lots of ‘wholegrain’ wheat products (god I was bloated). Not to mention the common advice that LOTS of cardio is the best way to lose weight (what a joke!).

    [Reply]

  • Alisha lynch

    I am so excited about losing my post baby weight with the the help of all the information I have been gathering this pregnancy from sarah and david. I am due in 4 days with my second bub, I had them close together as my daughter is just 15 months so I am much heavier this pregnancy due to this and from eating soooo much sugar this pregnancy. It has made me ponder the sugar problem in my diet and so I purchased sweet poison and sarahs IQS e book but I didn’t want to start anything until having bub. This latest book of Davids also intrigues, as a mum, as someone with sugar addiction, and as a naturopath. Thanks to penguin, David and Sarah for a second chance at a free copy!

    [Reply]

  • Linda

    I’m not sure if it’s just because Nutritionists are paid to say certain things are healthy, but it’s definitely a huge part of the story. I believe that University is where the trouble lies. How are text books selected? These form the basis for the ideas and practices that are honed in the years to follow and then seem to perpetuate the lies to the next generation of students. Even very intelligent people will believe the lies we are being told about nutrition because they naively trust and never question the government bodies and other leading associations on these topics, even when the research, and society prove otherwise. Imagine if tomorrow everyone woke up knowing that the amount of sugar in these foods in supermarkets was detrimental to our health – big business would go down the drain in a big BIG way!

    [Reply]

  • Angela

    I’d love to read more on this subject as I am trying to inform myself and those around me, and I reckon the European market is just as ‘polluted’ as the Australian/American. Hope you ship books to the EU!

    [Reply]

    dana Reply:

    try http://www.booktopia.com.au :-)

    [Reply]

  • Jo

    I’d love a copy – am new to this while sugar free idea – have just read the ebook and have been discussing going sugar free with hubby. Feel like there is so much info in my head right now – it hurts! Would love the book to read to get more of an idea on whether or not we are prepared for this lifestyle change. I think it would alsocome in handy to recommend to the inlaws when they sneer at us for not feeding our ‘poor neglected kids’ sugary foods!

    [Reply]

  • annie

    Am new to this way of thinking about food.
    After being told the benefits of lowfat etc for so long, I’m very interested in learning more, especially as I have just been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. Hoping for the same amazing results as lots of others here have had and improving the health of my family along the way.

    [Reply]

  • http://witnessfit.blogspot.com/ Casie

    Thanks for providing the information so we can make better informed choices. I kinda knew it happened in the US, but not here in Aus!

    By the way I’m three days into a low fructose/no sugar eating plan and feel amazing without the bloat! A-mazing!

    [Reply]

  • http://svasti.wordpress.com Svasti

    After a few months of being sugar free and eating (good) fats, I’ve lost around 6kgs at last count. This is without changing anything else in my diet or exercise routine (cycling, yoga, walking as per normal).

    It still amazes me how stringently people hold onto “eating fat makes you fat” without really thinking it through or considering the alternatives.

    Of course, it doesn’t help that marketing budgets dictate so many messages about what’s good and what isn’t. When we’re talking about anything else other than our health, it’s buyer beware. But when it’s about food, health or fitness, there need to be higher standards. With a growing body of evidence of people like us who are giving up sugar and changing the way we eat, I’m amazed that there’s still so much resistance.

    But then, sugar is a massive industry. And just like the oil industry, I guess people don’t want to have to think about alternatives if they don’t have to. Even if we’re running out of oil or becoming fatter and sicker…

    [Reply]

  • shell

    You can understand why Society is so over weight. Its amazing when you look at the grocery labels everything has sugar in them. In things that you would never think sugar would be in. I think the public is being very miss informed. To much money being made in the sugar industry. As with cigarettes they know they kill but will not ban them . Sugar is doing the same.

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    All this information is so incredibly inspiring and encouraging! I’ve just given birth to my 3rd child and trying desperately not to fall victim to post natal depression for the 3rd time. So far I am so much happier and bouncier having given up sugar! Would love to read more to keep me motivated!

    [Reply]

  • Adrian

    Seems like just another fad diet to me (with a bit of conspiracy theory thrown in) – promoting . . . big fats lies, indeed! No wonder people are confused about what to eat. I guess the only way a lawyer is going to sell books is to discredit the people who are qualified in nutrition. I choose to base my diet around the Government’s Dietary Guidelines which promote whole foods – wholegrain breads and cereals, fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts, lean meat, lower fat dairy foods and healthy fats.

    [Reply]

  • Claire

    Hi Sarah & David,

    I am on the 7th week of the IQS programme and have really enjoyed the process. I have lost about 4 kgs and have FINALLY identified that it is wheat and rice that seems to cause my very bad bloating!

    I have however had a couple of negative side effects that I am still trying to wrap my head around, primarily the reoccurrence of panic attacks that I haven’t had to deal with in the majority of situation for a very long time. Any thoughts??

    This week I have had blood results (instigated by just crazy levels of exhaustion) show I have high cholesterol (6.7) and am over the normal glucose levels resulting in a request for a glucose tolerance test (oh they are so yucky). I am only 38!! I really wish I had had these tests done prior to commencing the IQS experiment to see if these have actually improved.

    As a person going down the road of diabetes testing and knowing the prescribed dietary advice I will be receiving from my dr (who is very good and very lovely), it is overwhelming to head down a road of willingly rejecting current medical advice even though I believe I am on the right track to finally feel energetic and maintain a healthy weight (I think I am currently in the healthy weight range for my height). I would love a copy of Davids book to help with this process.

    Thanks Sarah & David for your amazing generosity and all those who have contributed comments because although I haven’t written before I have been piggy backing on all of your experiences!!

    Cheers
    Claire

    [Reply]

    Amanda Parker Reply:

    Perhaps try including the green superfoods – spiralina, barley, alfalfa – all alkalising, all high in vital minerals & vitamins, spiralina especially has properties that help to balance sugar cravings, levels etc. These green complete foods have a very stabilising effect on the body & its functions. Speak to a health care practitioner (Naturopath etc)- a good one will work hand in hand with your GP to balance your self & find good health.

    [Reply]

  • Jane

    I whole-heartedly understand and emathise Kat and Liz. I am a nurse too, and I resent some of the things that I have to say to people to “fall into line” with current dietary and health advice. I feel like to am doing more harm than good. When people with gastroenterological issues ask for advice I deplore saying “eat wholemeal grains for fibre”… I feel sick advising people to cut down of high cholesterol foods and substitute with processed fats and high sugar alternates which are just setting them up for auto immune and diabetic issues down the track. I feel like a part of the problem – and it’s true, western medicine is a self-perpetuating cycle of bad advice and treatment!! To advise what I know to be true would equate ridicule and disciplinary action from my peers and management. It is very hard – I understand what it feels like to get into a career to help people, and feel you are doing the opposite. It’s soul destroying and very confusing when seeking an alternate direction in life. I hear you ladies!

    [Reply]

    Jane Reply:

    Apologies – this is a reply to Kat and Liz’s comments at 2.11 and 3.10pm

    [Reply]

    Liz Reply:

    Thankyou so much for your reply! It is so encouraging to hear. For those in my profession that I have disclosed my struggles I have been ridiculed. And most people can’t understand why I finished my degree and am not following the career path. I finished it only so that I can pursue a masters in a totally different field. Alternative therapies is enticing, but hard to pursue in the country. I am feeling totally lost for direction at the moment and really appreciate your kind words. It is such a fantastic community of people on this blog. Although I feel Sarah is going to cope a massive backlash for this post. I know. I’ve experienced it firsthand.

    [Reply]

    Jane Reply:

    You’re most welcome Liz. I fear that there are so many forces behind the dietary advice dished out medical mob that backlash and condescension of Sarah’s angle is probably inevitable. It’s good that there are thinkers and questioners out there who are giving a large number of people a starting point with the truth, and I really applaud and admire Sarah for using her celebrity as a positive currency, it’s fantastic.

    I don’t expect to change the world through nursing, but don’t discount the opportunities to show kindness, so that gets me through.

    As for career alternates… don’t discount distance education. I know a great rural naturopath who studied by distance and had a great time attending study blocks in Sydney. It’s the passion that got him there in the end. You can also do a Masters of Wellness via RMIT, which is distance, has many different angles of approach, and you can tap into your pre-existing knowledge, cast off old ideas and introduce some new ones. Anyway, lots to think about, and I do hope you find your path… :)

  • Tabetha

    I’ve been reading about your research on fat and weight loss quite a bit. (I actually started reading this blog with your very first “I Quit Sugar” post and have been a fan ever since.) The more and more I read, the more I am infuriated at how Americans (and the rest of the world, I just say Americans because being American, I can only tell the story from my standpoint) have been mislead by medicine and government to think that one of the most natural things in the world (fat) is actually terrible for us. Most of us in the early part of our lives now have been raised on more processed sugars and grains than fat. I know that when I was just getting into my teenage years, my dad was on a huge low-fat kick, and I rebelled against it. I love fat! I love fatty foods! I also eat them in what, for me, seems like a ‘natural’ moderation. Unfortunately, because of the dietary guidelines and the vast availability of processed sugars and grains, they have always been a huge part of my diet. It’s hard to give up those things when I have such vivid memories tied to them and eat them out of habit. I am very overweight and the only real success with losing weight that I have ever had was when I followed a lower carb, higher fat, no sugar type diet. Finding this blog and reading everything you have been writing about fat and sugar have made me slowly start moving towards a diet that I have always known was better for me in the long run; your blog just validated with I was already feeling.

    [Reply]

  • Peter

    Almost everything we do is influenced by political policy, unfortunately.
    I’m enjoying the education I’m receiving from those intelligent, courageous, and motivated enough to dispel the myths that society tries to perpetuate. With that in mind, I would like a copy of Big Fat Lies by David Gillespie.

    [Reply]

  • amyer

    It’s taken me years to figure out that nutrition is what I want to study, and for it to become my career focus …but I’ve held back because I do believe the messages nutritionists and dieticians learn and then preach are so often wrong. It’s conflicting to know that for my opinions to hold any weight, I’d have to learn what I believe is fundamentally flawed!

    [Reply]

  • Rachel

    I am fascinated to watch Peter fitzsimmons on the Sunday night programme this week talking about quitting sugar. In the press shot online he has David’s book in hand.Hopefully this report will ignite greater dialogue amongst more and more people. Changing the accepted wisdom is not going to happen in a hurry. I have people look at me as though I have just bought snake oil from a traveling caravan! Inspite of these people knowing me to be an educated, intelligent critical thinker they just look at me with a pitiful look that suggests I am fool who has been conned. Sounds like someone’s been conned!

    [Reply]

  • Theresa

    I would love to hear what Rosemary Stanton has to say about
    the ” sugar is poison” approach”. We need our most esteemed Dieticians to Help us
    Navigate this new era of nutrition.

    [Reply]

    dana Reply:

    really? do you really think they update their thinking that much?

    [Reply]

  • Fiona Malone

    This is a conversation that happened in my house today.
    My 8 year old was reading the nutrition information on the packet of something, which my kids have done since they could read.
    She read 99% fat-free. Then she said I wonder how much sugar. After a pause, and reading of the numbers, she announced: more like 99% fat!
    I thought of you. I may not have achieved a sugarless existence here, but I am definitely winning on the education campaign.
    Thanks for educating me so I can educate them.

    [Reply]

    Natalie Reply:

    Ahhhh I loved reading this! Thanks for sharing Fiona!

    [Reply]

  • Natalie

    As a health teacher, who used to teach Food Tech in the secondary system in Victoria, from years 7 up to VCE, I’m curious to see where the curriculum goes over the next few years. Many of us can remember Cookery the Australian Way (I’m 29 but it seems to have had an impact on the generation before me) and cooking everything from scones to soups out of it. While health/food/home ec curricula aims to give young people skills in food preparation, it also starts to dictate what is “healthy” (remember the food pyramid? yeah it left us ages ago but still lingers the walls of school kitchens!). Students study the Heart Foundation, low GI, that saturated fats are the Satan of the culinary arts. I am glad so many food teachers push the value of food choices like butter over marg, but when half of the recipes are gluten and sugar based (13yo don’t need knives when making scones or rum balls!) I think it will take a while before classes shift.

    Now working mental health, I see so many young people with eating disorders who have taken ideas about fats/carbs/protein and warped them into rituals of restriction and “self-control”, patterns of eating seen as abnormal or sick. My decision to cut gluten and sugar sits in that camp socially and is only accepted by colleagues if I give them a medical framework, “my doctor wants me to try it”. I wonder if I’m brave enough to prep a semesters worth of recipes that don’t highlight food processes like gelatinisation, dextrinisation or carmelisation using wheat or fructose.

    Parents and carers out there – what messages are your kids getting about food decisions?

    [Reply]

    Angela Reply:

    I’m a teacher, and have found myself teaching secondary cooking to year eights this year, though I am an English teacher. I find it terribly frustrating as I have to teach a curriculum that tells students that the standard food pyramid is healthy. There is no way that my head of department would allow me to teach an alternative diet.

    The best I can do is tell students that it is okay to look at alternatives, but I’m not actually allowed to veer off the curriculum.

    [Reply]

  • Catherine

    Make your own food from scratch, it’s that simple! Processed packaged food is full of salt and sugar so DON’T BUY IT! Drink pure rain water and tea, consume your daily requirements of fresh preferably organically grown fruit and vegetables. And get some exercise.
    It’s pretty basic girls and boys, and is absolutely not the rocket science some people make it out to be.

    [Reply]

    Han Reply:

    love this!

    [Reply]

    Catherine Reply:

    Phew thank you! Some one who get’s it. :) Thank you Han

    [Reply]

    Biddie Reply:

    Hmmmm….Could we just back off a leeeeetle bit on the self satisfied smugness here?

    I don’t think anyone is suggesting this stuff is rocket science, but many of us have other distractions in our lives. I personally have three children, run a small business , have a husband who works 12 hours a day and live in the inner city. How bout you?

    Unless you have grown up on an isolated, self sufficient farm with hippie nudist parents, you’ll be hard pressed to find loads of people who aren’t just doing their best to dig themselves out from under the tonnes of questionable nutritional information and convenience foods that we have been bombarded with for many years.

    The supermarket is a necessary battleground, and I am keen to learn all that I can to make healthy choices for my family and offer some sort of variety to the numerous palates that I have to cater for. All within the limited time and budget available to me.

    David Gillespie has the good grace to constantly acknowledge the difficulties of feeding his family of eight from the ever more limited supermarket aisles, and thank his wife Lizzie who has had to go to enormous lengths, learning to prepare food according to the principles they believe in.

    Try coming up with breakfasts, lunches (or lunchboxes), dinners and snacks every single day of the week, for five people.
    Try suggesting to your nine year old that he drink ‘rainwater and tea’ (and where should I get said rainwater – from the filthy tank attached to the side of my house?) and take organic vegetables in his lunchbox. And good luck.

    [Reply]

    ssisme Reply:

    I absolutely hear you! Doing the best you can is doing a great job. I’m so interested and reasonably well informed about good nutrition but I can’t make it happen at every meal and in every lunchbox. I shop at the supermarket, I often buy non-organic vegetables, my kids eat pasta and ice creams and not enough fish. But I try. I get informed, we try new things. And I don’t beat myself around the ears when the extraordinary pressures of modern life make me open a tin of baked beans for dinner. :)

    [Reply]

    Queenie Reply:

    I DID partly grow up on a hippy commune eating lentils and brown rice and I only have one child and live in the middle of a major city and I still find it a daily battle to prepare a recess and lunch that won’t end up in the schoolyard bin, that involves ingredients I can afford if it does end up in the bin, that doesn’t involve me spending half a day a week baking and processing, that can be easily packaged and quickly eaten, and that doesn’t contain sugar, white flour or vegetable oil (which is all palm oil).
    Catherine, we all know what you write and we are not rocket scientists and we don’t need to be. What we are discussing here is how to achieve it when for the most part, women (and let’s face it, it still is in the vast majority of households the woman’s decision and work to choose and prepare a lot of the food) are no longer in the kitchen for 4 or 5 hours a day.
    I have lived in developing countries with my ex-husband’s family, where the women prepare everything and all meals are healthy and balanced. I would say my sister-in-law spent on average 6 hours a day shopping, cleaning, preparing, cooking, serving and cleaning up. If you have the time to do this, you are very lucky and you must have a lot of financial support. For the rest of us, we make do with what time, money, resources and energy we have to look after out kids whom we love dearly. Your point is smug and not very useful in a discussion that is as much about big business, health, government regulation, power, and the rapidly changing face of society as it is about what we choose to put in our mouths.

    Han Reply:

    I think the point Catherine is trying to make is that there is so much information out there that its impossible to accommodate all views. By following simple guidelines like not eating processed or packaged foods etc you can improve your health and not be victims of big business psuedo science.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.kiwiatheart-leonie.blogspot.com Leonie

    When I read about eating real food 18 months ago, it ended 25 years of believing the diet industry, government rubbish and released me to really learn about the food I put in my mouth.
    I live everyday with two autoimmune diseases, leaky gut and food allergies. I was struggling to eat because I had so much conflicting information.
    NOW, I am gluten free (coeliacs), egg and dairy free and sugar free. I eat loads of coconut oil, fruit, veges, meat, fish and chicken.
    As a result I have not had so much as a sniffle for 15 months. I am healthy, my immune system is strong.
    I feel blessed to have this knowledge and Im always excited to learn more.
    Keep up your great work Sarah. I love your blog.

    [Reply]

  • ms jane

    This old girl used to sport a mohawk and loved a protest! I can feel my anarchist roots stirring…If enough of us make the changes and embrace a new paradigm we may just be able to create a brave new sugar-free world. Fight the power!

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Mohawk? F*** yeah!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.yogacapebreton.com Jeri

    Hi Sarah,
    Jess Ainscough introduced me to your site through her blog and I am so thankful for that. I am a Learning Center (Special Education) teacher in Canada and have made it my mission to change the eating habits of my students through information & by example, if nothing else. I have shown them & discussed the message of movies such as Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead and the reaction is overwhelming. To see them begin to bring fruit into school in their lunch pails rather than something sweet is ‘sweet’. All sugary drinks are banned from my room. We purchased a water cooler and they now drink it by the gallon. I am realistic enough to know that I may only be changing their habits for 5.5 hours per day but I am happy with that:)
    Thanks for your insight:)
    Jeri

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    I work in a preventative health field for an organisation that is focused on reducing chronic disease and improving people’s health (and I get scoffed at when I talk about having fat milk instead of skinny and having coconut oil and nut butter daily). My boss went to the US on a study tour and upon returning he told the story that shortly after getting off the plane he sat somewhere to have a coffee, and was observing a stereotypical American family (parents and a son, maybe 12 or 13 yrs old) sitting nearby. The son ordered a super size soft drink (bucket!) – and then proceeded to empty 4 PACKETS OF SUGAR INTO THE SOFT DRINK. We seem to absorb so much from overseas… I pray that Australians get the message before we get THAT desensitised and, well, sick.

    [Reply]

  • Jess

    Have a look at this financial supporter of the american dietetic association!
    http://www.sugar.org/.

    [Reply]

  • Krystal

    Saddening and infuriating to think that the very same government institutions/bodies that are in place to protect and help us are, the ones who are feeding us towards an early grave. It is, for me, a distressing picture of the struggle for power and money, and an example of the ethical blindsidedness and ignorance of people who are jaded by personal wealth, rather than global health.

    [Reply]

  • London

    Hi Sarah

    I love your blog, but please can you post some non sugar related posts again? They are getting a bit same-y!

    [Reply]

    Nina Reply:

    thats because she is trying to ‘sell’ something!

    [Reply]

  • Open minded

    HI David and Sarah

    I am just wondering if you both read the draft updated Dietary Guidelines developed by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia? And if so did you provided them with feedback in regard to your concerns about sugar and low fat foods?

    http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/media/releases/2011/providing-scientific-evidence-healthier-australian-diets

    I predominantly agree with your claims and have given up sugar myself, but would like to hear their side at the same time for balance. I think they are an ethical organisation and vigorously review research before making any claims.

    Please answer this question as I think it is important to disclose whether the research you have been basing your advice on has been included in their reviews and if the research stands up to the other research out there.

    Also I would like them to change their recommendations so that people are advised to avoid sugar, processed food, and polyunsaturated fats.

    Thanks

    [Reply]

    David Gillespie Reply:

    I did read them (and the evidence report that goes with them) and I provided feedback. Here’s a copy of what I said: http://www.howmuchsugar.com/resources/Documents/Response%20to%20Guidelines.pdf

    I note that “The NHMRC commissioned the Dietitians Association of Australia to undertake the systematic literature review for the Dietary Guidelines.”

    [Reply]

    Open minded Reply:

    Thank you David. I am very impressed with what you have written and you and Sarah have finally won me over! I read Sweet Poison and quit sugar but was having trouble getting my head around the saturated fat information.

    I wonder if the reason the dietary guidelines have not yet been released is that the NHMRC are now reviewing you feedback. I have sent them an email asking them to explain.

    I would love to win a copy of your book.

    Again thanks.

    [Reply]

    Open minded Reply:

    HI David

    I just received a reply from the NHMRCA. There response is to be expected but they acknowledge they are reviewing the information on sugar.

    “Thank you for your email. As you are aware, NHMRC has just closed its consultation period for the revised Dietary Guidelines. We are now reviewing all submissions, including those on sugar, and will provide a position on this and all other issues following careful consideration of the best available scientific evidence.”

    Lou

    Kate Reply:

    When I was in my final year of studying nutrition, my lecturer told me that she thought the NHMRC were very close to changing the guidelines to full fat dairy products.
    No idea why she thought this, but I know that she was a senior lecturer and had previously worked with the NHMRC.

    Also.. we were all taught that full fat dairy should always be preferential to low-fat dairy.

  • http://vibrantgrace.com Grace

    Would love a copy of this book!
    Also, I’m looking for reasons why honey is bad. I’ve been using stevia in coffee, tea, etc. but I want to make some homemade granola and every recipe I find calls for at least a little honey. Do you recommend removing honey entirely or is a little bit okay?
    Thanks so much!

    [Reply]

    dana Reply:

    it’s high in fructose – as high, if not higher than white sugar

    [Reply]

    Kelly Reply:

    You can use rice malt syrup :)
    Stevia also comes in liquid form

    [Reply]

    Rachel Reply:

    OMG I LOOOVE Rice Malt Syrup. They sell it at Coles (at least the Coles I go to) in a jar in the health food aisle. I probably love it a bit toooo much, but you can put it in yogurt, bake with it, over home-made pancakes, on toast with half a banana and cinnamon…

    [Reply]

    mel Reply:

    ditto, lovely

  • Wiebke

    Thank you so much for this article. Those are some interesting links.
    And I would love a copy of that book.

    Isn’t is incredible how much power these lobbyist have? It’s terrifying how ruthless they are. I hate how in this world everything is just about money and profit and noone ever gives a shit about anything else. I hate how this world is dominated by greedy companies that ruin our planet but still make nice colourful advertisements that pretend they would care.

    I’m from Germany and our president is currently accused of disloyalty and some other stuff I don’t know the english words for. He resigned but will nevertheless get a honorarium of 200.000 Euros a month! Paid with our taxes! That asshole gehts like 17.000 € a month! Just like that.
    But it seems like in this world you no longer have to be a honest and loyal person. Just fuck everyone over and lie your ass off – the economy will reward you. And I now know for sure that the country of Germany will.

    [Reply]

    seeker Reply:

    wiebke!
    don’t lose faith, we all must keep fighting for truth and integrity and good … otherwise the bad guys win.
    it not fair, but who ever said it would be.
    i know how you feel, i have been having alot of feelings of disappointment, disillusion and disbelief … but then i remember that it’s a fight … and we must just keep going one step after the next and stand up for our ideals in as smart a way as we can, soften the anger, do good deeds, stick together, and generate good karma.
    we must be patient, thats the hard bit, especially when everything looks like its sliding, but with patience we will reach the summit, calmly, intelligently and in good shape. i say this because intellectually i know it to be true, i am, however, still working on it myself!! you are not alone … don’t give up … :)

    [Reply]

  • Cheryl

    This is one of the few thread I have ever read in it’s entirety…ever. There is nothing like food and health to insight extremely heated debate and response. Being in this field I have seen over and over is governments, and all sorts of corporations and associations wants a piece of your health from birth to death, and what goes in your mouth to what comes out. It is control and financially lucrative to use emotion and persuade people’s dietary and health choices. Emotion and fear are commonly used psychological tools to persuade people to do or not do certain things.

    One thing I know for sure, and I am sure Sarah understands this as well, is that NO ONE DIET WORKS FOR EVERYONE. One person’s food is another person’s poison.

    I feel it is prudent to investigate the connections between governing bodies and corporations to find the real reason why all of a sudden we need to go “fat free”, “no-carb”, “low-carb”, “high-carb” or whatever. Experiment and see what works best for you, I guarantee you will be surprised that it won’t be what the latest and greatest recommendations are.

    [Reply]

  • Mark Rickards

    I’ve been on the diet and exercise treadmill almost all my life – with very little success. Even when I lost over 20kg and was looking remarkable, old habits got me back to my original weight and more.
    I was lent a copy of David’s book, which sat unread for about three months. Oh boy was I stoooopid. When I finally picked it up, it took me two days top read, and about two seconds to decide to follow his advice.

    Now two weeks later and almost 5 kilos down, with virtually no exercise (a bit of walking which I was doing before I changed my eating habits) and never feeling hungry, I can see maintaining this eating style for the rest of my life. I love food, and this new way of life means I can still eat exciting and delicious options. Best of all I feel great.

    As I’ve shared my news with friends, I’ve been amazed to see how many others are taking the same journey and having similar results. Whilst I too amd wary of a one size fits all approach, David Gillespie is truly on to something here, and I plan to live as long as possible and tell others how to as well.

    Thanks for highlighting this work and spreading the word – future generations will thank us all for their improved quality of life, of that I am sure.

    [Reply]

  • Sheree

    I am now 16 days sugar free and have a 6 month old baby. I wasnt sure if it would effect my milk supply and energy levels, but I have to say that I feel better than ever and have more milk than ever! Who would have thought…my little baby Polly is very settled too. I would love to read Big Fat Lies and find out even more honest advice.

    [Reply]

  • Kristy

    I have been sugar free myself for 2 months, and my 12 month old baby has never had sugar or high fructose foods. She is incredibly healthy, happy and well settled. We don’t buy commercial baby food (even the organic brands) as most are high in sugar (usually fruit juice/concentrated juice which is almost pure fructose).

    I feel my children will have a very different relationship with food as they grow up compared to my own. I grew up drinking and eating jelly, chocolate yogo, coco pops, biscuits and sugary cakes, and remember being hungry a lot of the time despite my well-stocked lunch box and loving parents. I was always an ‘eat all my easter eggs on Easter Sunday type of kid’, well and truly addicted from an early age.

    On a separate note, have you read the justification for sugar in children’s cereals on the Kellogs website?

    “Sugar in cereals — including kids cereals —contribute less than 5 percent of daily sugar intake. Yet it adds taste, texture and enjoyment to cereal, while encouraging the consumption of fiber, vitamins and minerals — essential nutrients that you and your kids might not otherwise get from any other meal…”

    Kellogs are telling the public that our kids are eating so much sugar anyway, that a little bit extra from their product won’t hurt…

    I can’t wait to read ‘Big Fat Lies’ and would of course love to win a copy!

    [Reply]

  • http://gustoso.wordpress.com/ Gustoso

    I’m a big fan of David’s first two books. I’m hanging to read his new book.

    I’m currently trying very hard to kick sugar and carbs at the moment, but struggling. They are so pervasive. I’m also trying to avoid MSG and Aspartame – which is hidden in so much processed food. Talk about addiction.

    Have you seen “Fat Head” documentary? I love the way he explains that fat and cholesterol don’t cause heart disease. (I just wish he hadn’t used Maccas)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8WA5wcaHp4

    [Reply]

  • Mona

    I have lost 15kg on a protein diet. It seems obvious to me that if fats were so bad for us and made us fat I would not be able to lose weight while eating it. Even after losing the weight I have friends that would say I am wrong. Sugar is additive and you only have to look at your own response to sugar to see that when you come down from the high you reach for more sugar. I strongly believe that most of what we are told is motivated by someone making money. They lie to us because it is profitable to do so and when we get sick they will profit again by selling us drugs to make it all better. We need to stop believing so blindly in what they sell us. How many times have they said it is safe to have this drug or this food only to ban a couple of year later. We are being used like testing subjects.

    So glad to see some is able and willing to go against the grain and educate us on the truth. It make sense……Thanks and I too would love a copy of your book.

    [Reply]

  • Jessica E

    Hi Sarah,

    My Dad just had a heart attack last night. He had Angina abou 10 years ago and has eaten low-fat ever since. It is obviously not the answer!!

    This event has me questioning what me and my partner eat, and I woul love a copy of the book to be better informed. I feel very influenced by the consensus which seems to exist stating that low-fat is best, and it still feels ‘naughty’ eating full-fat. However, low-fat is no guarantee of unclogged arteries and I am desperate to find a better way!

    [Reply]

    Jess Reply:

    Jessica I share your concerns. My mother has high cholesterol, her father has had serious heart problems, and his father died of a heart attach at 40. The problem is my mother now believes she needs to go on statins and follow a low fat vegetarian diet to help her.

    I like to point out to her that her father and grandfather both smoked heavily and had very stressful jobs (not to mention following a virtually no fat high carb/sugar diet for the last 10 years)- which have no doubt contributed to their health problems.

    A difficult issue!

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Hey Jess,

    If you want some really good info on cholesterol (and why it’s not as bad as it is portrayed), go to chriskresser.com and search “chris masterjohn” – he has done 3 podcasts on cholesterol and health – very informative, but also quite sciency, so have your pen ready! Also, Chris Masterjohn’s site cholesterol-and-health.com is very helpful. Maybe direct your mother to these sources of information – if she is anything like my family, she will only change her habits if she educates herself, rather than having her daughter tell her what to do. It is SO hard to get your family to change!

    [Reply]

    Jess Reply:

    Thank you kate, I will definitely direct my mum to these sites, I’m looking forward to having a look at them myself :)
    Unfortunately many GPs stick to their conventional theories and don’t bother to read any of the recent research.

    Thanks again!

  • Tracey S

    Hi Sarah,

    Thank you so much for your courage and information!

    My children attend a public school in NSW in a reasonably affluent area. The food served in their canteen under the guise of ‘healthy’ is appalling! I have discussed this with the principal with no actual beneficial results.

    Are you able to provide an article on the amount of sugar and processed fats that are allowed to be served in a school canteen to children. I personally feel that it is a form of child abuse on behalf of the government, education system and food manufacturers to be allowed to serve and market ‘junk’ food to our precious children in an environment where they should be protected and educated.

    [Reply]

  • Sophia

    I’ve always had a weakness for the sweet stuff, which includes having been a big fan of cereal (always “healthy” granola, but I know now that doesn’t really mean much) for breakfast and midnight snack. After reading this blog, I’ve started to fight my sugar addiction and having things like scrambled eggs for breakfast instead. But I’ve run into something interesting- I’m living in France for a year as an exchange student, and every French family I’ve stayed with eats a similar breakfast…Toasted baguette with jam or nutella or some other sweet spread, fruit juice, and sweetened coffee/tea/hot chocolate. That’s the basic model, but I’ve even witnessed someone have a couple chocolate biscuits and a cup of coffee for breakfast. Everyone thinks I’m strange to want to eat protein first thing in the day. Anyway, thank you so much Sarah for introducing the danger of my sugar habit to me, and I would love to be in the running for a copy of David’s book!

    [Reply]

  • Shelley W

    I am beginning to realise that the more I know, the more I need to know. There is such an enormous amount of information out there. In the past we blindly trusted what we were told. Not any more. I am so pleased that there are people out there who are sharing the truth behind all of this information with us. My eyes are being opened more and more each day!

    [Reply]

  • Vicki

    Mmmm it’s only 11am and but I could totally eat that Chorizo, what looks like parmesan and bluberries! Must have it tonight when I catch up with my bestie on the eve of her daughter’s first birthday, with a cheeky glass of vino (I quit sugars says a little is ok right??!) and be free of guilt! And be free of wanting to drink the whole bottle and follow it with mounds of chocolate and dessert! Sigh, that’s my idea of an enjoyable existence.

    [Reply]

  • http://nutritionbynature.com.au/ Nutrition by Nature

    Hi Sarah,
    I’m a Nutritionist-in-the-making myself, and I blog regularly about Nutritional Medicine. I’ve made it pretty clear I don’t stand by ‘politically correct’ dietary ideas and basically promote a Weston A. Price-style nutritional philosophy. Whole, beautiful, saturated fats and all.
    I think you’d be surprised (and pleased) to know that we are taught both sides of the whole fat debate, that there has been a bit of a ‘cholesterol con’ going on, the dangers of refined, polyunsaturated vegetable oils and also the health implications of too much fructose and poorly prepared grains. I know that there are plenty of Natural Therapists out there pedaling these truths, and there are certainly whole classes full of up-and-coming practitioners with the same knowledge. Perhaps it is a little unfair to criticize an entire profession with such a sweeping generalisation.
    Kate

    [Reply]

  • Aimee

    I have Hashimoto’s, adrenal fatigue and insulin resistance. I have been struggling with this for two years and have tried all sorts of things to help me esp. with the fatigue. I thought myself to be wuite knowledgeable about diet before but really I wasn’t. Last year was a very difficult year for me as it was thought that I may have also suffered a stroke. My partner and I overhauled our diet, but I struggled with all the things I couldn’t eat. I find it hard when we are told what NOT to eat as opposed to what we CAN. I was following an insulin resistance diet, but kind of paleo as well. As a newbie to this lifestyle I have to say it was terrifying to venture into such a strict world of CAN’Ts. I oftened struggled to eat well as we are on a tight budget. A year on, we have a much better grip on it but it was so terrifying. I find David Gillespie’s books and your blog have really assisted me with the sugar and giving me ideas on what I CAN eat and how to figure out the labels. I find the hype and misleading information of healthy foods (ie. mueslis/cereals) truly frightening and am grateful that I can stear my young kids away from the crap now and not later. Thanks for that!

    [Reply]

    Ele Reply:

    I hope you win a book Aimee.

    [Reply]

    Aimee Reply:

    awweee.. thanks Ele!

    [Reply]

    seeker Reply:

    Hi Aimee,
    I found Lee Holmes book: Supercharged Foods really good – it is really positive and makes the ingredients you CAN have exciting and “enough” … I love food and don’t feel I am compromising a thing when I cook from this book, (and I don’t even have an ai!) All the recipes are sugar, dairy, gluten, wheat and yeast free, along with an eating plan to help you to kick start a new routine.
    I think she’s done a great thing here – and hope it helps you & all those suffering to feel better. :)

    [Reply]

    Aimee Reply:

    Thanks Seeker! I have been pining for her cookbook and I actually won one this week! I will pick it up next month. I soooo cannot wait. I think it is just what my family and I need! Everything looks so yummy!

    [Reply]

  • Laylach

    Oh, how I want a copy of David’s book – for my 12 year old son!!

    He is gluten, dairy and sugar intolerant with ADD and hates the “diet” i have him on (even tho his ADD symptoms have improved dramatically, he has lost weight and his school work is better) as his friends take the micky. I have been reading bits of your blog and other websites to him about real nutrition and thought I was finally getting somewhere. Until he started high school, took food tech classes and their first homework assignment was to find the food pyramid as the teaching for the whole year would be based on it – urrrghhhh! He came home and said “see mum, you’re wrong!”.
    I am sure David would have way more clout then me!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.mslimalicious.com Mademoiselle Slimalicious

    I think eating healthy should be a NATURAL thing. The most processed a food is, the worse it is for you (cooking and processing lead to ingredients losing their nutritional value, addition of preservatives, additives, added sugar, trans-fat etc.)
    All of this should be common sense and should be taught to us my OUR PARENTS, from generation to generation. Not by nutritionists.
    I’m very glad in France people still widely understand the importance of fresh products and quality over quantity. To me, junk food is repulsing, and the money junk food industry makes (while hundreds of thousands of people are struggling to eat every day in countries like Somalia) is even more more repulsing.

    [Reply]

  • Addy Jess

    SARAH!!!! who is paying YOU?????? and better still what are your qualifications? I think you should get down from the high horse you are on and take a look at some of the companies you are a giant advertorial for who owns them and who invests in them! I have been watching this column being horrified at some of your recommendations due to just how ludicrus they are. Without any formal qualifications…you are potentially putting peoples lives in danger. And to be frank not making to many friends in certain sectors in the process.

    [Reply]

  • Andy

    Horrified by this nutritionist’s advice this morning (Alan McCubbin from Next Level Nutrition). Sultana Bran for breakfast every day as part of a weight loss diet:

    http://sheridescycling.wordpress.com/2012/03/09/thinking-positive-about-nutrition/

    Sarah, your reaction please?

    [Reply]

  • Michelle

    An engaging comment…..? I’m too tired to be engaging….lol. I just really want the book so I can help myself get healthy again. :-)

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    I have already commented above about how as a holistic nutritionist I find this quite offensive. I just wanted to add Sarah, that I have actually recommended to many hundreds of clients that they should buy your e-book. (I don’t agree 100% with what you say, I would never recommend that someone gives up fruit unless they have a salicylate sensitivity), but the point is.. I don’t think I’ll be referring any more clients this way!

    [Reply]

  • Nina

    Amazing Sarah! what low’s you will stoop too next! why dont you go get some qualifications and find out that we ‘Nutritionists’ dont all get paid by cereal companies nor do we warn people off fat! quite the oppoiste infact, but i guess your ego is now bigger than your common sense. You have over stepped the line with this post and walking a fine one at that. As for accepting money, take a look in your own back yard.

    [Reply]

    Anon Reply:

    Nina you’re kind of aggressive and annoying. Sarah is always completely transparent about her endorsements.

    Call me old fashioned, but I am far more likely to take seriously the advice of someone who doesn’t seem to have completely missed out on the spelling, punctuation and grammar component of their education.

    [Reply]

    Nina Reply:

    Sarah, transparent, really? Nice try anon – deflecting from the reality of Sarah’s lack of qualifications in giving advice on the WWW, she simply regurgitates from other experts, but its not enough to over come the fact she is simply a journalist with an over inflated ego

    [Reply]

    Sol Reply:

    Bullshit Sarah is transparent. Take a look at the flash car Jeep “loaned” her. I sure her new Vitamix wasn’t paid for, the free trip to NZ she recently blogged about and the list goes onnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn. No wonder she bangs on about buying as little as she can – she doesn’t pay for anything!

    anon Reply:

    Actually Sarah stated quite clearly that the trip to NZ was given to her.
    And I have no idea if there are kickbacks from sale of David’s book etc.

    Bear in mind that these are just opinion pieces, Sarah talking about her views and experiences etc with references and links to experts. She says at least twice to ‘make up your own mind…’

    HOWEVER I do completely understand why nutritionists and dietitians are upset about being bunched together as liars peddling misinformation and being paid off for it (and God knows I”m not inside her head but I kind of read it as meaning the ones attached to the peak nutritional bodies and major food companies, not all nutritionists and dietitians in general)
    I think Kate’s response further down is really articulate and heartfelt and probably has greater impact than the insults and hostility that are the impulsive response.

    I think if Sarah was trying to generate a heated conversation, she has achieved that, but I do hope she responds soon.

    Muz Reply:

    By the sounds of you ‘anon’, you are Sarah writing that reply 10/3/12 505pm!
    nice work but really…

    anon Reply:

    Oh my God , you are hilarious “Muz”. What’s to say you aren’t Sarah either?

    I don’t think sarah would ever hide behind ‘anon’, she doesn’t seem to be as afraid of her commenters as I am.

    I am a regular contributor but used anon because I’ve been attacked one too many times under my own name.

    I sure ain’t Sarah though.

    Lisa Reply:

    I’m with Maz on this. If it’s not Sarah then it’s one of her inner circle, yet again trying to put out one of her many spot fires. And you don’t think she is afraid of her commenters? My god, you are very naive also. In this article alone she has managed to upset and anger two whole professions. Why hasn’t she come back online then to either defend her argument or set the record straight? Cause she has no f*cking ideas of her own. As someone else said, everything she writes about are simply ideas other people have developed. Hope she is charged for copyright.

    And yes, I am a Dietician also.

    anon Reply:

    What the f**k is wrong with you people?

    I have never met Sarah in my life, I do not know her, I am not one of her inner circle and I was acknowledging that she must have upset you for God’s sake!!!!!!!!!!

    And by the way Lisa, its “Muz’ not ‘Maz”. Like I said, you all seem to have spelling issues. Now piss off.

    Lisa Reply:

    “Attacked one too many times under your own name” – gee, I wonder why!!

    Perhaps try an anger management course.

    anon Reply:

    It all started so politely, but I ended up just mimicking your tone Lisa.
    Try looking up h-y-p-o-c-r-i-t-e in the dictionary.

    [Reply]

    Lisa Reply:

    Anon, you are retarded.

    anon Reply:

    A really witty, well thought out, politically incorrect reply Lisa.
    Love your work.

    Jacqui Reply:

    What I’m confused about is why so many people post hateful messages and clearly disagree with most of the ideas Sarah brings to the table, and yet continue to read this blog. Personally I wouldn’t waste me time.

    [Reply]

    amyer Reply:

    I agree! Make love, not war, people!

    [Reply]

  • Teri

    I am so glad you have this website. It is such a wealth of information and a “go to” guide for me. I frequently want to argue my case for my choices of good food (I am considered quite a freak by some). Unfortunately, even though i know i am making the right choice, i have difficulty explaining to these folks just WHY it is right. i cannot rattle off the statistics or truth on the issue and end up quietly eating my avocado and quinoa without much of a ruckus. i really would like to become adept at arguing my case…every little bit helps. thanks for giving me some material to work with.

    [Reply]

  • Ginny

    Moreover, there is too much operating with tunnel vision – the right hand not knowing what the left hand is doing. Ignoring the interdependence of our bodies (all systems and sub-systems) with our intake (Rx, food, pollutans, exercise) and our environment leads to incorrect and incomplete conclusions for which we all suffer. The emerging field of epigenetics gives some hope in that we are not locked into a predetermined genetic destiny; lifestyle changes can and do help.

    [Reply]

  • http://mummalu.blogspot.com Lucy

    I almost had a punch on with the poor sample lady at one of the major supermarkets a few weeks ago. She was determined that the Milo breakfast cereal was “healthy” and that we must try it. She had it down pat with her “facts” about all the fantastic vitamins and minerals and I think she also truly believed in what she was trying to sell.

    This would be a fabulous book to share with many of my friends out there!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.addie-n-emee.blogspot.com Kelly

    I would love a copy of this book!

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    I have already commented before, but I thought I would explain it like this..

    Imagine that you spent 4 years studying accounting. You had the option of working for a huge international firm (and getting a big fat pay check) but instead you set up a little suburban practice to help people with their tax refunds. You don’t make much money but you feel like you are helping average people save money and try to get ahead with their finances, so you are happy.

    There is a website that is run by a woman (Let’s call her Sarah) who is not an accountant, and has no training in accounting whatsoever, but she provides helpful little tips on saving money. You quite like her website and often refer clients there to read posts (to help explain what you have been trying to teach them about saving money.)

    So far so good.

    Then one day, Sarah writes a post that is titled “All accountants are lying to us” and you are a little annoyed. All you do is try to help people and you agree with many of her ‘money saving tips’.. Why would she write that?

    Then she goes on to say that “It’s a fact.. all accountants are paid by the government to try and make you pay more taxes”. And, now you are pretty damn furious. You have never received any money from the government at all. You have just ticked along in your little office in the suburbs trying to do the best you can to help people with their financial goals.

    You have known of huge organisations being paid by the government, but out of all the accountants you studied with, all the ones you are friends with, all the ones you have worked with.. not a single one is paid by the government.

    So, now you are upset.. why did you refer so many people to her website? You are puzzled.. Why would she write such nonsense? You are hoping that she makes a public apology to accountants everywhere and changes the title of her post. You also hope that it does not affect you business, because you were just a little fish in a big bowl trying to do the right thing for people.

    [Reply]

    Sol Reply:

    Perhaps this so called ‘Sarah’ person did acknowledge this the next day by writing an article titled ‘The Sh*t I Say’ without even realising the irony!!

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Writing an article the next day saying “sometimes I need to pull my head in” is not really an apology.

    [Reply]

    Sol Reply:

    You really reckon you’re going to get an apology?? Think hell will freeze over before that ever happens.

    AJ Reply:

    Nice work Kate, you speak fro us all, it seems Sarah’s desperate search to find an income stream that requires her to work as little as possible because of her ongoing battle Hashimoto’s has lead her to bite the very hand that feeds her, silly, silly girl. Interesting she get’s in bed with a dietician in one of her blogs so can’t be seen to label all dieticians as liars….mmm

    [Reply]

    Jacqui Reply:

    Geez guys, this is a BLOG, it’s about posting your IDEAS, if you want cold hard facts peer reviewed and based on years of study then read a journal article. This is the internet, if you’re offended by this and feel you need an apology over THIS…I advise you to turn off your computers now.

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Jacqui, I not not offended by Sarah’s ideas, as I said above I agree with most of them. I am offended that she labeled all Nutritionist’s as deceitful and I think that this is very damaging to an entire profession (my profession).
    Imagine if I had a blog (that thousands of people read) that said ‘It’s a fact: all former television presenters are idiots’
    This has nothing to do with facts or idea’s..It’s a damaging and hurtful comment.

  • Greg

    Virtually eliminated sugar from my diet has made a huge difference for me. I used to have severe sugar cravings 3 or 4 times a day. It was not pretty. The day I quit sugar was the day I stopped suffering from sugar cravings. I do have a bit of sugar now and then but never in the morning. Now that my appetite levels are under control I feel a lot calmer than I used to feel. I felt stressed out all the time and ate sugary food to combat the stress. Now I think that the sugar made me feel stressed in the first place. It’s so nice to feel calm and to not be hungry all the time. Since I changed what I am eating I have been losing 2 kg every month. Not bad for not dieting and never feeling hungry.

    [Reply]

  • Theresa

    Check this out for a bit of balance.
    Not saying that Sarah and David Gillespies anti sugar crusade
    Is misinformation, on the contrary it is probably spot on…

    http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/frequently-asked-questions/fructose

    [Reply]

  • Kristy

    I followed the advice from Nutrition Australia. I ate a ‘moderate’ amount of sugar, etc (see Theresa’s link) and got fatter and fatter. Recently I read Sweet Poison and then Sarah’s IQS. Now the weight is dropping off rapidly and … I feel great.

    Just saying.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.bricksandbaubles.com Ashley R

    I have not quit sugar yet, but my family is close. We have cut out all processed sugar, and we don’t have it available to add to food anymore either. We are not working on getting rid of the sneaky sugar. We have become aware of the low and no fat myths meaning there is probably way more fake stuff and sugar- a bad trade from the natural FOR SURE!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.bricksandbaubles.com Ashley R

    Obviously our nutrition in America must be wrong, because the food pyramid does not work!
    I have not quit sugar yet, but my family is close. We have cut out all processed sugar, and we don’t have it available to add to food anymore either. We are not working on getting rid of the sneaky sugar. We have become aware of the low and no fat myths meaning there is probably way more fake stuff and sugar- a bad trade from the natural FOR SURE!

    [Reply]

  • Theresa

    Re Kristy
    That’s great that you cut back on sugar and lost
    weight. I have cut back too and feel better for it but the point I want
    To make is that maybe we are being a bit fanatical about it all.
    People like myself, can eat moderate amounts of sugar and not be overweight and/or unhealthy. I am active though, I surf and walk.I think we need to acknowledge the fact that the research that Dieticians and Nutrition Australia do is founded in science and chemistry.
    To be a dietician you have to be exceptionally good at chemistry.
    After reading Nutrition Australias review of David Gillepies book I don’t know if I’m fully convinced by a lawyer (and a journalist) that I need to totally quit sugar.
    I’m keeping an open mind til more evidence comes in that is backed by a dietician
    Just saying.

    [Reply]

    rachel Reply:

    so the 1000+ (and counting) articles that have been released pointing to evidence that sugar is bad isn’t enough for you? Just because you are within a healthy weight range, it doesn’t mean that you are automatically healthy yourself. Sugar does damage and puts strain on the liver as well as other organs and you won’t see that damage until years to come.

    I don’t care whether David Gillespie is a lawyer or dietician or whatever. At least he has the courage to stand up and say “hold on a minute, something’s not right here”. He knows that he hasn’t studied nutrition, but what he HAS done is researched many articles from real scientists, alarming articles, and put it in a format that we can understand. So to dismiss David and Sarah’s work because they have not studied that field is sweeping the truth under the carpet. In time you will see – the truth is starting to surface, much like tobacco 50 years ago, and change will happen eventually.

    unfortunately, because sugar is so addictive is a very good reason to quit it. You can’t be “moderate” when it comes to something that is just as addictive as tobacco or cocaine. If it’s not addictive, why the resistance to quitting? It’s because it’s a very hard decision to make and a lifestyle adjustment, plus there is SO much money to be made from out addiction to sugar that of course there will be groups that are against Australians going cold turkey. If you think you aren’t addicted, then what’s the excuse to not cut out something as nutrient dense (if fact it takes away nutrients from your body just to process sugar), such as sugar from your diet?

    Also, be careful with the word “moderation” because it’s different for everyone. I see moderation as once a month or more, but others see it as every day. “moderation” is such an unhelpful terms because it equals to “I don’t want to think about it”.

    We need to go back to basics and away from processed foods (fructose was so rare in our hunter-gatherer days that it wasn’t a problem back then), and sugar is the most processed of all. It’s hard to get away from the stuff. Why not try getting away from it too, limiting your fructose to less than 12 grams per day for 6 – 8 weeks, increasing your vegetables and legumes intake, drinking plenty of water, eating only wholegrains and good fats, and see how it makes you feel?

    [Reply]

    rachel Reply:

    * sorry, I mean that sugar is nutrient deficient.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.amodernhippie.com Andrea Merrigan

    I have not been a follower of your blog for long, but everything I’ve read has been wonderful! I would love to win a copy of this book:)

    [Reply]

  • SNEZANA

    I normally eat lean protein with vegetables on most days of the week. Are you saying that if l cooked my steak in butter l wouldn’t gain weight? I find this very hard to believe.

    Sue

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: But They’re Associated With …. The Ad Hominem and Poisoning The Well | David Gillespie's "Big Fat Lies"

  • Pingback: Win a Sugar Free Shopper's Guide » I Quit Sugar

  • Pingback: 6 reasons why nutrition science does our head in » I Quit Sugar