Want to learn more about the Paleo diet? This is for you…

Posted on March 23rd, 2012

There’s much buzz at the moment about the Paleo diet. Some of it painfully pious. Some of it fascinatingly valid. I’ve written a little about it here and shared some Paleo recipes here. I keep getting asked to share my thoughts, and am often asked by recent sugar-free converts, “should I be quitting all carbs?”

Photo by Lee Blaylock...a stylist I'm working with!

To be honest, I’ve been reluctant to wade into things too much because I’ve been experimenting with this way of eating myself, and forming my own opinion slowly. I don’t like to opine until I’ve tried and researched.

But recently the big names in the Paleo movement got together for an online Paleo Summit. I mention it because I think it’s possibly the best overview of the science, techniques, controversies and so on behind the thinking and it certainly helped me get to the bottom of what the eating approach/lifestyle is all about. Some of the names on the lineup you might recognise from on this blog (Chris Kresser who I’ve interviewed here, and Nora Gedgaudas who I interviewed here.)

For those of you who’re interested you can get the package of podcasts and videos and other bits and pieces here. Those of you who have noooo idea what I’m talking about…next week I’ll be doing a bit of Paleo 101 rundown. Tune back in.

Meantime, some of the more interesting guff that’s ticked off at the Summit:

How to do the Paleo dance with kids and a family

Are some carbs OK to eat? Nora Gedgaudas’ presentation is friggen great. She argues that no starches are safe. Others at the summit argue some rice and sweet potato is cool…all the evidence is laid out in both directions so you can make your own mind up.

Does Paleo help with autoimmune and inflammation? Neurosurgeon Dr. Jack Kruse speaks about how leptin resistance lies at the root of inflammation, obesity, and chronic disease. He also shared how he lost 60kgs in a year. Dr. Thomas O’Bryan, a gluten sensitivity expert, gives the rundown on how allergies work.

How to Win an Argument with a Vegetarian. Denise Minger, Author, Death by Food Pyramid, is a legend. She breaks down the China Study argument…with facts. I’m not sure who points this out, but most people who eat this way eat more vegetables than a vegetarian.

How to make the switch to a fat-burning metabolism

Not eating carbs when you’re an athlete

But what about cholesterol? Chris Kresser’s chat is fascinating. Get anyone in your family who’s on statins to listen to this. Interesting he dispels the paleo line: “Hey, don’t worry, high cholesterol is fine!” It is indeed true eating saturated fat doesn’t cause heart disease and that eating saturated fat doesn’t cause high cholesterol. But high cholesterol can cause heart disease and can be a marker of a whole heap of other issues (including thyroid problems!). The best bit: at the end he gives a comprehensive outline of what to do next when you get a high cholesterol reading – exactly what tests to take etc.

What about constipation? And IBS issues? Dr. Allison Siebecker’s lecture is a whole load of “that’s me too” fun for anyone with gut issues, regardless of whether you want to cut carbs or not.

Why does Paleo see people lose weight?

Anyway. If you want to listen in, it’s about 18 hours of lectures (I’ve been listening to it on my ipod as a I drive) and it costs $US99, including a whole heap of flashing bonus things like the full transcripts, cookbooks and…steak knives…and….. You can get hold of the package here.

 

 

For next week’s post, anything you want me to cover off or answer?

 

 

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  • Alyssa

    I think it’s important to clarify that a paleo diet does not require one to quit all carbs. Fruits and vegetables are carbohydrates.

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    correct…and you can interpret as you feel it suits you…I eat sweet potato and pumpkin etc

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  • toni

    In regards to your next paleo post, just curious as to how you deal with the no dairy? I guess I would be considered paleo if I didn’t eat dairy, but after giving up sugar, all grains and then legumes, I’m hanging on to (full fat) dairy for dear life!

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    Claire Reply:

    Hahahaha Toni I am in EXACTLY the same boat.

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    Kate Reply:

    I’m the same – still having milk in my coffee, but have otherwise given up dairy. I think paleo is a bit like religion – lots of different view points. If you follow Rob Sisson’s view, which he calls ‘primal’, he’s OK with some dairy and legumes, for example. Since we’re all different, I think you just need to try stuff out and see if it works for you.

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    Kate Reply:

    oops! Mark Sisson, I meant!

    Rebecca Reply:

    Yes Toni, I can’t quite go that final step either.
    I love cheese, cream & yoghurt. And really don’t think I have any reactions to it either. But they say you won’t know that till you give it up for 30 days. But I just don’t know if I want to or should go down that path….

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    Angela Reply:

    me too! I’d probably give up Paleo if I couldn’t have dairy.I just need that variety. And I think if you don’t have problems digesting dairy, then why not eat it?

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    Jodie Reply:

    I was just about to make the same comment! I’ve cut out carbs and sugar but I’m still having diary. Does that matter? How important is it to give up diary? A personal choice like everything else? Or is there another way to look at it. I’d love to hear Sarah’s (and other people’s)
    thoughts on this!

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    Ivy Reply:

    I cut out dairy after being Paleo (and loving my cheese and heavy cream!) for 6 months. 1 weeks after cutting dairy all my intense seasonal allergies were gone, without medication! A month after quitting myw aist was smaller by several centimeters, and the pimples on my upper arms were gone. Even thoughd airy didn’t give me gut-issues, it obviously affected me across the board. Now I substitute with coconut milk.

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    Lauren Reply:

    If you can tolerate full fat dairy then enjoy your organic butter, full fat yoghurt and raw milk, some haloumi.
    Some people can’t tolerate lactose as they are deficient in the enzyme that breaks down the lactose molecule, so it can not be absorbed and passes through the digestive system and straight out-generally in a not very pleasant way!
    Lactose tolerance can actually be increased through dosage in some people, but their is a ceiling to this tolerance. Ethnicity is a factor in lactose tolerance as well.

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    Rebecca Reply:

    Hey Lauren, loving your comments here and below!
    Would love to have raw dairy, but can’t get it where I am (ass-end of world, otherwise known as the gorgeous Tassie), at least not raw milk. Can get the most divine raw cheese but VERY exxy.
    It’s funny though, here I am wondering whether to give up dairy, and made a paleo soup last night w/ Coconut milk, then had horrible bloating last night, and the ‘got to find a loo QUICKLY’ issue today. Don’t get that with dairy though. Mmmmmm

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    Ivy Reply:

    If you are “new” to coconut products, you often get a bit sick at first. I know tons of people who got very sick intially with coconut oil/butter/milk because it has such strong detoxing effects on the body, and because it is a good anti-fungal. Even though I’ve been having coconut products for 10 months now, there are certain brands of coconut milk that will make me feel very queasy and sick. Its normally the rbands that have weird things added, so try to stick to the Ayam or Aroy D-brands, they are nothing but coconut cream and water.

    amy Reply:

    ~Hey Rebecca where are you in Tassie? I am an hour from Hobart (Dodges Ferry)!! I have been told a certain farm may offer raw goats milk. I think its a bit out of the way though ha. I can give you the link to their website if you like. I haven’t personally tried it as I have a dairy allergy. If I could eat good quality dairy products I would, I think they are extremely healthy in their organic, raw state. So nutrient dense.
    Did the coconut milk have any guar gum or carrageenan added? These are renowned for irritating the gut.

    ~I like that this post mentions the idea of experimenting as after all its not about your diet being defined by ‘Paleo’, but what is healthy and works for you. After a year or so I am still tweaking. Carbohydrate intake from ‘safe starches’ and protein sources are what I still seem to be experimenting with. I don’t like eating too much meat, but am doing an autoimmune paleo appraoch currently which makes other protein sources limited. I would be interested on your approach to this.

    Fi Reply:

    I am not full paleo; the way I eat would probably be classed more as High Fat/Low Carb (HF/LC). I eat quite a bit of dairy but I tolerate it very well. Perhaps there’s quite a few milkmaids in my lineage? :)

    Sarah – I’m not sure if you have seen this particular presentation (I’m sure you have!) but it’s another fascinating presentation on modern dietary advice vs paelo type eating. It is 55 minutes long, but to be honest, the good Swedish doctor is not that hard to gaze at for nearly an hour :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSeSTq-N4U4

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  • Miranda

    Oh goodness Sarah – I am getting so confused! I have slowyl trialled a Paleo approach and it was doing me the world of good. But then I had to undergo the RPAH Elimination Diet and that restricted my fruit, vegetable, nut and meat intake to the very bland and boring and colourless fruit – pear and vegetables – think celery, choko, iceberg lettuce. Meat could only be fresh that day – chicken or beef or lamb – and I can only stomach chicken. Seafood could only be fresh caught and eaten that day and white only. It meant that my diet was so restrictive. I couldn’t have tea of any kind as it contains salycilates, and ws forcing myself to drink decaff coffee – yuck! I am an endurance athelte and now don’t know what on earth to do. In order to keep my IBS and fructose/lactose/gluten intolerances in check I have to limit the variety for a while, but eating is not an enjoyable experience for me – it really is a terrible nightmare – every morsal I put in my mouth I am waiting for the ‘reaction’. I dearly want to continue on the Paleo path as it seemed to do me such good, but if I never have to eat another piece of steamed chicken again I wouldn’t be sad about it. I downloaded the Integrative Health ebook the other day and I hope that I will gain some sort of empowerment over my body in order to heal it and then nourish it the best way I can. I think that I am emotionally exhausted from all of the eat this, don’t eat that, do this, not that lectures from all of the so callled experts.

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    Sarah Reply:

    I’ve been through the same diet and am currently in the re-introduction stage, I was miserable too. I personally found it easier when I noticed results and started to feel better, and once you get to the point of re-introduction, you slowly find things that you can add back into your diet and it gets easier. For me paleo is still not really possible as I am sensitive to salicilates and fructose.

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    Miranda Reply:

    Thanks Sarah – yes I struggle to be fully paleo too as I have such a restriction on fruits and vegetables, making it rather difficult. As an endurance athlete – running, swimming etc I find that I need to have rice cakes every so often too – they have no fibre which is good, but they do have some of the starchy carbs that sometimes the body just seems to need. In the paleo world that would be sweet potato, but that is a vegetable I can’t seem to eat.

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    Danielle Reply:

    Hi Sarah, I was just wondering how you went with the elimination diet, my 3 year old son has adhd and I have been advised to try the RPAH elimination diet with him but I am really hesitant to cut out the majority of his fruit and vegetables and instead give him white flour and sugar products. I’m wondering if paleo is a better option but i have been searching the internet for research studies done on diet and adhd and keep finding conflicting arguments. It seems from your opinion the paleo diet isn’t a cure all for everyone? I would appreciate any comments you may have.

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  • http://www.wholefoodhealing.com.au Brittany

    Is wine paleo!? Lovely picture though.

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    Lauren Reply:

    red wine is…as is clear spirits!

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    Ivy Reply:

    Paleo-gurus love the reservatol you get from red wine. And veryd ark chocolate. Its the perfect diet. :D

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  • Erin

    I would love to hear more on the carbs and IBS/constipation which you outline above. I can also hear myself saying ‘thats me too’!
    I am finding it all very difficult and confusing however. There are so many food bloggers out there now who cook up amazing food that is so healthy, flavorsome and whole. But the majority of them use a lot of the ‘trendy’ grains like Millet, quinoa, buck wheat etc.
    This is obviously completely NOT a paleo diet but certainly seems to be a growing sphere out there at present of using whole foods.
    I guess I am also left very confused. Whole grains or no grains?! Which is best?
    Have a great day. x

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    Angela Reply:

    If you have IBS, then I’d give no grains a go. I know,personally, whole grains are not good for my IBS. Since going Paleo I just don’t have any IBS anymore.The reason grains (even rice and gluten-free grains) are avoided in a Paleo is due to the toxins in them that aggravate our digestion and cause inflammation.I think whole grains are probably the most difficult for an IBS sufferer to digest.

    I still eat carbs – sweet potato and potato as I’m able to tolerate them. Often they are avoided because people want to lose weight. This diet,for me,is about feeling good, not losing weight.

    SInce doing Paleo(though not totally as I eat dairy), I don’t have the bloating,wind,cramping,and other discomforts of IBS. I think avoiding grain allows your gut to heal too.

    I hope that helps. Please give it a try – you’ll feel so much better.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I will cover this in my next post(s) on the subject…it’s a good one. The lecture on the summit is VERY good for anyone with IBS. Worth it

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    Marion Reply:

    I just had a look online and you can view a complimentary copy of the transcript for Dr. Allison Siebecker’s (Paleo Digestive Troubleshooting) presentation here: http://paleosummit.com/dr-allison-siebecker/

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    Lauren Reply:

    Erin, no grains is best. Wholegrains are now thought to be worse than mealed up white flour for example, as they cause more gut irritation, which is bad for everyone but especially for IBS sufferers. White rice is sometimes consumed by Paleo athletes as it is the MOST benign grain, that causes the least amount of inflammation of all the grains.

    I am a living proof that Paleo and no grains/legumes/dairy is the best treatment for IBS! My IBS was attrocious. I am Paleo for nearly 2 years and I have NO digestive issues at all! Nothing! It’s amazing and freeing!

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  • Ange

    What about eggs???

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    Lauren Reply:

    Eggs are amazing sources of protein and nutrients! They are perfect little heath balls!
    Just not every day, as that may create an egg intolerance. Few times a week should be right.

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    Jess Reply:

    Eggs are a massive part of the Paleo diet, its all about eggs, mostly because thats all you can eat for breakfast….lol

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    Tarryne Reply:

    Actually i dont completely agree. I do green smoothies for breakfast with my 1 peice of fruit allowance and flax/coconut oil. Works a treat!

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    Ivy Reply:

    If you do Rob Wolff’s Paleo AI-protocol youc an’t have eggs… people with leaky gut and AI should avoid eggs until they are healed.

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  • http://www.primalbody-primalmind.com Lisa

    There are many levels of Paleo as Nora G. talks about. (At the recent PaleoFX conference, Nora coined a term called the “Paleo Kinsey Scale” – for those of you old enough to remember the original Kinsey Scale related to sexuality) Paleo is not one thing, but a process. When I first started with Paleo, I cut out all sugar, bread and processed foods and eating quality protein, more organic veggies and healthy fats. Then I started tweaking my diet according to MY own needs and responses to food. Next on the chopping block was gluten (grains) and most recently dairy. I do some small amounts of sweet potato on occasion but it’s not a big part of my diet. If anything, learn to really know your own body….tweak your diet until it fits you. Nora takes the low carb approach to things but it’s because she has terrible genetics in her family and has to work like a dog to be healthy. And because she deals with the “metabolically deranged” every day in her clinical practice. The more you are metabolically compromised, the more careful you have to be with your nutrition. There is no one way for everybody. Paleo is a starting place and the finish line is ultimate health!

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    Lauren Reply:

    Well said!

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    Ivy Reply:

    Agree. personally I follow jack kruse and his advice… eating seasonal, going keto for 2 months over witner,a nd upping my carbs in spring, summer,a nd reducing it again in autumn. Its all about staying seasonal and eating what would truly be available locally at that time of the year. So far, so good.

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  • Leah

    I’m in week seven of quitting sugar and trying paleo was definitely going to be my next step! I’d love to know about quitting carbs and PMS. I find I have insatiable cravings for bread the week before my period. :)

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    Mel Reply:

    Hell yeah. I’ll be going great not a twinge of a craving then bam, I really want bread at that time. It used to be chocolate so it’s toned down a bit. But still it’s very hard to go a whole cycle.

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    Brittany Reply:

    I am the same and my Naturopath suggested having magnesium powder or tablets to help with PMS cravings, so have the tablets/powder one week before and the week of your period and the cravings should slow down..hope this helps!

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    Ivy Reply:

    Been Paleo for 10 months,a nd PMS is all but gone. Not even a sore crampy belly anymore.

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  • Kacey

    I’ve recently adopted some of the Paleo principles and it’s done wonderful things for me. What I’ve found really tough though is giving up lentils/legumes. I have big problems with iron and am conscious of getting adequate calcium (which lentils/legumes offer in abundance), and it was nice knowing I could use chickpeas, lentils or tinned beans as a convenient proten source in salads, curries, etc … especially when I wanted to ease up on the animal protein. Protein is also a challenge when you can’t eat dairy and don’t want to be hoeing into the usual suspects all the time (meat, eggs, nuts). If anyone has some tips I’d love to hear them!

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    Karen Reply:

    Second this, have revoked all legumes bar chickpeas which I absolutely love and am reluctant to give up. They are very nutritious too??

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    Lauren Reply:

    Hey Karen,
    I am a nutritionist & physiologist and would recommend you do your best to reduce chickpeas as they do still contain anti-nutrients, which attach to receptors and block them from receiving healthy nutrients, so it’s lose lose situation. Also they also can cause inflammation in the gut. The nutrients and protein in chick peas in much LESS superior than in meat, eggs, raw milk, organic butter etc.

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    tone Reply:

    lauren – refreshing to hear a nutritionist suggest those things, where are you based?

    Karen Reply:

    Thanks so much x

    Lauren Reply:

    I am in Melbourne. Yes there is a some mis-information coming from people in the field.
    It’ important to stay up to date with research and new studies, which not all people in the health industry do (don’t get me started on Weight Watchers!!!). Also some are not interested in developing ideas even if everything says they need to.
    Breakfast, I mix the following around:
    Eggs, spinach, avo
    Salmon, spinach, avo or vegies
    Bacon, tomato, avo, mushrooms, spinach
    Meat-chicken or beef mince is easier first thing with vegies
    Paleo pancakes with berries

    Kacey Reply:

    I thought so too Karen!

    Out of curiousity, what do you usually have for brekkie? (My trickiest meal of the day by far!!)

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    Karen Reply:

    I’m having a fresh veggie juice and a home made muffin made of almond meal, eggs, coconut oil, grated carrot or raspberry and a bit of stevia at the moment :)

  • Karen

    Also a bit confused about all of this! One very specific question, I use lots of almond meal in a semi Paleo diet but read that almonds should ideally be soaked and dried before eating. How does this work with almond meal? I am not sure my dedication will stretch to soaking, drying and ‘mealing’ large batches of almonds every week! Thanks :)

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    Lauren Reply:

    Almond meal is fine, but you should also look at Coconut Flour and include that in your cooking, it is high in fibre, and then you are not getting a huge dose of nuts every day (which are great but not a complete meal substitute).

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    Ivy Reply:

    Almonds are evry high in phytic acid, Omega6 and fat. I’d limit the use of it and move towards less foods thatr equire flours. You can make it an occassional treat though. :)

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    Karen Reply:

    Thanks both, have just bought some coconut flour so will be experimenting with that over the weekend!

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  • Ivy

    I’m glad you mention jack kruse, I’ve been follwing his work for 10 months, and once again, if you struggle with AI you should REALLY consider his CT-series and apply it… I have doen so for a month with some remarkable changes in health!

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  • Mary

    I would say that I eat the Paleo way and I do include dairy….raw dairy or at second best organic full fat dairy. There are no hard fast rules with the Paleo way other than work with what works with your body. If your body can tolerate dairy then go for it. It is truly an individual thing. This is the way that Mark Scisson from Mark’s Daily Apple looks at it and also Diane from Balanced Bites. Check these two guys out on the summit interviews or go to their web sites – full of great info :)

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  • http://www.definitivehealth.com.au tone

    so good to hear you’re promoting the paleo summit, put together by sean croxton from underground wellness. i’ve been following sean for 4 or so years now and encourage everyone to listen to his podcast on blog talk radio

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/undergroundwellness

    he covers A LOT of ground from both sides of the fence.

    the summit is a great way to listen to a diverse range of healthcare people – well done sarah for promoting

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    Mary Reply:

    Sean totally rocks :-)

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    Ivy Reply:

    I listen to Sean a few nights a week, love it!

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  • http://www.changeonewoman.com Tarryne

    Thanks for that Sarah. Iv been forwarding your posts to my mum for a couple months now (she has an autoimmune issue), and its been really interesting to see the response to the Paleo movement. Iv finally put my money where my mouth is and have been eating in a paleo way for almost two weeks. Shes watching with interest to see how i go before attempting it herself.

    The most surprising thing has been the sudden and totally amazing lack of sugar cravings. As a four cups of coffee with two sugars and a caramel slice a day person, its just crazy. I havent felt like sugar since day one. Although, as you say, its about what works for the individual.
    T

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    Kacey Reply:

    Totally agree with you about lack of sugar cravings Tarryne. it’s amazing! I’m far too embarrassed to admit how much fruit I used to eat every day (especially through pregnancy) and how much sugar in general controlled my life. Had a great laugh at Sarah’s comment in the IQS eBook about not being able to stop at one slice of cheesecake … undignified and uncool indeed!!! I’ve convinced my boss to try it out for IBS and hypoglycaemia. kicking sugar really can change your life. :-)

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    Tarryne Reply:

    Yup, sugars not a pretty beast. I used to do this awful thing where I would crave ready made cake frosting (yes, the american prepacked brand make exclusively from modfied soy and sugar) and i would sit with a teaspoon and eat the entire damn thing. I shudder to think of it now. While im lucky to have gotten away without any long term physical issues, I completely attribute having suffered depression when i was younger to a crappy sugar filled diet.

    ps, i fricken love cheesecake. Although i havent had it in about a year!

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  • Kate

    Beautiful photo, but… peas are a legume and not paleo! Mark Sisson is OK with them on his ‘primal’ variation of paleo though…

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  • Jedha

    Thoroughly agree, some of the content from the paleo summit has been awesome and very eye opening. Definitely heaps of info in there for people who are thinking paleo or even modified paleo :) Can’t wait to see what’s on the blog nest week :)

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  • Michelle

    Great timing Sarah as I’ve just been looking into paleo because of I have hashi’s and family history of gut issues. One question for everyone is that Robb wolf says that with autoimmune conditions you should also cut out eggs, nuts, tomatoes, and a few other things. I was wondering whether there is a consensus or not on that issue. His book is the first one I’ve read. I went on a few websites to look at what you can and can’t eat. Has anyone else noticed that some of these sites say diet soda’s are ok to drink. Does anyone else see that as strange? Love to hear your thoughts! Thankyou

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    Ivy Reply:

    I’d say a BIG NO-NO to diet soads… no good Paleos would drink that crap! I am healing leaky gut and have muchly done so without cutting out eggs or night-shades. but seeing the slow progress I’m ahving I’m thinking that I probably would benefit from following AI-protocol for a few months.

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    Michelle Reply:

    Thanks Ivy – that is interesting :)

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  • Brittany

    love this post Sarah and cannot wait for next weeks…I am slowing changing over to Paleo after quitting sugar but I am not in the right head space to also quit dairy so I would love to hear your thoughts :)

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  • prue

    I’m interested in what the best oils are to cook with. I know you say coconut oil or butter, but I can’t have butter, so would like to know what’s best when you don’t want that ‘coconuty’ flavour. Thanks!

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    Ivy Reply:

    Ghee. No lactose or casein, just clarified butter oil, also known as ghee. Doesn’t have much flavour either. I cook everything in it!

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    ms jane Reply:

    Prue I don’t tolerate coconut very well so I like to use macadamia oil. Delicious and safe to cook with.

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  • Mel

    Sarah or others, would you raise your children on a paleo diet or allow them to try an array of foods? I have been vegan for 2 years and, as the main cook in the house, initially cooked according to my dietry requirement/tastes. However, I am now very conscious about not about enforcing my beliefs onto my children and let them choose their own foods.

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    Ivy Reply:

    My youngest (16 months) has been eating Paleo since she started solids. She gets the occassional grain as a small bit of bun etc, but I really need to cut this out. She has my build and clearly my genetics. My biggest gift to her is health, so I will, as much as I can, ensure that she never needs antibiotics, never becomes a carb-craving sugar-monster, and that she finds joy in physical activity. I only cook Paleo-styled dinners, and my entire family eats what i serve up…. have done for 10 months. I should mention that my kids are often the only ones in kinder who doesn’t get sick with the latest bugs and germs. Fish oil, Vit D3 and paleo eating has really helped their immune systems.

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  • Mags

    Hi
    Looking forward to this, especially re cholesterol as I was recently put back on statins as my chol was so high and was told I was high risk of a heart attack. Scary enough for me to comply!

    Anyway, I read a lot about eating organ meat, which I find hard to take (even looking at/touching it turns my stomach – I bought it for my dogs but had to throw it out I was so nauseated!) Are there any tips for getting this in your diet? I do like pate, but that usually has a novel’s worth of ingredients that there’d be no benefits of eating it.
    Thanks

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    Mags Reply:

    Hah – Immediately after posting this I went to a website to order cod liver oil tabs and their banner advert was for organ capsules – for those who can’t stomach organ meat!!! What a co-incidence! So, has anyone tried these?!

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    Ivy Reply:

    I haven’t eprsonally, but I know heaps of people on the MDA-forum take liver-capsules. I made my own pate the other day… it wasn’t bad, but like you, I struggle. I also find sublingual B12 helps immensely with the need liver would normally cover.

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  • http://Www.jacquelineevans.com.au Jacqueline Evans

    Lucky you for attending Sarah. Am pleased lepton resistance was raised. An important biomarker that can easily be measured from serum. I am curious if there was any mention of the role of nutrigenomics in high cholesterol ???
    Thanks for your great articles

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  • Vicki

    Where are Sydneysiders buying their raw milk from? All my previous sources have stopped stocking it.

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    Claire Reply:

    Origin of Energy in Bondi. But you may find your other places will have it back soon, apparently the rain in qld affected stocks for a while. Happened last year too.

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    Louise (Table Tonic) Reply:

    Hi Vicky – abundantorganics.com.au sells it (“bath milk”) and they deliver Sydney-wide (I get my weekly organic order from them). You just have to order it a week in advance.

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  • ms jane

    Just wanted to say that I love the direction your blog’s going in Sarah. I know you’ve copped a lot of flak recently for your subject content but I’m digging it! x

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  • Lisa Ingram

    Ah, so many views. Me, I love to hear them all. Then give a few things a go. Felt very well as a vego for 20 years. Then added fish back in for the last 9 after that. Also feel great, and label myself a “fake vego” for those liking labels. Have tried no complex carbs – felt terrible on high proteiny things. Do much better on lentily chickpea foods, rye toast vegies of all colours and oaty things. Loved IQS and am slowly improving my choices here. Definitely never low fat anything, yuck, especially the fake slime called yogurt that isn’t. Enjoy vegan tendencies, but am not purist anything! I reckon eat what you feel well on with a nod to the planet. There is no ‘should’. Lisa

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  • Karen

    Another question has come to mind! I’m a member of a chiro community and we’re doing an 8 wk Alkaline Challenge to become less acidic, with a ph testing kit to see how we go. Have noticed that fish, eggs do make me more acidic which are staple paleo foods, even when balanced with lots of veg. All the alkaline cookbooks and websites seem to promote a virtually vegan diet…so how do the health benefits of paleo and those of an alkalinity promoting diet fit together (if they do?). Thanks in advance!

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  • Stephanie

    I have no plans to go paleo/cut out all carbs etc., but I am loving the direction of your recent articles. They’re balanced, informative and well-referenced. I’m glad I came back to check it out!

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  • Misa

    Hi I am new to this blog please can you write what do you think about yacon concentrate as a sweetener it is not syrup it s raw and they have written me that it has no fructose. I want to use it only here and there but just want to be sure it is better than raw honey lets say Thanks a lot

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  • http://streakofgenius.wordpress.com Samone

    Look forward to the paleo 101 piece, Sarah! I am interested in paleo but need to be more informed – so will also hit those links.

    I’m a recently diagnosed coeliac and it seems a natural step in lots of ways, as I still seem to ‘react’ to things like quinoa and legumes. My one concern is I am training for my first marathon and it feels counter-intuitive to limit carbs.

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  • Yvonne

    I would love to hear more about raw cacoa, and whether or not it is suitable for those with gut issues. Some of the reading I’m doing is suggesting it’s toxic (and bad for the adrenals)…so now feeling a bit confused.

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  • Anna

    What about chia seeds? Are these still good for us? Thx

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  • Anna

    Also, I just got into Quinoa over the last 6 months or so… and now Paleo says its no good. What are your opinions on this?

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