going gluten-free? some hiccups you need to know about

Posted on April 25th, 2012

Gluten’s got a grimy name just now. I’ve previously outlined my thoughts on going gluten-free (who should, why it’s not a “fad” etc). It’s worth a read if you’re a little unsure about the whole debate. If you’ve already made the move, or have contemplated it, then you might learn a lot from this rundown of the tricky things that might stump you in your tracks along the way.

image via food delights

Steph Osfield is a great freelance writer who used to write for me at Cosmopolitan eons ago and she sung out recently to say she’d had all kinds of dramas going GF and offered to share her thoughts. She and her family went GF due to broad-based health issues, not due to celiacs per se.  I very much appreciate what she outlines here. It’s clear, concise and has helped me with my own dance around the pesky little protein:

I was prepared to become a Lego Grand Master and tadpole wrangler when I became a mother, but I didn’t count on becoming a medical expert too. My gorgeous kids (son 12 and twin girls aged 10), have been sick so often over their young lives that our doctor says they are working their way through the medical dictionary. Whole terms often pass with only a week where they are all at school.

Our household ailments read like a medical dictionary; anaphylaxis to peanut, vulvadynia (stinging, sore vulva), multiple food sensitivities, a virus called molloscum contagiosum (four years and counting) and the last two years – nocturnal epilepsy and a sleep issue called periodic limb movement disorder. But in their younger years it was the eczema, glue ear and diagnosis of asthma that led me to take the quantum diet leap to a gluten free diet. Out went the rye bread and porridge and wholemeal pasta and in came the big surprise – we didn’t then live happily every after. Several weeks into eating gluten-free, health issues like their eczema got worse. So I become a foodie super sleuth and here’s what I learned about going gluten-free:

1. It’s not just gluten…

Corn, corn, corn – when you’re swearing off gluten, corn-based options like polenta and tacos shells and corn tortillas are usually on high rotation. Bear in mind that people sensitive to gluten are often sensitive to corn as well. If you do have this issue then increasing your corn intake may ramp up your health symptoms, which will then counter any benefits you might be getting from eating gluten free. This was the case with my kids.

Tip: Make up your own mix of flours for baking with tapioca, brown rice and buckwheat flour to avoid corn.

Here’s some other foods. You may also have a problem with:

* Salicylates: This family of plant chemicals are found naturally in high levels in many fruit and vegetables. Food examples: pumpkin, broccoli, capsicum, watermelon, strawberries, honey, tea and coffee.

* Amines: These result when protein is broken down by fermentation. Food examples: Cheese, chocolate, wines, beer, yeast extracts, bananas, avocado, tomatoes.

2. And it might not be the gluten…

You may be sensitive to the yeast or bleaches used in bread or the toppings you often put on toast – particularly if those toppings are high in amines and salicylates (see above). Tip: Change to yeast-free and unbleached bread before you cut out gluten altogether.

3. Soy milk can be a hidden source of gluten

A number of soy milks contain grains like barley, which contain low levels of gluten.  This means you may be unknowingly sabotaging your gluten free efforts with your soy latte or yoghurt.

4. Gluten sensitivity may affect dairy tolerance

This is because of damage to the villi and microvilli in the small intestine, which then can’t do their job of breaking down lactose effectively.

Tip: Try eating dairy again if you’ve been off gluten and dairy for a while and you may find that going gluten free has improved your tolerance to milk and cheese.

5. Going gluten free may make you constipated

Bread and cereals contain important fibre, they are also high in B group vitamins so eating less of them may leave you more prone to a sluggish bowel, low energy and depressed mood. [I get around this with slippery elm powder and by eating a lot of vegetables...also check out this post I wrote on stomach fixes - Sarah.]

6. Gluten sensitivity may not show up in tests

I had several tests that showed nothing and then several tests which did show elevated gliadin, which can be a sign of gluten issues. But you can have an intolerance to gluten even though nothing has shown up in a blood test.

Tip: You should eat least four slices of gluten bread every day for six weeks before you have any test over gluten issues. Otherwise, if you’ve been on a low gluten diet already the results of any tests may be inconclusive. This is particularly important if you are being tested for celiac disease (where the body has an allergic autoimmune response to gluten). Though a blood test may show obvious signs of this you still need a small bowel biopsy to rule celiac disease out.

7. Find your threshold

If you are sensitive to gluten you may be able to tolerate lower levels eg rye or spelt bread rather than wholemeal. Tip: Once you’ve been gluten free for a while do a tolerance test with a little gluten from a source like pasta or a health bread. You may find you can tolerate a little every few days or once a week without side effects.

If you’ve got anything to add, please do! 

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  • Ian

    You’ve been most generous taking the time to produce this level of detail Steph. It’s incredible how many mums (in particular) have had to become “medical experts/nutritionists”. I sincerely hope that all gets better with the kids. Ian

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    Hey Ian,

    Thanks so much for your lovely thoughts – it has been a very long road but I feel lucky that I had a great knowledge of health to begin with. I strongly believe that the cocktail of chemicals in everything from food to furniture is to blame for the epidemic of illness in children – combined with the high voltage way we all live which I think creates an incredibly stressed and rushed environment at home.

    My kids have had an incredibly health diet etc from the start but they have still not been well. Also, my twins (naturally conceived) who have most of the issues had a condition called twin to twin transfusion syndrome before they were born, where one got too much blood and the other too little from the shared placenta and I think this has largely contributed to their sensitivities. Then in the Intensive care unit they were placed on formula for their first few days without anyone checking with me even though i was breastfeeding – so that didn’t help. Though it has been hard for the kids, dealing with their issues has already taught them many helpful skills for life – from visualisation/meditation which we do daily to yoga to knowing how important it is to read labels, balance your diet and listen to your body.
    Take care,
    Steph

    [Reply]

    justjess Reply:

    Hi Steph,

    I had molloscum contagiosum 2 years ago which I caught from my waxing place (EEK!) and when I finally went to the doctor and she told me what it was AND that nothing gets rid of it, I was horrified. It looked hideous, I couldn’t believe there was no cure, I was 23 and I couldn’t live with these ugly things! I eventually tried (after months of google searches) Dr Wheatgrass recovery cream and recovery spray and also the supershots and within 2-3 weeks I could notice them healing and about 6-8 weeks they were all gone and have never come back. I don’t think it’s necessarily a miracle cure but I think maybe it helps your skin fight the virus better? Who knows, but it worked for me!

    Thanks also for such an informative article.

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    Hi Jess,

    Thanks for that. I confess I had to this point given up on topical applications because the issue is clearly systemic – ie that they have such low immunity to fight things off. So applying things to their skin puts out little brush fires but doesn’t get rid of the virus and with my tapping technique I do it without applying anything but my fingertips. The other issue with my girls is that their skin is so sensitive that they had allergic responses to every cream we tried – including a silver cream that we ordered from the US which has helped many others. However, I will pass on your info to friends who have a two year old who has just developed molluscum as I’m sure they would be very keep to give it a go = so thanks a million. Some beauty salons can be a bit of a germ jungle I fear!
    Molluscum really is a full-on awful thing and though doctors may say is it benign it can put people, particularly kids, at risk of serious secondary infections. Apart from the general discomfort and the oh-me-god it is spreading factor. I’m so glad to hear you have beaten it and thanks for taking the time to post about your wheatgrass – I will have a look into it.
    Steph

    Nikki Reply:

    Having suffered a life time of allegeries and the ramifications, i commend you on what an Incredible mum you are. Your children are blessed to have your foresight and intelligence Thank you for the research and experienced knowledge xx

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    Kaz Reply:

    Hi, for what its worth my two sons have had (are living with) contagium molluscums and the thing that worked for us (one son’s molluscums have totally cleared up and the other has only one or two stubborn ones left) is leon myrtle essential oil. We found a place online that sold pure essential oils and we neutralized it a bit in an olive oil base (as it was VERY strong and stung a bit initially). It seemed to be the only thing that dried them up and then they just fell off. They are unsightly and sore and annoying but they do go away eventually. Our GP suggested it can take up to 18 months. Good luck!

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  • Sarah

    I am sensitive to salicilates, amines, fructose and am having my celiac biopsy in July. Avoiding corn, soy etc is something I got used to and now it’s pretty easy for me to know what to eat and what not to eat. I am a bit worried about traveling though because it’s so restrictive. I’m going to Japan at the end of the year and don’t know where to go for advice., I can eat sashimi and nigiri but not everyday due to salicilates. Anyone had the same issue? Advice?

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    Jen Reply:

    Having just returned to Oz after seven years in Japan, the best advice I can give about dietary issues is to prepare yourself for continual struggle. Even in very urban areas, there is still very little awareness of dietary issues such as gluten or dairy intolerance. Staff in restaurants and shops often genuinely don’t conceptually understand the kinds of questions you may be asking about food contents, and there is limited willingness to adapt dishes for special requests.
    Not sure if you’re asking about what foods are available, or what kind of advice you want though.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Reply:

    thanks for answering! I was fearing that would be the case. If you have advice on anything regarding this, it would be amazing. Gluten free foods/restaurants, low fructose foods, low salicilate or amine foods, shops where you can buy gluten-free products? Health food stores, etc. I have been to Japan twice but it was before I developed these problems so I never needed to look for these places.

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    Hey Sarah,

    Not sure if this will help but it could be worth trying to contact the Aussie embassy over there in Japan – they may be able to put you in touch with some ex pats who are across this area or may be able to direct you to some stores or food chains etc.

    I know your pain – my sister lives in Malaysia but because of the peanut allergy of my daughter we are not able to travel there to visit – we just feel it would be too risky at this point and I figure if I take a holiday I don’t want to be stressed to the max. Travelling with food issues is such a stretch. Good luck with it all.
    Steph.

    Jen Reply:

    Hi again,
    Your access to products is going to depend a lot on your location.
    There are good foreign-food supermarkets in Tokyo, with limited ‘health food’ sections.
    Ordering online is probably going to be the easiest; Foreign Buyer’s Club (fbcusa.com) and Alishan (Alishan-organics.com) are both very good services. Alishan has a cafe, too.
    If you’re game, Rakuten is an eBay kind of website with anything and everything, but all in Japanese and very varied quality among sellers.
    Many supermarket home brands now have the major 7 food allergens marked
    on their product packaging, sometimes with a picture and sometimes with kanji. Regular
    brands don’t have this much though.
    I’d also advise you make a cheat sheet using Google translate and keep a list of the Japanese characters for your food intolerances in your purse so you can check ingredients labels, at least for the major stuff that will make you sick.
    If you’ll be in the Tokyo area, then I’m sure there are health food stores and restaurants to some extent, but even then it’s more likely to be ‘natural food’ focused than allergy or intolerance focused.
    Hope this helps a bit! Good luck!

    Sarah Reply:

    thanks so much for the advice!

    [Reply]

    Melanie Reply:

    Sarah, I just realised if you click on my name it will take you to my blog and you can get my email address through there if you want to contact me/compare notes before your trip.

    [Reply]

    Melanie Reply:

    Oh my Sarah, you sound just like me! I’m coeliac, and intolerant to salicylates, amines and fructose. In two weeks time I’m heading off for my second trip to Japan since being gluten free. I lived in Japan for six years (pre diagnosis) and speak the language at a functional level so on my last trip assumed that I would be able to wing it and get safe food.

    So my first piece of advice is to prepare! That trip was rather a disaster in terms of food.

    Things that were easily accessible – boiled eggs which you can buy at any convenience store were my breakfast staple – and you should be able to get them at most coffee shops for breakfast. Some sushi is fine, but of course seaweed and vinegar are amines so it depends on how sensitive you are. I’d have a some of the prawn sushi (with no seaweed), but be careful of wasabi – some contain gluten as I discovered…. The convenience stores also have lots of salads / vege sticks which have the dressing packed separately. There are some rice crackers made for babies that are gluten free as well as another brand that I lived on (I’ll see if I can find it again) that I’d by from 7-11.

    Outback steak restaurant and Tony Romas were great for preparing a delicious gluten free meal after I explained what I could and couldn’t eat.

    Be careful with “hamburg” – they are made with pork.

    Yakiniku is a Japanese (well Korean) food that you can eat if you ask for salt only (shio) and no sauce (tare nashi) (hoping my Japanese memory is serving me right there…) then you can order the meat and veges and grill away (making sure you have a fresh clean grill.

    What I’m doing for this trip is I’ve rented an apartment rather than a hotel – same cost – and I have a full kitchen. If you have access to a kitchen, the supermarkets are great as you can just eat lots of fresh meat/seafood and vegetables and rice. We’ll be taking packed lunches when out for the day (I’m taking my mum with me who is also coeliac). I’m packing (from Australia) some raw cashew nuts (only amine free nut), some fructose-friendly, gluten free museli bars and a couple of microwave meals for emergencies.

    I was really sad not to be able to eat my beloved Japanese food, but figured it was still great to be in Japan and experience everything else it has to offer.

    I’m not sure if you can contact me through these comments, but feel free to do so if you can. And I’d love to hear how you go and any tips you have for future visits.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Reply:

    omg I can’t even express how helpful this is. I’m going to read through this properly and take notes as well as check out your blog. I have found accommodation with at least a stove because I plan to cook for myself whenever I can and try to pack rice flakes, GF pasta and stuff, depending on what I’m allowed to take in my suitcase. I’m from Melbourne btw
    I will definitely take you up on the email offer too. Thankyou so much, I have been stressing everyday about this trip.

    [Reply]

  • Ms jane

    That’s interesting about corn. My go-to treat are plain corn chips. Bugger!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Might not affect you, remember. These are just things to look out for.

    [Reply]

  • http:fruitylemonade.blogspot.com/ Sue

    Thanks for sharing…..I am learning a lot from you.

    [Reply]

  • Lauren

    Wow – that has just totally solved all my problems. I couldn’t understand why I was still getting the occasional problems. Wish I had read this years ago! Thank you

    [Reply]

  • Kristi

    Thanks for this post. Very interesting and just reinforces the way our house is going. I have a 2 yr old that has been in pain and unwell since three days old. Finally after convincing my doc it’s not “normal” and finding a brilliant dietitian that specializes in children and adolescents, we have found that she has Cows Milk Protein, Soy, Gluten intolerances. She has mild intolerances to amines and sal’s also, however she can have minimum amounts daily. She is very slowly improving, but we have a long way to go. I would like to investigate further her obvious issues with certain proteins. Anyone have any further reading?
    Our diet is quite healthy albeit restricted. I’m a real home baker now! Quinoa, amaranth, rice, and all the lovely highly nutritious veg like brussel sprouts, cabbage, leek, etc are a staple in our diet now. And I believe we are better for it.
    Keep up the fantastic work Sarah. xx

    [Reply]

  • http://www.dressedtodeliver.com Tracy

    Thanks Sarah…very helpful info. I have been gluten-free for a few years and do know that corn and soy make me feel yucky…it has taken a bit of time for me to cut all of them out. When I’m tempted and eat them, I feel sluggish, hungover and grumpy (same goes for gluten). More and more I realize that it’s not worth it…I call that “the evolution of you are what you eat”! Interesting you mention honey. My four year old has had eczema since he was very young and I tried eliminating various foods (mainly dairy and sugar) and the patch on his face would always be there…for at least two years without it ever going away. Then I discovered, while on vacation, the patch on his face was no longer there. I was perplexed…what was he eating at home that he wasn’t on this trip? A week after we got home, I solved the mystery…it was honey. He’s had honey twice in the four months since that vacation, and that little red patch on his face pops up, otherwise it’s been clear for four months! Amazing! Thanks again for sharing your knowledge!

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    Hi Tracy,
    That’s interesting that honey – something that is often presented as a healthier alternative to sugar – was the problem. Because honey is higher in natural chemicals which do affect my kids we made a decision years ago to make the shift more to maple syrup which we’ve found has worked well – particularly to give a dash of sweetness to yoghurt, which they still find too strong in taste. We also found that tomato was a big trigger for eczema – eg a gluten free pasta with tomato sauce could bring on a bout but also when my twins were little, tomato led the one with peanut allergy to spend the next morning crying!

    Be a little bit careful if you move to sweeteners like brown rice syrup instead of honey as recent research, including a study conducted at the Children’s Environmental Health and Diseases Prevention Centre at Dartmouth college has found that it is a hidden source of arsenic.
    Your boy is lucky to have a mum so across his health,
    Steph

    [Reply]

  • Anthony

    I had a plethora of allergies and my autoimmune system had gone to the dogs. With a good diet and bioresonance therapy I cured my gluten intolerance and many of my allergies, though not all my allegies have been cured, it is a work in progress.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Bioresonance therapy…love to know more?

    [Reply]

  • http://www.brocantehome.net Alison at Brocantehome

    Thank you so much for this enlightening article Steph and Sarah, and I say that as a Mum of eight year old who was diagnosed with Celiacs, seven years ago after he almost wasted away while I banged my head against the brick wall that is the medical profession.

    Though Finley enjoys a strict gluten free diet according to the guidelines as I understand them, I have noticed that so called “safe” corn brings problems and we have still had to battle our way through more ailments than most children experience in one lifetime: from glands that swell up dramatically every six weeks or so, to water on the hip that left him unable to walk, sensory processing disorder, Kohlers disease and as you mentioned Steph, molloscum contagiosum, which lasted approximately three years and disappeared COMPLETELY overnight. I don’t think I will ever recover from the surprise…

    Anyway thank you again, for both highlighting other triggers and emphasising that the effects of gluten on the body go far beyond that described by many doctors.

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    Hi Alison,

    So sorry to hear about your many ailments with Finley – I know how absolutely exhausting it is – when they have that day to day level of health issues then even getting something little like a cold can feel like it will push you right over the edge. I’m so glad to hear your molluscum cleared up – people have told me of this occurring so I’m keeping my fingers crossed. I long for that overnight surprise!

    Interestingly, my son only got molluscum in one spot for three months but my girls, who are definitely immunocompromised are the ones who can’t shake it. In the end after trying every cure (including removing all the cores, which as you can imagine, was just awful), I did a whole lot of research and devised my own technique which keeps it at bay. Apparently the virus gives off very little electrical charge which is why it slips under the radar of the immune system so long. So when they get a papule now I tap their skin and this alerts the immune system and then their body deals with it so it does not become a fully fledged outbreak.
    I wish you son better health and make sure you take care of yourself too, – I know it’s so common for mums with unwell kids to be be operating in crisis mode and subsequently feel under the weather themselves most of the time.
    Steph

    [Reply]

  • Mel

    You’re moving?? Sometimes it’s good just to stay put & confront our fears. Definitely a challenge but also character building.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.livehealthysimply.com Jessica

    I’m not 100% gluten free but I like to keep it to a minimum. I eat yeast free, spelt bread and spelt pasta and this seems to be okay for me. If I ever have “normal” bread at a restaurant I always feel ugh afterwards – I know I should just say no but bread with olive oil and balsamic is too good to pass up!

    [Reply]

  • V

    Hmm this is making me think. Is there anything that we as adults can do to reduce the risk of passing this stuff on to our babies? Or not even passing it on – just limiting the chances of them being born with these food intolerances/allergies?

    [Reply]

  • http://jossieloves.blogspot.com Jos

    This is really useful but I think the biggest thing to take from this is work out what’s right for you and your body and health/ I have friends who’d read this and cut everything out from fear (and major head and body issues). It’s important to take things one food group at a time if you haven’t been diagnosed and give it a week or two to see if it makes a difference otherwise you could be restricting a whole bunch of food that is actually kind to you.

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    Hi Jo,
    You’re absolutely right – even medical science is now recognising that medications don’t all work the same way in people due to their very individual biochemistry and some people are slow or fast metabolisers with tablets which alters not just how big a dose they need but possibly what medication is best for them if needed (and obviously drugs best avoided if possible because they over-tax liver etc).

    I firmly believe that you need to listen to your body, try different strategies and discover what works for you. I am also a very firm believer in never cutting out lots of foods or food groups if you can help it. I think the more you reduce in your diet often the more reactive you may become. Some people call this ‘un-masking’ where you are actually now seeing the real reactions to the sensitivity but I’ve seen people reduce and reduce the amount of things in their diet until they can barely eat anything but don’t feel any better at all and in fact often seem to be getting worse. Meanwhile the getting the food right has become such a huge pressure that it really does not serve them.

    With my kids and their sensitivity to amines and salycilates, it is all about threshold – so if we had tomato today we would not have something like broccoli with that meal and then I would go for a much lower chemical round of meals tomorrow. Balance is the key. Years ago I interviewed a woman called Petrea King, who was not expected to live long but managed to cure her own leukemia and now runs the Quest For Life Foundation, where she helps people with cancer or chronic illness and their families live well. Interestingly when she was trying to get better Petrea went to a monastery in Italy for a year, where she ate what she was given, which included meat – something she had sworn off for a long time – particularly while trying to heal her body. After that period she went into remission.

    This leads me to the other big food sensitivity issue – STRESS! If you are very stressed and live life on the run then I strongly believe that your body responds by becoming reactive to foods that it normally wouldn’t have been affected by. Science also bears out the physical impact on stress which changes levels of hormones like cortisol and insulin, so it’s unsurprising that being uptight all the time impacts on everything from digestion and nutrient uptake to how your body responds to different food proteins and other food components. Reducing stress and living life at a slower pace (as Sarah often suggests) is I believe, an important element of food sensitivity.
    It’s so good that you’re on the ball and aware you need to find what works for your body.
    Steph

    [Reply]

  • Brittany

    Bless you, bless you Sarah for featuring info on food chemicals on your blog!

    As I saw Steph mention glue ear, asthma and excema I was prepared to shout about salicylates.

    Sarah I would LOVE to know if you have any experience with this area of food intolerance or have done the RPAH elimination diet. There are strong associations with salicylates, amines et al and Auto Immune conditions like CFS, ulcerative colitis and adrenal issues.

    In some cases it is necessary to start off very restricted (chicken or white fish and sushi rice) and then slowly increase foods, but it is so worth it.

    Love Britt

    [Reply]

  • Michaela

    Hi Sarah,

    Please can you make post about what you eat for breakfast lunch dinner? I have your book, but would like to know your actual food journal:-)

    Also have you heard about Dr Jack Kruse he is neurosurgeon and does great blog about leptin. He also says that when someone is not leptin sensitive can not fix thyroid issue. He also suggest never skip breakfast that will make cortisol even higher and stress body more. I was not eating my breakfast and did IF till noon so I guess I have to do it differently cause I have craving and it has to do with leptin

    [Reply]

  • Martina

    Thanks for posting this!
    I had a colonoscopy and endoscopy earlier this year as I had been having a number of tummy and bowel issues for the last year. It progressively got worse and worse so I had to do something about it.
    As Stephanie kindly points out, you need to eat a fair bit of bread for this to show in these results. And because my stomach had become so bad I could not do it.
    So my results did not show celiac’s. And because the results didn’t show anything at all, its IBS (the disease when they can’t pin an actual disease to your ailments).
    I have been going gluten free for some time now and I struggle with gluten free options. Last week I had a gluten free pizza that was a corn base and I was sick for 2 days afterwards.
    Even fruit upsets my stomach so now I steer clear of it.
    All of these changes at the age of 26 have come as a real shock and have been quite hard to accept. The hardest thing to accept is that a year ago I was normal.
    And I think a good thing to point out here is that everyone on a gluten free diet because of gut issues should be taking a really good pro-biotic (BioCeuticals is the one I recommend).

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    Hi Martina,

    Have you heard about the fodmap diet? Monash Uni has done work on this and it has been studied and reported on in medical journals. Dr Sue Shepherd developed the diet in 2001 and has had great success in helping people with IBS: shepherdworks.com.au/disease-information/low-fodmap-diet.

    The Fodmap diet is all about
    Fermentable Oligosaccharides (eg beans)
    Disaccharides (eg milk)
    Monosaccharides (eg pears and corn)
    Polyols (eg foods like apples and mushrooms).

    Some people poorly absorb fodmaps. As a result they feed bacteria in the belly and can lead to bloating, pain, wind etc in the belly.I am about to try the diet myself as my IBS has been getting worse and worse at present – probably due to stress but I feel I need to try something else.

    I had a colonoscopy for the first time last year and I was prepared for the prep to be difficult but not the ongoing aftermath. It was about six months ago and I feel my whole digetive system is still not even closing to getting back on track. It has made me feel very reticent to have another one when I’m due.
    Hope your belly gets better soon,
    Steph

    PS Sol breads do some great gluten free options which are not all filled with corn and they deliver throughout Australia via mail. I think if you get six loaves the delivery is free. You do need to freeze the loaves and they have to be toasted and are a bit chewy and they are also not a cheap option but I find it is good to keep some loaves in the freezer sometimes if I can’t face another rice cake and want something toasty.
    ishop.solbreads.com.au

    [Reply]

    Martina Reply:

    Hey Steph,

    Thanks for the advice.
    I have heard of fodmaps, it is the diet my gut specialist recommended after he gave me my IBS results.
    I found that it didn’t suit me and frustrated me even more.

    I don’t like eating too many gluten free breads, pastas etc because I don’t like eating too many processed foods anymore. The closer to nature I can get the better.

    But something that definitely has helped me is the pro-biotic. So I would recommend you tried one if you don’t already take one. But it has to be a good one. And I take mine away from food.

    My other saviour has been my classical homeopath. She is brilliant and has helped me cope with my IBS so much better than any doctor has.

    All the best for your belly too :)

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    HI Martina,

    Yes I do the probiotic thing and fish oil which if I stop taking (the fish oil) I very quickly get skin issues. Interesting you didn’t find the fodmap diet helpful – I haven’t found any one diet helpful for IBS at this point so I confess I’ve been putting off starting it. With three kids and a busy career I find I have to have backups like some GF bread in the freezer as some weeks when I have stories due and kids have lots of homework and things on and then sport on weekends etc I am not able to manage as much baking. I have had to be very careful of herbs because of their high amines and salycilates content too so that’s not a good option for my belly – I see a great acupuncturist and she really helped but can’t afford to get there that often (despite being in private health care) as our food bills for a family are so enormous. I have also tried other remedies like mint etc to no avail. But I am pretty certain that if I could afford not to be a working mum ie could choose to take on stories rather than need to do work every week and if my kids didn’t have so many health issues to deal with then I believe that my tummy would probably improve big time.
    Steph

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Hey Martina, sorry to hear you have been so sick! Surgery is never fun. You poor thing.

    Have you looked into intestinal Candida? Most modern doctors are skeptical it exists, but an anti-Candida diet recommended by a kinesiologist did amazing things for me. I had symptoms like yours which is why I suggest it. Oddly enough, coming off the combined oral contraceptive pill also did wonders, oestrogen does terrible things to my belly. My doctor won’t admit to either of these things being the cause of my problems but my lack of symptoms speak for themselves.

    Hope that helps, and you get to the bottom of things. xx

    [Reply]

    Martina Reply:

    Thanks Mia.
    I actually haven’t considered Candida. I’ll discuss it with my classical homeopath next time I see her.
    All of my problems actually started around the time I came off the pill back in December 2010. Obviously not all at once… Over time I started putting on weight and the gut issues started.
    I came off the pill not to have children but to give my body a chance to do what it needs to do naturally and if there were any problems hormonally then I could address them.
    So my problems may partially be hormonal.
    But I’m working through them one by one.
    Thanks for your advice :)

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Hormones are funny buggers, no? I’ve struggled with mine since my teenage years. It has been only recently I have linked certain things, like stomach issues and insomnia, to reproductive hormones. A friend gets alopecia which can be made either better or worse with different brands of birth control pills.

    Good luck sorting it out, I find it odd that doctors say bowels can be irritable for no reason, so I hope you get the answers you need!

  • Mia Bluegirl

    I dont react well to yeast and am allergic to gluten, so I relate to multiple ailments and sensitive bellies! Giving up nearly all grains helped me a lot, the only one I can tolerate without issues is white rice, which I only have occasionally. It’s amazing how once I gave up grains for a time, they taste really cardboard-y and make me drowsy when I have them.

    The part of the intestinal vili that processes milk is on the very tip. Gluten will damage the vili and blunt them in people who are sensitive to it, which is why many celiacs have dairy issues – the tips of the vili are missing! Good news is, once celiacs quit gluten and the vili grow back often they can tolerate dairy again.

    [Reply]

  • madalee

    i was wondering if guten intolerence can manifest as severe acne in teenagers. Anyone have any experience re this?

    [Reply]

    stephanie Reply:

    Hey Madalee,

    Certainly could be responsible. If you are sensitive to something then your body reacts to it as an invader and it causes internal inflammation. As your skin is your body’s largest organ, that inflammation will often show up there first.

    Acne is a disease of Western societies. Yet in hunter-gatherer societies it was almost non existant. The difference? Their diet, which was based on more natural foods such as fresh fruits, vegetables, wholegrain, lean meats and seafood. For this reason acne only appeared amongst people like the Eskimos for example, when they adopted a Western diet of highly processed and refined foods.

    Growing evidence suggests that acne may be influenced by a domino affect
    between hormonal changes and insulin levels. So if a teen has a good diet but is still getting acne it could be because food imbalance is causing not only inflammation but in the process is upsetting their hormone balance at a time when they are ungergoing hormonal changes.

    Am RMIT Uni study called All About Acne looked at this. They found that the anti-acne
    diet worked through a domino effect – by reducing insulin levels which have an impact on the hormones associated with acne. During the RMIT study, the young men on the hunter-gatherer diet experienced a beneficial reduction in insulin levels and insulin resistance. They swapped their usual diet for one with higher protein, lower glycemic index ie more fruit and vegetables, lean red meat, seafood and wholegrains (though some natural health professionals would suggest cutting right back on grains which can be acidic in the body). In only 12 weeks the right diet reduced their acne by 50% – so if you suspect gluten is a prob, cutting it out is definitely worth a try.
    Good luck
    Steph

    [Reply]

  • Yvonne

    I have been gluten-free for several years. Although many of my digestive issue have improved I still suffer from constant tiredness. I can’t believe I didn’t know that corn could be an issue. I eat it every single day. I use an orgran bread mix and the first ingredient is maize. I also rely on corn thins for snacks. Thanks so much for this article. I’m going to cut out corn starting this week to see if it makes a difference.

    [Reply]

  • Anthony

    Yvonne, have you considered bioresonance therapy? It cured my alergy to gluten and wheat!

    [Reply]

  • Carly

    I was diagnosed last year with lactose intolerance through a gastroscopy as i was suffering with extreme cramping, bloating and nausea.
    I have been fine since April this year where my symptoms came back 100 times worse…(escpecially when i ate gluten)
    I started to get vomiting, reflux, constipation, cramping, bloating, migraines, pressure in my head, lethargic and mood swings.
    I went and saw my local naturopath who put me on a few herbal medicines as she said I had leaky gut and IBS.
    I have been on the medice for a month now and it has helped alot, but now my symptoms are getting worse as I now have short term memory loss, mood swings, anxiety attacks, constant pressure in my head, constantly cold, lethargic to the point where I can’t get myself out of bed and severe depression.
    I am booked in for a gastroscopy and colonoscopy next week, HIDA scan for my pancreas and I am being tested for a blood disease called pyroluria.
    I am 100% positive that the pyroluria test is going to come back positive as I can tick off the entire list.
    I was just curious if anyone else had heard of this blood disease? or developed any symptoms that i have?

    [Reply]

    Patricia Reply:

    Give up sugar and wheat ….i have and feel like a new person good luck x

    [Reply]

  • http://www.blogabond.com/stefanocline26 Banana Nut Muffins Recipe

    I think this is one of the most vital information for me. And i am glad reading your article. But should remark on some general things, The web site style is perfect, the articles is really excellent : D. Good job, cheers

    [Reply]

  • Patricia

    Hi please try probiotics my grandaughter has been having them since she had colic as a new born….she is now 4 and never been sick for even one day…the type she takes are reuteri drops .
    Also look at dr cambel mcbride on you tube talkingabout gut problems in children amazing. All the very best

    [Reply]

  • http://scdlifestyle.com/ Jordan Reasoner

    Steph, thank you so much for raising more awareness about this. You rock!!!

    Once I finally discovered I had Celiac Disease, 2 years on a strict gluten-free diet didn’t help me get better. I was still having Diarrhea 5-10 times a day!

    Soy-free, dairy-free, and nut-free still didn’t do it.

    It wasn’t until I eliminated all cereal grains and sugar that my D stopped. It only took 7-days. I was one happy dude!

    Anyways, I’m so glad that this information is getting out to more people. I wrote an article a while back that touched on this same idea that a gluten-free diet doesn’t mean it’s healthy… or that it will make you feel better.

    It’s called, “The Toxic Truth About Gluten-Free Food”

    http://scdlifestyle.com/2012/04/the-toxic-truth-about-gluten-free-food-and-celiac-disease/

    Love to hear your thoughts on it.

    Much respect,
    Jordan

    [Reply]

  • Mel Curry

    Hi Steph, Sarah

    Do you lovely ladies know about the Whole30 program?? Check it out here:

    http://whole9life.com/category/whole-30/

    The program is all about simply eating real food! Might be just what your family needs Steph.

    I’ve just finished reading “It Starts with Food”. Its an awesome read!

    http://whole9life.com/itstartswithfood/

    http://whole9life.com/itstartswithfood/

    [Reply]

  • http://Facebook Gwendoline Taylor

    I have been a problem I as told all my life. I am a farmer’ daughter (now 88) and from early in my childhood I refused almost ALL dairy, and lived almost entirely on fruit, vegetables and artisian well water (we had one in the farmyard with a pump to access.
    I now live mostly the same but can no longer eat the Hovis original that I really loved. Still abhor butter and cheese I hate cheese especially cooked. I never had much sugar and when I started to drink adult tea/coffee still no sugar. I was 84 when I was told by my GP that I probably had IBS and since I found bread was a problem I cut out Gluten too. I was then seen by a very uncooperative GP in the practice and when I told him my dietary problems he asked had I had a blood test and was rude and I said I would have one but, having cut out Gluten the test showed nothing and he felt vindicated. I shall never see him if I can avoid it. I find most of the Gluten free cake products are super loaded with sugar, UGH. I find the tea cakes, Hot cross Buns inedible they don’t toast, they burn. The are hard as bricks and I have never made edible bread in my life. Sainsburys Soft Bake White is about the best but tastes of blotting paper no matter what you put on it. I loved Marmite so I guess that is not on my menu any more. I am just thankful I only got the dread complaint at 84. I did lose 3.5 stones when I went Gluten Free which I could afford to do and up to being 70 ish I was thin as a pin. However, I still cycle and though now a days I find I tire more quickly I am so fortunate. My late husband had just about every allergy it was possible to have. All my married life, almost 52 years I had to make him separate meals from the rest of the family. I am still mostly a veggie, but do at the GPs insistence have a little fish and less chicken. I feel better having a moan. Sincerely, GWEN, PS my cousin and two of her daughters are Coeliac. Is it a family thing then?

    [Reply]

  • http://wonderfullyworthy.com WonderfullyWorthy

    Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! I have celiac and don’t eat sugar but was still having major stomach pains and and migraines and couldn’t figure out why. I am totally going to give going corn free a try! You are the best :)

    [Reply]

  • Melissa

    My son was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease last August, he’s 18. We had his restroom urges under control then, we went to a rheumatoid arthritis doctor since he had so much pain in his joints and back. She recommended the ALCAT food sensitivity test. It came back and he was HIGHLY sensitive to beef, blueberry, clam, coconut, egg yolk, peach, salmon, candida albicans, cane sugar, honey, and fructose. He has a moderate sensitivity to gluten, barley, oat, wheat. No reaction to whey. Basically, he an eat chicken, certain types of fish, fruits and veggies.

    His vitamin D was 25 so we are getting that up too.

    The problem is he is now bleeding when he using the restroom whereas, prior to this diet, he was’t bleeding at all. It seemed Coke helps control the bowel problems-but, it has sugar in it.

    Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

  • http://stronaprawastro strona

    I’ve emphatically in progress at Preteen Insufficiently Nymphets Mr Sunburned gave the girls a field tumble to the Cumbersome Banana .. attractive in the yoghurt factory before receiving inedible bus strona http://stronaprawastronalewa.com

    [Reply]

  • Christal

    Following years of tests, sickness and pain I never had a real diagnosis of having a problem with Gluten but I have been gluten free for 13 years now . All I know is when I ate gluten I was extremely sick and when I stopped eating it over time my body healed. Through the many years of seeing doctors and being diagnosed with IBS, fructose malabsorption and lactose intolerance, with no real answers to my Gluten intolerance I have discovered that the most important thing is to listen to your own body. More recently my brother, father and now my 3 nephews have all experienced the same symptoms as myself and have all gone Gluten free, so it really makes me think there is some family connection, even though my parents and I had genetic testing done for Celiac disease that showed nothing. My dad has a thyroid disorder and arthritis. All the research I have been doing on these also point to a gluten free diet as a way to help minimise the damage and inflammation. The best thing I ever did was take my diet and my health into my own hands. I’m focusing on adding probiotics, omega 3s and fermented raw food to my diet. For all of you searching for answers I found information on Leaky Gut syndrome helpful and also anti-inflammatory foods really helped so keep searching because there is alot of new research out there all the time. My low vitamin D levels were also something I had to fix. Goodluck with your health and keep sharing!

    [Reply]

  • Tricia

    Hi has any one had success treating discoud lupus (skin only) with dietary and lifestle changes. My doctor said you have an auto -immune disease and that’s that. Love to hear your feedback.

    [Reply]