marilyn’s bizzare (paleo) eating

Posted on April 19th, 2012

I love learning what other people’s eating routines look like. I love routines. I love learning anything about Marilyn’s short life.

Via Glamornet.com

Whacko! An article from the 1952 issue of Pageant that outlines Marilyn’s eating routine…and beyond. It’s intriguingly Paleo, you’ll note: milk, eggs, liver, lamb chops. Remember, up until quite recently a grain-based diet was seen as fattening (ie farmers fed their pigs grains to fatten them up). It was roughly the 1950s when cereal companies started changing the dietary messaging.

Below is her approach to exercise, which I really rather like (“I couldn’t stand exercise if I had to feel regimented about it”):

To read the rest, click here. Perve on.

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  • http://chrisandjentooman.com jentooman

    I don’t think you can drink milk on a paleo diet…

    [Reply]

    Angela Reply:

    Not on a strict “Paleo” diet.But on a “Primal” diet,dairy is fine if you can tolerate it.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    correct
    as always, in life, there are no rules!

    [Reply]

  • Bronwyn

    Impossible to read this without hearing Marilyn’s sweet breathy voice in my head :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    me too bronwyn!!!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.boxandbrownie.com Hannah

    I have read about her eating and approach to exercise a few times – it seems like she was quite sensible and balanced about it in the early days. Such a shame the studios destroyed her :(

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    And clearly very bright!!

    [Reply]

  • linda

    I have heard somewhere that perhaps this was a studio puff piece and did not really reflect Marilyn’s true diet or exercise regime. She didn’t appear to be a very happy healthy person in reality…

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    That reminds me of my friend’s sister, an Australian model, who was profiled in an Australian fashion magazine & asked about her healthy eating regime – she said “oatmea with berriesl, carrot sticks & hummus, grilled chicken & salad, steamed vegetables & fish, lots of water” etc, the usual shtick. My friend thought it was hilarious. “She survives on diet coke and cigarettes!” she told me.

    It’s totally feasible that this was a puff piece as well but I don’t sense it in this case because it is so bizarre and seemingly idiosyncratic. I guess we’ll never know though!

    [Reply]

    linda Reply:

    I can just imagine! Thanks for sharing that! Diet coke and cigarettes – hmmm appetising – NOT! ;)

    [Reply]

    Rachael Reply:

    Plus, I think it was different times back then. Celebrity focus wasn’t as an intense as it is these days so I doubt there would be much reason to roll out a “puff piece”.

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    A studio hack wrote this, that’s for sure. That’s just the way it was. The studio’s completely controlled their stars images. Marilyn Monroe did not pop by her local market every afternoon then broil a bit of meat for dinner.

    It’s not a particularly odd diet considering the time, and I imagine the idea was to try to make a connection with average people, when really Marilyn was drinking champagne and popping pills.

    [Reply]

  • Ivy

    A diet in the 70s meant cutting carbs and eating cottage cheese and grape fruit! Oh how things have changed!
    Sarah, check this out: http://www.wellnessrenegade.com/ancient-pathway-optimal-health-cold-thermogenesis-cold-showers

    [Reply]

  • Mel

    didn’t she live on a diet of pills, pills & more pills??

    [Reply]

    Ivy Reply:

    Eventually, yes.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    she started off smart and stable

    [Reply]

  • Christa

    Who doesn’t need a good bust-firming routine?

    I must, I must, I must increase my bust.
    I will, I will to give the boys a thrill!

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    I did, I did
    And now I’ve got a kid!
    ;-D

    [Reply]

    Melisa Reply:

    We always said, “For fear, for fear that they will disappear!”

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    lol ;-D

    [Reply]

  • Kath

    I love Marilyn, she was just fabulous! i actually love reading what people eat everyday, Marilyn Monroe or Joe Blow !

    [Reply]

  • http://www.rachaelphillips.net rachael

    what a great find!! I now want to try the milk and eggs thing. A tall scrambled egg to go!

    [Reply]

  • lucy

    That’s so interesting! Love Marilyn, love the Primal diet.

    [Reply]

  • Eva

    Was isn’t she gorgeous! Great choice of photos. Inspiringly Paleo!

    [Reply]

  • Cathy F

    Marilyn – allegedly – had an IQ of 160! I wonder if her mother’s eating habits influenced her diet and/or her IQ? As above, I guess we will never know. I also wonder that if she had stuck with her good eating habits would she have been better able to cope with her depression?

    My sister is bi-polar and I’ve noticed that when she used to include oily fish and good fats in her diet, her moods didn’t swing so severely.

    [Reply]

    Mel Reply:

    How would her mother’s eating habits have anything to do with Maryilyn’s IQ??? Please explain

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    Eating habits and IQ I don’t believe are related although it does raise interesting questions for those with ‘leaky gut’ syndrome (gluten intolerance) for the gluten leaches into the bloodstream and does indeed have an opiate-effect on the brain (which is why autistics often looked ‘spaced-out’ – it’s because they are). Although autism is NOT a mental disorder as is commonly believed, it is an organ-failure disfunction.

    Besides, her mother suffered terrible mental anguish and spent most of Marilyn’s childhood, and I suspect her adulthood as well, institutionalised.

    I’ve always had a soft-spot for Marilyn and have her movies and biographies but I don’t believe she was intelligent – on the contrary, the people who knew her often had little respect for her and considered her underdeveloped both mentally and emotionally.

    [Reply]

  • Cathy F

    Hi Mel, a few years(?) ago there was a documentary on SBS/ABC about human IQ and the link between the diet of the mother whilst pregnant and the IQ of the fetus – the eating habits of the father (via sperm) were also important. It said IQ was in the main inherited but was also affected by diet.

    Also Vik, Marilyn did have her IQ tested and it was extremely high. But there are around 7 types of IQ, including emotional. Just because someone is extremely intelligent, does not mean they are “emotionally intelligent” as well – ie someone can also be “smart” but not “wise” – if that helps.

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    I probably should have mentioned that I studied psychology and worked as a psychotherapist in a couple of disciplines… ;-) *chortles* So I quite agree with you that there are different types of intelligence. Moreover, I think it tantamount to a society (well, patriarchal Western culture anyway) that intellectual intelligence is revered yet peculiarly overlooked at the same time, especially when it comes to women and minorities. Emotional intelligence doesn’t really get much of a look-in as it isn’t taught nor even nurtured in the world at large.

    I long for a paradigm change when it comes to this kind of thing. One of my heros is Brene Brown PhD who works with Emotional Resilience – her work is fascinating and she gave a tremendous talk on TED which I find so inspiring. If you don’t know her, I urge you to check her out! I just love her. In a nutshell, our lives reflect our inner landscape and how we relate to feelings and thoughts surrounding WORTH. We are all ultimately here for CONNECTION. And how sad it is to behold such a beauty such as Marilyn, who was and is, adored and yet she numbed herself with food, drugs, sex and alcohol in an effort to escape her inner turmoil. It seems so tragic and wasteful and sad, doesn’t it, that she felt so alone?

    I have a dvd here in my collection called ‘Norma Jean & Marilyn’ played by Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino. They both do a great job playing her as the younger swimsuit model and Hollywood siren. I’m always left wistful yet my heart rises when watching it; she’s also one of the most enigmatic characters to come out of Hollywood and I’m ALWAYS intrigued by her story.

    I mean, look at us all dying to know what she ate for breakfast! She’s fascinating! ;-D

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    I found that really interesting, VikLee. I find it so sad how the fascination with Marilyn at the time – well, fascination with her body and her sex appeal as opposed to HER – was so dehumanizing and ultimately led to her destruction. To be adored by so many, both men and women, sounds like a dream but – as evidenced by her tragic and untimely end – was so isolating. I can imagine how lonely she was up there on that pedestal, poor thing.

    I think intelligence counts for naught in the presence of addiction, also. In fact it probably makes it worse – depression being not uncommon in those with above average IQ. I know anecdotally of a correlation between intelligence and increased rates of depression and addiction, and I wouldn’t be surprised if there were studies to back this up. A lot of the reason actors and studio execs hated her, is that she frequently forgot her lines and turned up late due to being muddled by drugs and alcohol. I guess we can never say what she would have been like had those influences not been present.

    I agree… she is fascinating!

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    Thanks Mia :-)

    I’ll let you in on a little secret…
    *clandestine wink*
    We’re ALL addicted.

    Poor junkies cop it the worst because they’re the most obvious and wretched-looking and certain drugs are deemed illegal and therefore judged as ‘bad.’ Obese & overweight people suffer too but they’re not vilified as much as smokers who are actually banished in public spaces even though their addiction is a LEGAL product. And then of course there is sugar and sex and alcohol and work-addiction, oh how the list goes on – anything really that has us avoiding painful consequences that lie thinly-veiled under our social masks and private thought processes.

    And i quite agree with you that the higher the IQ, the seemingly higher the instance of thought processes and recognition of ‘spiky areas’ that are disquieting and become ‘no-go zones’ so we numb. Ignorance is bliss? The conundrum with the cycle is that we cannot effectively numb the bad stuff. We also numb creativity, joy, vulnerability – all the elements that show us we’re alive(!) And so we don’t feel much of anything…and then we feel empty, dull and lifeless – much seems pointless and so we numb to escape those feelings.

    The way I see it, our bodies speak to us and are often the last bastien or attempt to get ourselves to wake-up from ourselves. I’m still figuring out what is at the root of my symptoms that flare up and haunt me (fibromyalgia) and while I have a high regard for factual and/or scientific data on such matters, there is a lot of talk conveniently moved over to talk of the perils of eating this and that and not much interaction about our emotions – which for me, are the underlying catalysts.

    I aced IQ tests but that doesn’t stop my mind through certain periods turning into a runaway-train with each caboose representing an area of my life that I try to ‘figure out’ – thinking, striving, searching, ruminating for answers that don’t come with a convenient ‘choose A, B, C, or D’ format. And even if and when they do – the choosing can become debilitating itself for fear of making the wrong decision. Anxiety and depression often work along these types of lines. In my darkest moments, I feel like ‘There’s a hole in the bucket, Dear Liza,’ is my fricken swan-song! ;-)

    And in a consumerist culture in such that we live which creates itself from the outside-in, there is pressure to project ‘success’ and ‘happiness.’ Our dynamic and fast-paced cosmopolitan lifestyles often see our adrenals on over-drive and caffeine addiction to bolster us during our days and the ubiquitous glass of wine or three at night to unwind are seen to be as they say in sociology, the social moral order of things – or accepted ways of doing things. And hence we all hide and duck for cover under what seems or is deemed appropriate or not, despite it really splintering us, in the long run and causing us grief.

    I think we all love Marilyn because she was a heightened version of us that, as nervous animals, we can all relate to. She was just more conspicuous. ;-)

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    I agree with all of that. I find it quite refreshing.

    I see the judgement even in some of these comments, about addiction. I know a little of what it is like because I have a very addictive personality and can absolutely relate to everything you said about that. My history with narcotics is interesting, and while I found that easy to give up (I got bored after a few years and quit) some of my friends weren’t so lucky. Oddly enough, I find the everyday addictions are harder to give up. Phases of binging/ starving and destructive sex rear their head when I am anxious or depressed. Which logically shouldn’t happen, I am a middle class person who can afford therapy and has an above average IQ and knows how silly it is to destroy my life like that. But addiction and depression don’t descriminate based on talent or money or IQ, and I see it all around me.

    Most of the time, I feel like there is some secret for happiness and success that everyone else was let in on at birth, and I missed out.

    Thanks Viklee, that was an interesting read.

  • Cathy F

    I just googled her IQ – see link “10 things you probaby never knew about Marilyn Monroe”:
    http://www.redbull.com/cs/Satellite/en_INT/Article/Movie-Feature-10-Things-You-Probably-Never-Knew-About-Marilyn-Monroe-021243125810708. It said below:

    “Despite having an impressive IQ score of 168 (significantly higher than John F. Kennedy’s score of 129), Monroe was notorious for forgetting her lines.”

    Cheers.

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    crikey! I nearly shed a tear reading all that! ;-) thanx

    [Reply]

  • Cathy F

    I so agree with you that other types of IQ – esp emotional – are under-appreciated in our culture …. though I think things are slowly changing. Case in point – my darling husband’s intellectual IQ is genius level, but his emotional …. hasn’t grown much beyond when his dad died when he was 11 yrs old. Lucky we round each other out! Never had mine tested, but am pretty sure is very very average. I look forward to checking out Brene Brown & TED – thanks!

    When I read a little of Marilyn’s bio, no wonder the poor woman was unstable – that type of trauma would be enough to unhinge anyone! Still, I guess that “vulnerabilty” helped make her such a popular actor.

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    You know Cathy that the one about ‘opposites attract’ is fallacious. Energetically, like attracts like. And the number 1 element that holds couples together is… intelligence levels! So, you probably have a high IQ, too! ;-)

    [Reply]

  • Esta

    I like a couple of her comments. Firstly that she liked to “feel blonde all over” and avoided being too tanned and that she used to worry about getting enough food and then Once famous she had to worry about getting too much!

    I remember growing up and seeing pictures of my family in the 70s – there were very few overweight people in our social circle. My mum recalls that in her younger years you ate to fuel yourself rather than for something to do or for a treat. Also she prepared everything when we were growing up. There were very few convenience foods around.

    Even during my teenage years (I’m now 35) we rarely got takeaway for tea and my mum worked 7 days a week in our family business. It was such a treat when we got Kentucky or fish and chips. They were real sometimes foods. Granted my brother and I had a chocolate bar everyday in our lunch boxes, along with fruit and a sandwich yet we never struggled with our weight, we’re always outside and had no such thing as a computer game heaven forbid! How time changes! It’s just so easy to grab and go now days.

    Ideally enjoyed reading this article. What a shame she didn’t live long enough to go on to better things.

    [Reply]

  • Rosie

    Any idea how a woman that apparently only had two eggs for breakfasts and a serve of protein and carrot sticks at dinner time was as curvy as she was?

    [Reply]

  • Mia Bluegirl

    I’ve been eating a diet composed almost entirely of protein lately also – traveling through parts of Europe where meat and cheese are breakfast foods, and everywhere sells goulash soup and sausage. Surprisingly, my tummy issues have never been calmer. Perhaps Marilyn was really onto something!

    I love Marilyn for her duality… she was this beautiful, confident, sexual creature but she was incredibly vulnerable and sensitive also. I find her so interesting. I also find it amazing/ slightly sickening the reaction of the public to celebrities, and the idea that they are owed something from this person just because she was famous.

    I dont think I could drink raw eggs though…

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    Mia, I lived in France for 6 years and what I noticed sharply is that Europeans don’t have (much) of GMO foods. They also cook from scratch a lot of the time and don’t rely on convenience foods. Here in Australia we ‘live to work’ and lunch time is about grabbing something from a local sandwich bar that we can shove down our throats to ward off starvation. These foods aren’t made ‘with love’ nor are the ingredients often qualitative. I liked having an extended lunch break in France and eating a proper cooked meal which is eaten ritualistically & calmly (with small portions to boot!).

    I also noticed that they are the aborigines of their landscapes. Whereas here in Australia, we have a variety of foods which is culturally interesting and varied, but the produce is still native to europe – not here. So in effect, we’re not really living in harmony with our natural landscape and that was a huge revelation for me. We also have ‘fresh produce’ that is mostly all GMO and produced all year round. Our wheat is different from Europe as well, hence our breads never seem as good (and 12 bucks a loaf for even the good stuff such as Sonoma {yum!} seems a bit steep;-). Most of our supermarkets stock poison and I’m amazed it’s legal to pass it off as food-stuff. I’m often grinding my teeth when it comes to finding quality produce that doesn’t have me feeling like I’ve just been raped when I pass through the check-out. Fresh produce street markets are everywhere in France 6 days a week where you can pick up seasoned produce for 1 or 2 Euro a kilo – even a bunch of coriander is 30 cents. Moving to Sydney has done my head in when comparing cost of living and when they say it’s the highest in the world here – I can believe it. Enjoy Europe – they have much to share with us. Take in all the good you can find and never let it go. :-)

    [Reply]

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  • tania

    waiting at AUckland airport for my flight home to sydney & found free internet access thanks to display ipads in duty free shop! now i can catch up on sarahs blog for the week.

    [Reply]

  • Cathy F

    Thanks for the IQ tip Vik … yes, am very aware that energetically we are similar – its only on the surface that we appear opposite. Re high IQ/depression link …. my bestie, who is a teacher with mensa-level IQ herself (bloody hell, am surrounded by ‘em!), has always said “the higher the IQ, the closer to madness” lol.

    Re Europe – I finally got to Europe for first time last year – spending most of our time in Northern Italy, where we ate local produce, didn’t skimp on any foods and also ate three meals per day …. and lost 5 kilos each!

    I must admit, I hardly saw any fat Italians (some slighly chubby, but certainly not obese) – even the elderly were still relatively slim. Ciao bella.

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    Bella! (sorry, took me awhile to work out what was where with notifications;-)

    I prefer smart people as friends because they can have a way with challenging you and their kooky personalities don’t make me look/feel so bad ;-P *chortles* as opposed to those who confuse outrageous behaviour with being open-minded… like genius/madness – the line can blur. In fact what your friend says reminds me of the Dali quote, “…psychopathologists themselves not knowing where genius ends and madness begins…”

    And the Italian trip – sounds Heavenly. The thing is, I find there’s a strong correlation with the people (Europeans) having a connection to the land and the seasons that we don’t really have. I got to appreciate the seasons and the produce when living there – where here it all kind of blends. They don’t have those GMO foods either such as oversized fruit and veg (which is usually stored frozen for a long time) and their servings are adequate. Here in Australia, we’re such a consumerist nation that has taken on a lot of American Imperialist notions such as big servings (totally irritates me that the servings at cafes and restaurants are SO big and therefore over-priced) and the produce already seems lacking energetically as it isn’t in sync with nature or even the earth (industrialised farming such as hothouses which produce all year-round).

    I really got to learn about and better understand my own culture by learning and living another. The cultural mind-set is not only just different, but most often opposite so now I live like Milan Kundera says, ‘forever a life of exile,’ for I don’t belong neither here nor there; I can see both sides of the fence.

    The thing about Europeans though – before we start granting them sainthood – is that they eat well, but don’t even try asking one of them if they know what ‘perfect protein’ is or even a carbohydrate. They boast about their food but without really understanding or knowing why it’s good – this is an upshot of being traditional – they have a very real reticence for change which often works against them. On many levels, I felt I was living in my grandmother’s generation – sexism and patriarchy still rule the day (although they don’t really see it that way as they don’t have any outside reference point so are blind to their ways, too). They also eat meat for lunch and dinner which is just too excessive in my mind.

    Even the French extol the virtues of cheese and dairy with that old excuse of being a great source of calcium (sesame seeds have 10X the value from what I hear;-) and that’s got a lot to do with the lobbyists I suspect. For what I’ve come to understand is that milk is made for babies and the only reason we tolerate it as adults is because we’ve never weaned ourselves from it.

    I try not to be too extreme these days as I find the people who are about eating this and that fall into the perilous trap of becoming pious which has a very ex-clusive {rather than inclusive} nature about them (comparing oneself to and judging others is a rocky road and is egoically flirting with danger). Life is for living and I’m reticent to throw the baby out with the bath water these days. Sure, even alcohol is a POISON, but I’ve learned that it’s ok to get a bit pissed from time to time celebrating with a bottle of champagne for a birthday or the like – it’s hardly the same thing as being an alcoholic. I’m caffeine free because my stomach can be super sensitive and I prefer not having the ups and downs of energy throughout the day – so it’s about finding what works for YOU. By the way, I worship at the alter of Slippery Elm -allows me to get away with murder at times and I can have a bit of this and that and not be too hurt by whatever it is – providing my emotional state is good, I’m usually pretty ok with having bits and pieces containing lactose, alcohol etc.

    I’m quite convinced that the obese epidemic is due to a number of factors: relativity – most people are ‘fat’ and they compare and contrast with others and think it’s ok because they’re not totally huge so the way we internalise ‘normal’ becomes askew. Convenience foods that seem healthy aren’t really – ready-made packaged/frozen meals. We’ve become time-poor despite our modern conveniences. And also a lot of it has to do with respect. Culturally we’re looked down upon overseas often as we don’t blend with local customs and manners thinking our pious notions of being ‘laid back’ make us seem easy-going when to me (and outsiders), it shows a lack of insight and respect to others and causes grief and emotional upsets. I personally think we live in a narcissistic culture and it is due to our avoidant behaviours and ways of thinking and seeing that cause us to feel empty. There is a big pressure to come across as successful and happy so we don’t share honestly in fear of being judged or seen as ‘less than.’ There’s a lot of pressure from unrelenting marketing that we buy into. Veuve Clicquot is a perfect example of consuming a luxury product here and yet as far as champagnes go, it’s very ordinary (no French person drinks it – it’s a bit like Fosters here;-) So what I’m saying is, consumptions becomes more about image rather than actual likes, benefits and appreciation for what it really is.

    [Reply]

  • VikLee

    Hi Mia

    I remember in a psych lecture at uni once about the notion of people believing they have addictive personalities to be fallacious – so you’re off the hook with that one;-) BTW, you sound pretty normal to me. We’re products of our culture more than we’d have ourselves believe.

    I think Australian youth (especially) binging on drugs and drink seems like the usual right of passage and again, it’s because we’ve got so many avoidant features going on. Our animal drives are fear-based after all and having the luxury to even turn to food is one of the perils of living in the rich Western world.

    I also think we put a lot of energy into our social personas which has a lot to do with class aspiration (just hearing the augmented accents in Eastern suburbs Sydney causes me to stifle sniggers I find it so pretentious, if not sad). Life has ups and downs and this biased view of always being ‘happy’ just isn’t a balanced view, the way I see it. I think it comes down to our unwillingness to be seen for who we are – warts and all in fear of judgment that is the root of this cultural pandemic. It seems if you say, “I’ve been feeling a it depressed this week (or worse, month! – or fill in the blank), the usual response sees others squirming uncomfortably as if you’re carrying a virus of the mind that might affect them. Such is the perils of Taking Things Personally. And then of course we feel ‘not normal’ or ‘less than’ (hello depression!) and so we binge – to escape ourselves and so the cycle propagates like a self-fulfilling prophecy.

    Have you watched the Brene Brown vid yet? If you haven’t – I’m sure you’d love her just as much as I do ;-)

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Can I concede occasional poor impulse control then, instead of addictive personality? :) I guess in that regard, we are all just animals chasing our dopamine triggers. As highly evolved as we think we are, we still have primate brains and bodies.

    Sarah actually wrote a few posts on Brene which is how I got inot her. Are you referring to her TED talk on vulnerability when you speak of her video? If so yes I have seen it. I absolutely love her. Hence why I admit to squicky stuff here… being vulnerable feels kinda good. It’s nice to admit that I’m bad at things and don’t have it all together. The only true wisdom, after all, is knowing you know nothing. xx

    [Reply]

    VikLee Reply:

    *VL chortles and gives Mia a big ol’ slap on the back!*

    Yes, I was referring to the TED talk vid – great to hear you’ve seen it and yes, I can see the benefit of you having watched it. I enjoy your posts for their frank and very real content – thanks so much for sharing – you really do make me break out into a big grin :-D

    btw: one of my fave expressions is, “I know four-fifths of f* all!” ;-P

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    Hehehe, I know 7/8ths of fuck all :D

    Interestingly, I was reading today that introverts react differently to dopamine in the brain than extroverts, which is partly why they are so much easier to overwhelm. SO fascinating the way individuals respond so differently to different stimuli, environments, chemicals, hormones and such! The human brain and body are a marvel, they truly are.

    Thank you for being accepting of my sharing… it’s hard… but then if there is one thing I’ve learned in my 28 years it’s that you are never the first to go through something. I always feel approx. one million times better when I am going through a hard situation and someone else opens up about it. Yay for humans not being alone in things :)

    TED talks are awesome and I wish they had them in Marilyn’s day. Maybe then she wouldn’t be so lonely.

  • Joey

    Where’s her lunch? Aahhhh, she probably just downed a ton of pills :)

    [Reply]

  • VikLee

    Hey Mia, If you’re interested in hooking up via fb you can find me under Vicki-Lee Cayrouse ;-)

    I’d lovet to take a squiz at that article you read – sounds interesting! It seems I’m pretty much constantly amazed, underwhelmed, overwhelmed and bored by our humanity ;-P The older I get – the weirder I think we as a species are! And I feel mighty dissatisfied knowing that i won’t understand it all before I die… *chuckles and throws head back and howls at the moon*

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    I couldnt find you for some reason, probably my smart phone being very un-smart, but if you look me up as Mia Bluegirl I’d say I’d be the only one. I comment on Sarah’s Facebook page a lot, too.

    There is a book called the Introvert Advantage, which apparently goes into the dopamine/ acetylcholine neurosciencey brainbox stuff, but I’ve never read it since reading a review which said it treated introversion like a disability. I’m not disabled I’m just weird, leave me alone society, grumble mutter grumble. So if you want you can google introversion/ extroversion with dopamine and plenty of reviews on the science behind it should come up!

    We are SUCH a weird species. So many things I will never understand… that thought often overwhelms me, that I will not understand everything, from how human beings are wired to what REALLY happened to the crew of the Mary Celeste. *sigh*

    [Reply]

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