another (surprising) reason to exercise

Posted on October 10th, 2012

I don’t exercise to get fit or lose weight. I do it to get clear and clean in the head. And I do it every day, because I want to be clear and clean every day. As it’s a simple, do-able goal with an immediate outcome (I feel clearer and cleaner instantly, but I don’t lose weight from exercise for months, if at all), I’m rewarded for my efforts and incentivised to keep going. And going.

Me mountain biking in Provence…one of the most creative things a girl can do

But another reason to exercise is for the mental agility it imbues, which, in turn, aids creativity.  I read this interview with Murakami in The Paris Review recently that touches on this. I thought I’d share. As with everything uttered by Haruki Murakami, it’s elegant and clear and clean:

” When I’m in writing mode for a novel, I get up at 4:00 a.m. and work for five to six hours. In the afternoon, I run for ten kilometers or swim for fifteen hundred meters (or do both), then I read a bit, and listen to some music. I go to bed at 9:00 p.m. I keep to this routine every day without variation. The repetition itself becomes the important thing; it’s a form of mesmerism. I mesmerize myself to reach a deeper state of mind. But to hold to such repetition for so long–six months to a year–requires a good amount of mental and physical strength. In that sense, writing a long novel is like survival training. Physical strength is as necessary as artistic sensitivity.

I totally agree with the repetition bit. And the every day bit. And the bit about physical strength being important to creative success. I draw on the physical depths I’ve gone to over the years to achieve all kinds of things. My four-week mountain bike trips and long hiking tours define who I am. I often get sad to think that some people – particularly women who’ve not been pushed to try challenging physical pursuits – never get to experience that depth of body and mind.

For the factoid fans out there:

  • A 2004 University of Southern Mississippi study showed students who walked at 50 percent of their maximum heart rates or ran on treadmills at 60 to 90 percent of their maximum heart rates reduced their sensitivity to anxiety, and that thorough rigorous exercise worked better.
  • A 2006 Dutch study of 19,288 twins and their families demonstrated those who exercised were “less anxious, less depressed, less neurotic, and also more socially outgoing.”
  • Studies now prove that aerobic exercise both increases the size of the prefrontal cortex and facilitates interaction between it and the amygdala. This is vitally important to creators because the prefrontal cortex, as we discussed earlier, is the part of the brain that helps tamp down the amygdala’s fear and anxiety signals.

What about you…does exercise work this way for you?

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  • http://autoimmunepaleo.wordpress.com Mickey

    I use exercise as a de-stress tool in the middle of the day. It helps me relax and clear my mind. I stopped working out ages ago – now I just walk or do yoga. I can’t not though, or I get crazy.

    Which reminds me… I better go on my walk! :)

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  • http://www.philippknoll.com Philipp Knoll

    Routines work great for me. Even though I feel like Rain Man I have routines for so many things: getting into a creative workflow, morning routines that help me to fire up etc.

    Variety is the key to me. A bit of everything. Times to focus entirely on being productive. Times to clear my mind. And other times to rest or enjoy.

    I recently published a post on bringing balance back into your life. Perhaps it is of value to any of you. You can find it here if you wish:

    Great excerpt from The Paris Review. Definitely a great way to accomplish a lot more.

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    Philipp Knoll Reply:

    Well – And here is the link I forgot to add above: http://bit.ly/UIgtTY

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Thanks Phil

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  • J

    Oh I totally agree, exercise is so good for the mind. For me, its almost like sleep, but for your brain. I do a barre class, and for one hour 3 times a week I’m completely out of my head and totally in sync with my body. My mind gets a chance to tune out, relax, turn off, and I feel so refreshed and truely awake. Bike riding does the same thing. And I get what you mean about the creative link with exercise, even though I’m completely not creative. But I always start thinking about writing, drawing or my tea collection (a bit of an obessession!) after intense exercise.

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  • http://www.twomoderncavewomen.com.au Two Modern Cavewomen

    As a CFS sufferer, exercise and I have an odd relationship. It’s not that I can’t do something if I need to, but I have trouble recovering, and sometimes it will bring on a relapse.

    Yesterday I did a 30 minute boxing session with a personal trainer, took 20 minutes to warm up and felt great for the last 10. 20 minutes after I came home I felt teh accompanying low and today, after a really solid sleep, feel like a bit of a zombie.

    I would dearly love to exercise every day, and in a small way, I do get out of my chair, play in my vegie garden and stand on my bosu ball in the office for a break, but daily routines are sometimes really hard for me to keep and provide a bit of stress if I’m not up to it. I’m hoping this will change.

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    Katherine Reply:

    I totally hear you…I would LOVE to exercise daily & in a variety of ways (and I used to before getting sick), but like you, I have CFS/adrenal issues that make it tough to do alot physcially. Also like you, even on those good days when you feel up for exercise, it often bites you afterward & you spend a couple of days paying for it with a major crash. It’s really frustrating figuring out how much is enough but not too much. I really envy all these other folks out riding their bikes & moving their bodies in powerful ways. Hopefully we’ll both get there again soon too! x

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    Trevor Otto Reply:

    I found that when I had cfs some twenty years ago that I had very little stamina but lifting medium weights was possible and beneficial to the lymphatic system which was in my case clogged and a major factor in my cfs. Eventually a Chinese iridoligist healer recommended a lot of vitamin C dissolved in water as well as eating fresh fruit which seemed to get my body back to normal.My sympathies to all with CFS,

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    Jane Reply:

    yes I attended a conference a couple of years ago and the guest speaker was Phillip Day from http://www.credence.org He had a lot to say about the benefits of Vit C and also Vit D..
    CFS/FM sufferers need to have their Vitamin D level checked out. Mine was very low…
    need to spend 10 min a day in the sun early in the morning exposing arms, legs, stomach…or take a good supplement

    well worth looking at his website. I have most of his books and can reconmend hearing him speak if he ever comes to your area. He lives in England and travels the world…

    MagicPuffin Reply:

    @Katherine I’m with you there totally, I get exhausted just going up the 20 stairs in my house after work. A walk to the end of the street can zonk me out for days, making turning up to work a feat. Sometimes just standing up from my desk and getting a glass of water is a drama. If it’s not fatigue, it’s pain.
    I can get a real stubborn streak and say to myself, just toughen up and get going, I recognise that now….its when I’m whipping my adrenals.
    It really feels like a road with no ending.
    I am a black belt in Ki Aikido, an art said to be more refined that classical ballet. I can’t even sit on the mat and bow in these days.
    I don’t even know where to start.

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    Jane Reply:

    I also was a sufferer of CFS and Fibromyalgia plus two other conditions. Exercise for me was impossible. I would pay dearly for it and spend the rest of the week trying to recover. For over 13 yrs I had been unable to do normal household duties. Ie cooking, cleaning, ironing, casual work, and even sex was out of the question. Too tired and exhausted. I tried many different remedies and products to no avail. However 5 months ago I read David Guillespies Sweet Poison book no 2. And got onto Sarahs website and followed her 8 wk plan. For me I am now free from those afflictions. I have so much energy, I power walk and have improved my strength and fitness level. I am cooking amazing new dishes thanks to all these sugar free recipes. I have a casual job and I love doing house work. And yes the sex is great !!
    I know for some sufferers with CFS lifestyle ‘food’ changes makes no difference. My heart goes out to you and anyone else who suffers from any kind of autoimmune illness. Persevere, don’t give in to it. Don’t allow it to rule your life or define who you are, it doesn’t have to be that way. Take care and be encouraged to take it a day at a time.

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    asha Reply:

    Hi Jane its encouraging to here what your saying. as i too have fibro and feel like i have no energy for anything. ie my kids .husband. i would lover a bit of my normal life back. so were there any other changes u did ? Did u go off sugar completely ? cheers asha

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    Two Modern Cavewomen Reply:

    Diet plays a HUGE part in CFS / FM / ME. That’s what our blog is 90% about, what we’re doing with food to try and fix us. I’ve noticed a huge change in what I can tolerate when I took wheat and almost all gluten out of my diet.

    Sugar is very much a ‘sometimes’ food for me as Elmo says. Play with your diet. You can make changes. Also check out Lee Holmes Supercharged Foods.

    Jane Reply:

    Hi Asha,

    I do believe it was mainly reducing the fructose and added sugar products. I also gave up bread and dairy milk. I had to push myself with the walking. I has to push past the pain barrier. It hurt, I did it slowly was committed and consistent. I also take super green powders every morning and magnesium powder every night before sleep, about an hr before hand. I also take organic apple cider vinager every morning upon rising. I reduced coffees to one or none a week. I drink hot water or hot water and lemon. Plus a lot of green tea. Completely of all sweets and high fructose foods.

    I made sure I walked every day rain sunshine whatever. I am 52 and have been sick for over 20 years. Only diagnosed 7 yrs ago. Fibromyalgia is horrific. The pain unbearable. But I have had none of that since embarking on this change of lifestyle.
    It would be interesting to see how I would cope under an enormous stressful situation. As stress is my trigger. So far I am handling raising 4 young adults who all live at home really well no break downs for me, no relapses. I also started to go chemical free with household products and makeup. Also reduced foods with preservatives And additives.

    Having a good network of girlfriends, a spiritual faith, determination and being kind to myself and putting me first helped enormously.
    Hope this helps if you want some resources contact me on jbache51@hotmail.com
    Happy to oblige

  • Margaret

    I love exercise for so many reasons. Because I sometimes don’t sleep well, I can wake up being a grumpy bitch. Exercise is my medicine that transforms me into a relatively pleasant person. ;)

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  • http://www.kellyexeter.com.au Kelly Exeter

    One of the biggest things I ever did in life was separating exercise from weight control in my mind. Nowadays I am the same as you do – I exercise for my mental health, for the instant clarity it brings, and for the fact that some of my best creative work is done while I run/walk :)

    See you at Problogger Sarah :)

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    will do!

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  • Cosi

    Absolutely, particularly exercise that challenges me like kayaking, open water swimming, trail running. Feeling strong, capable and independent as a young woman is a huge part of why I’m committed to being fit. I also find the discipline with exercise helps with discipline for writing. The clarity, calmness and strength I feel from exercise allows me to focus, create and negotiate times of writers block, self-doubt and fear.
    Murakami’s ‘What I talk about when I talk about running’ (2007) is also a wonderful read.

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  • Chloe

    It took me a while to make the connection between my mental state and my level of physical activity, but once I did it was powerful. My mood tends to sink a lot when I’m not exercising and my whole outlook on life becomes more negative. I think exercise is fundamental – like eating well and drinking lots water. Great post Sarah.

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  • Trish

    I find it really hard to get into a routine.
    I have anxiety and have done for a decade, and severity comes and goes. I find that I can establish routines but then I’ll get a bit worse, retract and drop everything. Probably not helpful that my anxiety manifests into agoraphobia so sometimes (like now) it is a battle just to do the stuff I have to do. I would like to change this, but not sure I have the energy or mental health to do so. Tomorrow will be a better day I’m sure & I’

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  • http://www.thekindcleaner.com.au/blog Paul – The Kind Little Blogger

    I think this is the right approach to exercise. Though, I don’t know whether repetition is the right thing for everybody–personally, I like to mix things up. Most people exercise with medium- to long-term outcomes in mind. It’s obvious why many then lose motivation. People want for instant gratification. By going in to become clean and clear, they are getting that in some way.

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  • Steph

    It’s a really interesting question. I used to be a competitive runner when I was younger (national-level, distance, so I trained a lot). I was much more emotionally out of whack and anxious back then than I am now and so I often wonder if the level of exercise that I was doing was throwing my hormones out of balance (not to mention the endorphin yo-yo-ing). These days, for a variety of reasons, my exercise tends to consist of walking – a half hour to the office and a half hour home at night – and a bit of biking on the weekends when I feel like it. So I guess my answer would be “depends how much.” The one thing though about NOT doing serious exercise that I would say is that there are lots of ways to experience focus without undertaking significant training. Even when I was kid, way before I ever took up athletics, I was extremely focused when I started making or doing something. My mother often despaired because I would go for hours without getting up from the table, eating, even going to the bathroom! There’s a key line to draw between benefiting from routine and obsessive compulsion! :)

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  • http://www.sparrowandsea.com Jess @ Sparow + Sea

    Sarah, have you read Murakami’s ‘What I talk about when I talk about running?’. It is, not surprisingly, pretty great. He certainly has a way with the word-wrangling!

    Joyce Carol Oates (she of the massively prolific oeuvre) says that running is integral to her writing process too. That any plot issues or stumbling blocks she is having are teased out whilst she is pounding the pavement. Her book ‘The Faith of a Writer’ is pretty interesting too…

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  • http://alliejwood.blogspot.com Ali

    I agree that with exercise – the focus shouldnt be on losing weight. it should be on gaining strength, clearing the mind and pushing your body to exhale bad energy.

    Ive been doing crossfit since the start of the year, and since starting it and running less i’ve become stronger, more confident, outgoing and relaxed. that energy i expel at the end of my work day calms my mind before i go home for the evening. I’m stronger, fitter and mentally more capable than what I was before I lifted weights. :)

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  • http://melissajaine.com/blog Melissa Jaine

    That’s it. You’ve convinced me.
    I’m a hopeless exerciser. Do not ask me to join a gym. Even the one at work that is only $5 a month or something very cheap.
    But this post hit home.
    Even just a walk, or simple yoga in the living room, you’ve convinced me to do something each day.
    Thank you!
    mel.x

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  • Mia Bluegirl

    I do yoga to become more flexible, more grounded and to lift my spirits.
    I do weights to lift my ass so it doesnt go flat from sitting on it all day.

    So I’m really only half vain…

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  • sahara

    couldn’t agree more sarah! it’s interesting that studies point to vigorous exercise working best. i’m an iyengar yoga teacher in training and a former runner. the running part at least defined my childhood and young adult life. it took me overseas to live and later on when i kissed competition goodbye, it became my mental and emotional outlet. going for a jog made me feel better, study better and enjoy life more in every way.
    when i joined a yoga teacher training program, my runners stayed in the cupboard. i’d heard too much about the (muscular) imbalances running created in my body and thought i needed to dedicate myself to the (yoga) practice if i were to be a teacher.
    i love yoga and everything it gives me in return. but it does affect me on a very different level to going out into the bush for a run or a hike. maybe it’s the rigorous bit?
    i look at my runners longingly whenever the shoe cupboard opens. they seem to call out to me and hit me somewhere deep in my soul. after my next yoga exam, i’m going to reward myself with a run. and plan to keep running and hope it doesn’t affect my teaching (or practice)!

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  • Natalie

    Hi Sarah,

    I love this post. I have always been a huge fan of yours and ever since embarking on my sugar-free lifestyle (about to hit the three week mark!) after reading your IQS e-book I have become even more of an avid follower of yours!

    I always try and do some exercise every day (generally just a 30 minute run) but have often hit the 5pm mark without having achieved much other than incidental exercise. Since reading that you (at a minimum) like to wake up and exercise for approx 20 minutes each morning simply to get the blood flowing, I have done the same. I have found that in conjunction with a sugar-free diet my energy levels have been much higher and I am much happier throughout the day. Productivity has increased drastically as well. As you suggest, the focus is less on weight-loss or fitness, but overall health – physical, mental and emotional.

    As an aside: I am interested in your thoughts on this article: http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/fancy-some-guiltfree-chocolate-20121009-27atr.html
    There seems to be too greater focus on fat content – having replaced fat, with fruit juice! Crazy!

    Thanks for being an amazing mentor.

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Natalie – I put some comments on the IQS FB page about it just now

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  • lizzie

    I’ve always exercised. Its why my Dr tells me I have a 25 yr old’s bone density at 45 and it allows me to eat more sometimes that I really should, but really I like it because it makes me happy. Interestingly, I just watched this video which shows that lack of exercise is shortening our children’s lives by 5 years… http://designedtomove.org

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  • http://westendgirl.ca Ariane

    Like Two Modern Cavewomen, my body doesn’t respond “normally” to exertion – I think this is common for folks with chronic fatigue issues. We don’t always get those nice chemicals in our brains, and it can be exhausting and even spark many days of fatigue if pushed to far (and some days even when not pushed too far).

    I try and exercise most days, but very lightly – a walk and/or light yoga at home. I’m hoping to get an electric assist bike so I can bike around too, as it’s quite hilly where I live. Keeping up light non-strenuous exercise really helps to manage chronic pain and keep me flexible and having a little bit of stamina, but I would love to have some better walking endurance yet.

    It’s really tough getting the right balance to keep the body feeling well without sparking fatigue spells. And it’s tough because everyone believes exercise is the answer to everything and always a good thing – saying just to do more and it’ll get better, but that’s not everyone’s reality!

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    Two Modern Cavewomen Reply:

    I just topped yesterdays 30 minute workout with my trainer off with a walk on the beach that normally would be a nice little stroll. By the end, lightheaded, finding it hard to catch my breath. The recovery on this one’s a killer, I’ll be taking it easy for a couple of days. It’s hard to know how much to do because the bloody line keeps moving!!! ;)

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    Ariane Reply:

    I feel you – I think that’s the most frustrating part, that it’s so inconsistent. What might be fine one day isn’t the next, so it’s very hard to know what is okay to do one day to the next!

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    Katherine Reply:

    I feel you girls. I commented above on Two Modern Cavewomen about my frustrations dealing with exercise/CFS. It’s definitely tough to know what’s right on which day…and I don’t know about you two, but I have a hard time keeping things slow & steady, so taking a slow 10 minute walk hardly seems worthwhile or possible because before I know it, I’m speed walking or going much longer & then pay the price later. I have a hard time slowing down in this way. Perhaps that’s the lesson of my health issues…don’t think I haven’t thought about that.

    Two Modern Cavewomen Reply:

    Katherine, I had this problem at the gym this week. Those endorphines kick in and all of a sudden you feel like you’re on top of the world and you can do anything, and for those few minutes you can, and then later, get dropped like a sack of potatoes.

    The uncertainty is frustrating.

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    Vanessa Reply:

    Hi Katherine

    I understand exactly how you feel, I also have CFS and exercise is really so difficult, the rush of adrenaline you get means you push yourself further than you can really manage, because it feels so good at the time!

    I found that pilates was the best form of exercise for me to gradually build up my strength, because the process of learning how to do it naturally keeps you at a slower pace but as you get better at it it becomes a more active workout. Two years ago I couldn’t even manage to hold my arms up long enough to wash my hair without needing a rest halfway through, and today i’m starting a course to become a pilates instructor!

  • http://www.realitychick.com.au Rachel @ Reality Chick

    Exercise is the best, best thing – it gives me an instant glow, helps me lose weight and boosts my creativity like nothing else. The trouble is… I just don’t do it enough and I have a total love/hate relationship with it, despite LOGICALLY knowing the benefits and knowing I’ll feel better if I do it.

    Working from home definitely makes it easier to fit it in, but when I’m on deadline for a story or a project EVERYTHING goes out the window. I want to make exercise the priority above all else, and an automatic thing like brushing my teeth, but I’m also a night owl and go to bed so late and then can’t get up and then the work day starts and I can’t tear myself away from the computer and then it’s 5pm and too late to go to the gym and time for dinner and… the whole silly, ridiculous, beat-myself-up cycle starts again.

    It’s a process…

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  • http://theteatray.wordpress.com/ Mary

    Finally! Someone put into words what I’d been trying to figure out on my own!

    I’d definitely agree with this. I did the City2Surf for the first time this year (not a huge distance, I know. But it was huge enough for me and my calves). By the end, I was left with this immense feeling of depth of mind and clarity of spirit from the psychological challenge of overcoming the physical. It was just bliss! One of those moments that crystallizes in your memory as a damn good achievement and something to hold up against future challenges for motivation.

    Exercise should be about moments like that. Every time. Celebrating a physical challenge, not an emotional punishment.

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  • Karla

    I’ve really been struggling for motivation lately in all facets of my life but I knew that something was really up when I didn’t want to exercise. I love exercising mostly because of the many benefits you mentioned above. This was an article I needed to read today. Thanks as always Sarah.

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    Elly Reply:

    Karla – we need get out into the bush and do a trail run together again.

    Sarah – I agree with everything you have written. My running completely cleanses my mind and makes me feel revived and refreshed. I ran today through rain, hail(!!) thunder, lightening, sunshine and saw a double rainbow. It was amazing for my spirit. Running for weightloss makes me feel bogged down. Running for clarity of mind makes me feel energised and inspired.

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  • http://holity.net Terri

    I have never been able to motivate myself to exercise with “losing weight” or “looking better”… but THIS might actually work!

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    It does!!

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  • Mia Bluegirl

    Here you go, an interesting overview of why excessive exercise is counterproductive.

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/why-you-shouldnt-burn-more-than-4000-calories-a-week-through-exercise/#axzz28xH8tt6D

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  • Kimberley

    I’m finding this trend of exercise-will-make-you-feel fantastic disconcerting. Read some of the above posts of people who are challenged with illness, still trying to push through.

    I have pushed through doing light exercise after four miscarriages . Ignoring what my body has been telling me. That it’s exhausted, depleted and yelling at me for rest and replenishment. And can’t function after each time I exercise…

    Finally I’ve had the ‘okay’ to stop when my health professional ordered no strenuous exercise AT ALL as iron, iodine, D, liver was so low..

    Is the evangelical nature of exercise-will-cure-all causing a collective ignoring of the signs our bodies give us in certain times in our lives? I for one, am released from the years of guilt. Instead am listening without guilt to what my body and doctor are telling me.

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  • Kimberley

    Is the evangelical nature of exercise-will-cure-all causing a collective ignoring of the signs our bodies give us in certain times in our lives? Read some of the above posts of people who are challenged with illness, still trying to push through.

    After four miscarriages and Ignoring my body needs, i try to exercise. I really do. But can’t function after each light exercise session…Climbing the stairs is like climbing a mountain.

    Finally I’ve had the ‘okay’ to stop when my health professional ordered no strenuous exercise AT ALL as iron, iodine, D, amongst others was so low and liver function so poor.

    I for one, am released from the years of guilt of what society and research says i should be doing.. Instead am listening without guilt to what my body and doctor are telling me.

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    Two Modern Cavewomen Reply:

    I’m one of the people who talked about having troubles exercising. On days when I can, it’s really good for me, but you have to listen to your body.

    There are days when I’ll start to exercise and my body will say “woohoo, let’s do this” and other days when my body will say “for the love of ….., please stop!!” and on those days I do.

    I had a 30 minute light boxing session at the gym Tuesday, felt great but struggling to recover. Yesterday, went for a beach walk for a few hundred metres, quite literally gasping for air and lightheaded. On any other day, it would have been fine :(

    The best thing you can do is to listen to your body and you don’t have to feel bad about not exercising if you truly can’t. To stop and listen is wise :)

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  • https://twitter.com/Java_Junkie71 Nicole

    Great post! And so true…
    One of the best things I did for myself was to forget about exercising purely for trying to lose weight, because I would get frustrated and give up when the numbers on the scale refused to budge (hooray for hypothyroidism! :-P). Now I try to get in some exercise after lunch (even if it’s just a 10-minute walk) because it helps to keep away the 2pm brain fog and puts me in a great frame of mind for when the kids get home from school. I’m sure my kids are happier coming home to a happy mummy instead of a grouchy one!

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  • http://www.fatblackcatspaw.wordpress.com mary

    I also have had ME in the past and when I started excercising again in the pool I started incredibly small ie I did 5 mins and very slowly over weeks an weeks built up to doing 15 mins. I do a lot of walking.

    And yes the mental benefits of walking beside the sea and just generally geting out are invaluable

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  • Kimberley

    Such lovely and wise women. Thanks. Decreasing volume in ‘should’ and increasing the vocal on instinct is a learning exercise.

    By way Sarah, when I said “evangelising” re exercising, I wasn’t referring to your post. More the general societal “push” ethos. Love your blogs!

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  • http://educatedderelicts.wordpress.com Courtney

    This is exactly the reminder I need right now. I’m a grad student and exercise has dropped off my agenda with a thesis to write and classes to attend.

    I must admit, weight and appearance motivate me more than immediate benefits, but now that you’ve got me thinking about it I’m going to consciously try and shift my perspective.

    Thanks, Sarah :)

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  • http://blog.isowhey.com.au ian chapman

    It’s good to see you talking about exercise Sarah. It is such a complex issue and different for so many people.

    I try and inspire people on my blog to simply be aware… aware of their diet, their movement, their body. It doesn’t really matter why you exercise – as long as you do – because you will get the benefits for the other reason as well.

    But for health reasons resistance exercise is so important, especially for women, to keep active into older age, surely a goal for everyone!

    Love ya work! :)

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  • tali k

    Does dancing in the kitchen count? I’m back to a seated practice after a long hiatus and finding taking any more time out impossible. I want to move for the sheer joy of being in mybody, not from a “should do” perspective.

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  • http://blog.isowhey.com.au ian chapman

    tTalli K – it is not a case of “should do’ – however, humans were designed to move – not sit around all day, but if you “want to” be healthy and active (whichever way you do it) into older age, you “have to” move and be active..simple as that!

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  • Jane

    Really enjoy reading everyone’s thoughts and learning new ideas. I have always has the mentality of exercising to lose weight. But now I will have a different mindset. I too enjoy walking. It helps clear the head and allows me to refocus and bring the daily struggles into proper perspective. I use it also as a time to bring difficult challenges that need to be dealt with to God and talk it over with him. I always finish a walk feeling like I can tackle the world head on. If I am feeling down like Sarah mentioned I just put the shoes on and get out that door and walk. Walking in the rain is Amazing !!! The best ever
    Love the blogs. Learning so much and have a long way to go. Thanx Sarah for keeping us informed on many different aspects of health and well being

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  • Lisa Ingram

    I was talking with my 18 yo son the other day re deperssion and anxiety and we concluded I exercise to meditate (empty head, no more esotericness) and he writes and draws. I have NO CLUE how to actually meditate (inside me its a running monologue, same with him) but exercise/other things get us to the empty head place. Must be why I am a gym bunny and he is a brill artist (go Jack).

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  • http://perrindrumm.com Perrin

    You’ve probably read Murakami’s “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running,” and if you haven’t you should give it a read. It’s all about balancing physical and creative dedication and how one feeds the other. I’m so envious of his routine. It’s been my goal for so long to be in bed at 9 or 10 and be up before the sun. I think it’s time to stop making excuses though and just stick to it, especially if I want to make good on my writing MFA and finally write my damn novel!

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  • Sharon in Philly

    I totally agree with exercising to help with headspace. I realise after reading this and all the comments that I’ve gotten away from exercising. I know it but for some reason I don’t use it so today I wasn’t in a good headspace so went to the gym. I’m feeling better and more able to concentrate on some reading for my studies. I need to remember that it limits stress and helps to work through problems, I’m especially going to need this as I get ready to move countries again while working and completing my thesis.

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  • Florence

    I’ve just “discovered” your blog and I’m amazed at how I feel concerned about your articles! This one about “exercising every day” talks a lot to me as daily exercise is what I’ve been trying (quite successfully) to do now for 2 years in order to feel better (backbone operations and as you Sarah, auto-immune disease). I use to say that “exercise in the morning” is something as essential as having a shower…I could’nt leave home in the morning whithout my morning shower… I couldn’t either start the day the same without exercising. It makes an incredible good job on my hurting bones and even if it is hard to get up earlier in the morning and sometimes boring to walk alone on my treadmill, I never regret it afterward, all the more it has an effect all day long!

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  • Ashleigh Hourigan

    The creative link is DEFINITELY there! I try to run 10km+ most days and I find as soon as I get back I want to blog, or write. I have shared this article on my fitness page, hopefully it’ll spur my clients on :)

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  • Ashleigh Hourigan

    and just quickly, I always seem to find an article on here randomly relevant to me, even if they’re from 2 years ago…

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