buy nothing new for a month

Posted on October 4th, 2012

If there is one thing I would truly love to inspire everyone around me to do…it’s to buy less. Everyone gets into decluttering and simplifying by buying great storage containers and having big cleanouts. But. Really. The only way to simplify your life and be responsible with your consumption – in many directions at once – is to buy less stuff in the first place. Including storage containers.

Image via Photography Inspiration

Buying less saves time, it saves headaches, it saves storage angst, it saves relationships, it saves money and it saves the planet. Honestly. There is no reason to be wasting as much as we do. The facts are these:

  • A 2005 paper from the Australia Institute by Clive Hamilton Richard Denniss and David Baker tells us “Aussies have admitted to spending over $10 billion every year on goods we do not use: clothes and shoes, CDs, DVDs and food, and approximately $7 billion of that is food.
  •  Each year in Australia nearly 20 million tonnes of waste goes to landfill. By way of comparison, this amount exceeds spending by Australian governments on universities and roads.

I appreciate not everyone can wear the same pair of green shorts almost every day for four years (actually, it’s been two pairs, same colour, same size, for eight years). Or go without buying anything for 13 months. But I reckon we can all last a month without going to the shops and purchasing. And I also reckon we will all love it when we do. I know we will. I worked this out a few years ago and live by it. Try it!

Which is my segue to this: October is Buy Nothing New month. I don’t need to spell out the gist, do I…but background guff:

  • funded by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and Sacred Heart Mission, it’s a Nation-wide campaign to try to get Aussies to cut down on our spending.
  • if you’re joining in, you can still buy food, drink, medication, and hygiene products during the Buy Nothing New campaign.

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE join me in not buying anything new. Yes?? The month has already started. No run-up. Time is nigh. Just. Don’t. Go. To. The. Shops. Easy.

Need some inspiration? How about these…

20 Tips for Buying Nothing New

* Buy second-hand clobber. Buy designer lables – second-hand – at these great outlets around the country. I bought the most amazing Christian Laboutin pink stiletto boots for $100 at BlueSpinach in Sydney…years before I knew what a red sole meant on the streets. eBay makes sharing of second hand goods easy and accessible. So does  Gumtree, and Freecycle, which is awesome – and free!

* Eat nothing in a packet: So says Eric Bana, another BNN ambassador. It’s the simplest motto for good eating, too. And for losing weight. Kill many birds with the same rock!

* Eat at Silo. Check out this fabulous cafe in Melbourne where they re-use EVERYTHING. Bravo to them.  I’ll be supporting the cause by running all my meetings while in Melbourne next week from here! Might see you there!

* OK. You’ll have to buy new food. Well, maybe not…try this ideas:

  • google ‘leftover recipes’ – you’ll be amazed at what you can do with leftovers!
  • shop to a specific list and buy only what you need.

* I cook in batches, using up the whole onion, the whole tin of tomatoes, all the beans. And I freeze what I don’t eat (which is more environmentally sound than storing the stuff in the fridge, anyway).

* When my veggies are looking lack-lustre, I make a big soup with lentils and bacon thrown in for flavour and protein. I stab-mix the lot. I juice fruit and beetroots and carrots. Or I make mish-mash meals.

* I don’t buy more until I’ve finished what I already have (in the fridge/pantry). I completely run out of yoghurt before I set out to buy another. That way I find myself then using up the last of the sour cream or cheese in the interim.

* For more, check out my thoughts on the love food hate waste campaign 

* Swap your clothes: Matt Paroz shared these tips on my blog a while back:

* If you’re in Melbourne October 8-12 check out The New Joneses – a family who will spend five days in a sustainable, pop-up apartment at FedSquare, entering in undies and bathrobes, bringing just the essentials and a scavenger list. Challenged to clothe themselves and fill their home with furniture, in the spirit of ‘new consumption’ The New Joneses will borrow, rent, swap or source their stuff second hand.

* Check out the local op-shop or weekend markets, or even the vintage section of Etsy.

* Try to source things second hand. Shop at charities like Brotherhood of St Laurence and Sacred Heart Mission, which extends the life of goods and supports our community.

Buy your books on line, second-hand… and help a charity.

* Share others’ power tools at openshed.com.au

Holiday in someones else’s pad with airbnb.com. I did all across Europe. Really, really easy and fun.

* Share a car with GoGet. You can read about my experiences with car-sharing here.

* Learn how to eat sustainably. Check out Sustainable Table for tips. And it’s a pretty website.

* Try some tips from Love Food Hate Waste. You’ll be wasting less food, saving the environment, and saving yourself some money.

* Learn how to make your own cleaning products from stuff in your pantry.

* Or, at the very least, buy your cleaning gear from Ecostore Australia.

To join Buy Nothing New month, take a pledge here with friends…

Tell me what you get up to…any clever ideas, swap meets, frock exchange links you love etc, and I’ll share here and on Twitter….

 

 

Related Posts with Thumbnails
  • http://taylahjoyce.blogspot.com Taylah

    This would be a lot easier if I weren’t graduating in 3 weeks and didn’t need a new dress. :(

    [Reply]

    K Reply:

    You can get one second hand? You don’t need a brand new, but a pretty second hand one would do the trick ;)

    [Reply]

    Jax Reply:

    I bought my beloved and pre-loved grad 70′s gown from a vintage store for $20. All it needed as a needle and thread to fix the embellishments. I wore it with my fave ‘going out’ shoes. My girlfriends and I got ready together, doing each others hair, nails and make up was heaps of fun. The best part was the hunt for the dress, going into a vintage shop gives you the licence for your own ‘trying on ridiculous’ outfits montage.

    Now I’m going to hunt down that dress in the back of the wardrobe and turn it into a summer frock.

    Enjoy the hunt!!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.aussieoverlanders.com.au Kirsty – AussieOverlanders

    Love that you are spreading this message Sarah.

    http://www.brotherhoodbooks.org.au is incredible

    To Taylah above – perhaps you can hit up etsy vintage or some of the links Sarah mentioned. Goodluck! x

    [Reply]

  • Stef
  • Rachel

    I can’t sing the praise of Freecycle loudly enough – it’s amazing what I’ve given away on it, to people who I know need or want the stuff I don’t want – books, furniture, a big outside umbrella, an old but still working printer, a cassette player, a roll of soft tape that physios use for making slings (leftover from a broken collar bone – the physios collecting a table and chairs took it too), a doggie door … I wouldn’t have been able to give some of it to charities (many won’t take electrical stuff and will only pick up on a day that suits them and it doesn’t suit me to sit at home all day to give something away) but Freecyclers will take anything.

    [Reply]

  • Laura

    Instead of buying books, go to the library! I love libraries. :)

    [Reply]

    grace b Reply:

    I totally agree! Whenever I go into a bookstore and have a look-round I just save the book titles that I like on my phone (it’s not even a smartphone–I just use the notepad tool) and then track them down at the library. I have a box of books that I don’t even read currently! Tsk Tsk.

    [Reply]

    Charlie Lunar Reply:

    Yep! I borrow so many things from the libraries around my city.

    DVDs, Books, CDs- you can also request they purchase certain library-related-things and the best thing is you know other people are going to be enjoying the same purchase too.

    I’m also love hard rubbish.
    I found the most beautiful old rocking chair a while ago that had been broken slightly. Chucked in a nail- sanded it down!

    Waste not!

    [Reply]

  • C

    Melbourne op shop tips:
    Brotherhood of St Laurence in the basement of Royal Arcade in the CBD (wonderful things, often new)
    St Johns in Toorak, tucked down a side street off the Toorak Village, tiny but always beautiful things (and the ladies who run the shop are delightful!)
    Vinnies in Auburn- amazing house things

    The wonderful book ‘Frugavore’ by Arabella Forge is so useful. And I swap things from my garden with friends (I’ll trade you this silverbeet for that rocket/parsley etc…although everyone always has too much mint!)

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    Love love love this post Sarah.

    Some more ideas:
    1. Go to the library – especially the toy library for kids!
    2. Unsubscribe to all LivingSocial / Groupon / Catch of the Day type emails – just because something is a bargain doesn’t mean you need it.
    3. Specify on birthday party invitations – “no presents please”. Just get your friends to shout you a drink instead!
    4. Save up for the best of something. For example, I’m regretting buying a cheap camera lens because now I want to upgrade. I should have just saved up and got the best one to start with.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Reply:

    I love number 4!! thats a great plan

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    YES. Number 4 is the best! It’s easier to buy less if you love it more, and have it longer.

    [Reply]

    Two Modern Cavewomen Reply:

    My shopping motto has always been “it’s not a bargain unless you wanted one anyway”.

    [Reply]

    Ange Reply:

    Totally agree – I desperately needed a new mattress for my bed, but I wanted to get a really good one. I’ve been thinking about it for over a year now but wasn’t going to hand over the money unless I could get a good deal, then one morning I heard on the radio that a store (that I never shop in usually..) was having a 50% off sale on mattresses for that weekend. I was there within the hour and a week later it arrived and I have been sleeping on a cloud ever since. Best sleep I’ve had in years (I have a bad back & would regularly wake up with numb arms and hips on the old mattress) and while it still cost me a lot of money for the mattress, I look at it as a bargain and a 15 year investment in good sleep!

    [Reply]

    Nicole Reply:

    My motto applies to #4 – buy cheap, buy twice.
    Life is better having quality not quantity.

    [Reply]

    Liz Reply:

    My husband is a HUGE proponent of this and I have lost track of the number of times I have said quietly under my breath, “He’s right!”. :) It’s weird, but his mother is the exact opposite and thus has 3/4 of her and my FIL’s wall in wardrobe as well as the entire wardrobe in one of their spare rooms!! She cannot turn down a bargain, but has so many clothes she’s barely even worn. I should mention this challenge to her :)

    [Reply]

    Lisa Ingram Reply:

    Oh yes. Number 4. Saucepans. FINALLY got some good ones with riveted on handles not screws or spot welds. Bargains? Nope, the others just fell to bits in the end, even Scanpan. Less is more! – I am positive this is my last and final buy for something pretty necessary. Lisa

    [Reply]

  • http://www.littleadelaidekate.com Kate

    Very cool message- last year I went on a full 12 months of purchasing only second hand and fair trade clothing- was easier than you’d think! My wardrobe is now filled with much better quality, guilt-free treasures :)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.twomoderncavewomen.com.au Two Modern Cavewomen

    I’ve been reading a new book called Food Shock (due out next month) after being given a preview copy of it. (www.foodshock.com.au).

    150 years ago, we spent half our income on food & clothes (most of it on food). Today, 14 cents in the dollar gets spent on food, and the farmer gets only 2 cents of that money.

    We spend a large portion of the rest of it by surrounding ourselves with things we don’t need. An aquaintance of mine recently said how she was grateful for the government subsidy she got for her kids because it meant they could afford to go on an extra cruise once a year. I politely explained that perhaps that money could be better spent somewhere other than her way, and she thought that they were entitled to it and that life should be easy. Too many people have way too much and are over entitled.

    I now have a home (that the bank owns) and a nice business and each month I give money to the School Of St Jude in Tanzania. Gemma Sisia sure knows how to get a LOT out a small amount of money. (I’m waffling now :)!!)

    A few days ago I did buy myself a gift, that I saved up for too! A garmin watch with GPS so when I walk on the beach I know how far I’m walking and at what speed. It’s like being on a treadmill, but at the beach. I’m so glad I got that one in before October started ;)

    [Reply]

    UK Reply:

    But isn’t someone elses cruise your GPS watch? Some might argue your money could have been “better spent elsewhere” – it’s individual choice though isn’t it? Yes “too many people have way too much and are over entitled”, but I’m afraid you seem to contradict yourself there by admitting to buying a GPS watch :)

    [Reply]

    Two Modern Cavewomen Reply:

    Not quite the point I was making. I earn my money, my friend was using government subsidies to go on an EXTRA cruise each year, and when I suggested perhaps they didn’t need the government handout, she said “But it makes liek so much easier”. I bet it does. It’s THAT kind of thinking, that people need EVERYTHING, that’s the problem, not me saving up for a little treat that’s going to allow me to get out in the fresh air and walk without pushing the boundaries too far.

    While I do love the concept of living frugally, and I do it a fair bit of the time myself, when I get a couple of thousand dollars in my personal kitty, I feel obliged to spend a bit to keep the economy going, in the same way I pay someone to come wash my dogs, clean my house and do my lawns because my health doesn’t allow me to do all that and work as well. Like it or not, we also have an economy to keep moving.

    I absolutely refuse to shop from overseas onlines stores unless it’s something I can’t buy here and I won’t go and try something on in a shop and buy it online, that’s just plain rude. Being frugal is great, doing it at the expense of honest people trying really hard to make a living and create jobs is wrong.

    [Reply]

    belindab Reply:

    In your opinion, yes. We are each driven to do what we do our own way. You sound like you do a lot of great, socially-conscious, environmentally-sound stuff. Laying off the judgement of how others’ make their choices would free up energy to do even more!

  • http://www.twomoderncavewomen.com.au Two Modern Cavewomen

    Ecostore cleaning products are awesome. The cream cleanser can help you get calcium build up off glass in the shower and also cut through grease & grime on your kitchen stove top as well as cleaning basins. It’s a really great multi-use product that’s overlooked.

    I also use the dishwasher tablets and the laundry powder works great. If you’re lucky enough to have a Woolies near by, most of them sell it.

    [Reply]

  • Nicky

    Can I suggest that instead of plugging a chain that people support local, independent tailors if they can find them. They are around. My local tailor is a lovely old italian dude. Very old school and very reasonable. I hate the thought of people like him losing out to chains.

    [Reply]

    Steph Reply:

    Looksmart is actually a franchise – each one is run by an individual small business owner.

    [Reply]

    Nicky Reply:

    Yes but that’s still not wholly independent. I just looked up the closest LookSmart to where I live and I can see there’s one in Westfield Bondi Junction. My tailor Tony is also in BJ but up a little lane way where his rent is presumably much cheaper. Local. Old school. Not in Westfield. You can’t argue that supporting him is not better in many ways.

    [Reply]

    seeker Reply:

    I’d love to support your tailor Nicky, and also live in the area …. what are his details, I will defo check him out. Thanks for the suggestion. :)

    Nicky Reply:

    Oh that’s great! You go up some stairs to reach him.
    Above news agency, right near Fitness First.He does a wonderful job.

    Level 1, 114 Spring St
    Bondi Junction
    9387 4061

  • http://www.mypoppet.blogspot.com cintia

    I tend to live by the buy nothing new philosophy as much as I can, it’s incredible how much money you save when you don’t spend on trivial things and follow trends. The Op shop is my favorite place.

    I love re-fashioning existing unwanted garments into new outfits http://mypoppet.blogspot.com.au/2012/09/how-to-one-hour-dress.html

    I also written a whole ebook about making gifts with just fabric scraps. Waste not, want not!
    http://mypoppet.blogspot.com.au/2012/09/six-baby-gifts-to-make-with-fabric.html

    [Reply]

  • http://www.nomorepastrami.com Nomorepastrami

    Great read Sarah thank you. One of the best things I did that minimises our food waste is to buy a smaller fridge. I had been wishing our old fridge to die so I could go out and buy one of those swanky french door numbers, or at least a super big family size one. When the fridge did die space restrictions meant the big swanky number wouldn’t fit in without some remodelling of the adjoining cupboards. Begrudgingly I got a medium sized fridge and I love it. Nothing gets lost at the back, I use up everything before it gets replaced and I can see at a glance what needs to be used before it goes off!

    [Reply]

  • UK

    Thanks Sarah, this has given me the kick up the bum I needed – I usually try to live simply, but then fall of the rails and end up buying excess rubbish (whether clothes, food or bits and pieces). This is one of my favourite quotes, although I’m not sure who its by:

    “Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes. working jobs we hate, so we can buy shit we don’t need [to impress people we don't like].”

    [Reply]

    seeker Reply:

    LIKE! :)

    [Reply]

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    It’s been misquoted from the movie Fight Club.

    “Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy shit we don’t need. We’re the middle children of history, man. No purpose or place. We have no Great War. No Great Depression. Our Great War’s a spiritual war… our Great Depression is our lives. We’ve all been raised on television to believe that one day we’d all be millionaires, and movie gods, and rock stars. But we won’t. And we’re slowly learning that fact. And we’re very, very pissed off.”

    Great movie, check it out.

    [Reply]

    Elle Reply:

    I have heard it came from someone who worked in advertising back in the 50s or 60s..

    [Reply]

  • http://www.cerebralexcrement.com.au elissa c

    I’m so glad to see you promoting Buy Nothing New Month.

    [Reply]

  • http://happysugarhabits.com Laura

    I really like this frugal thinking post and totally want to cut down on my consumption :) I am learning to appreciate all my clothes with different accessory combinations to make it feel like I have a new outfit each time…or borrow off friends who seem to enjoy styling me anyway!

    Another tip…If you live with someone i.e. a flatmate, you can always let them know if you don’t think you will eat something up and ask if they want some or if you have a flatmate who is bad at wasting food (as I once had) I would know when she had forgotten about stuff and ask if I could use it up, which she was pleased when I did!

    Also eggs never go off when their sell by date says, they usually last for aaaggges!! lol

    [Reply]

  • Naz

    I feel like I’ve been living this way since I moved to the States. I find it increasingly hard to buy things because I keep thinking what will I do with this stuff when it comes time to leaving. It’s hard being in a place where you don’t know exactly how long you’ll be there for but at the same time you still have to live.

    I pretty much have all my essentials now and in terms of things like clothing, makeup etc well since everything is so much cheaper here than in Aus it’s hard to step away but again I stop myself because well… I don’t NEED that extra pair of shoes or the latest face cream. I buy as you do Sarah, when I run out.

    And if I really want something then as Kate says above I save for the best of something.

    So even though I’m not in Aus I will still aim to participate in this challenge!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.arthousehomelife.com alison

    Hi Sarah

    I wholeheartedly agree with you and agree that lowering consumption actually makes you happier.

    A friend an I went without anything new for 6 months, and it was liberating. Have been thinking it’s time to get back on the wagon and this post has convinced me.

    Thanks for the reminder.

    Alison

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    I know these involve buying but they are a great idea for not having to buy zip lock bags:

    http://www.thekitchn.com/15-reusable-washable-sandwich-bags-product-roundup-177314

    [Reply]

  • Mel

    I’m not sure if anyone has mentioned this before but the biggest food wasteage I used to have was vegetables going off, forgotten or squashed in the bottom draw. The top shelf in our fridge is now plastic containers of different sizes for veggies. They are the first thing you see when you open the door, they stay fresher and now we never waste anything. I’ve found this method really good.

    [Reply]

    Ange Reply:

    Me too Mel, and my veg purchased from the local farmers Markets (southside markets in Canberra) lasts 2-3 weeks all containerised, unlike soggy grocery veg which is mouldy in a few days. I like to know that the people I’m buying my veg off grow it too. Ditto meat, fish and eggs (oh and the eggs are fabulous!!!!)
    I have a bunch of gorgeous friends and we swap things that we don’t need, I swapped a huge cast iron casserole dish (I am single and you could cook for 10 in it) for a couple of those funky (but expensive) tupperware vege storers for the fridge. She’s stoked as she can now do big family cook ups, I have reclaimed space in my cupboard and no longer lament an expensive impulse purchase that I never used and I have scored some tupepeware that I needed and use daily, without forking out. We do the same with our clothes or after any type of cleanout. I got a free little analogue TV and relatively new expensive Sony DVD player from work as they were tossing them out after upgrading. I don’t have a big lounge room TV (I’m studying and my junk TV addiction was interfering with my sleep), but it’s a nice indulgence to hook up the TV every now and then to spend the weekend watching DVD’s or a TV series that I’ve missed. And it was all free – awesome!!
    I also have a friend that is an excellent seamstress. So often I’ll buy a full price dress or skirt and if the pattern really suits me I’ll ask her to whip me up a couple in different fabrics. (or from op shop clothes with funky patterns but horrid cuts that we pull apart). I repay her by cooking us all dinner or giving her some seedlings for her garden.

    [Reply]

    UK Reply:

    That sounds so cool, thank you for the tips! (I would like a seamstress friend!)

    [Reply]

  • http://takeawaysonthecouch.blogspot.com Wendalls

    Don’t forget the library for books and magazines :)

    [Reply]

  • Kayla

    I’ve been on a ‘buy nothing new challenge’ for this entire year and the longer it goes on the easier and more enjoyable I find it. I have saved a lot money, have learnt to make new outfits from clothes I already have just by putting in a bit of extra effort and creativity and have found heaps of amazing and cheap garments from Op shops and markets. It’s so satisfying to get a compliment on a $6 second hand dress! I always tell people where I get my clothes from in the hope they get inspired to do the same. My main motivation to take on this challenge was to live a more sustainable, enviro-friendly lifestyle and the benefits just keep coming. I’m also using the library much more now rather than buying cheap books online or at discount stores. I look forward to my monthly trip there to get some new books and magazines, have a chat with the librarians and check the local noticeboards. I doubt I’ll go back to my old ways of mindless spending.

    [Reply]

  • Jack

    * Eat nothing in a packet: So says Eric Bana, another BNN ambassador. It’s the simplest motto for good eating, too. And for losing weight. Kill many birds with the same rock!

    I absolutely love that! I am involved in the fitness industry and people always ask me what should and shouldn’t I eat and I always say the easiest principle of food is if it comes in a packet or has a food label it’s not food.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: Bits and pieces from around town | inkfilledsky

  • http://gladysinthegarden.blogspot.com sarah

    Yay, I found a blogger who did this challenge last year and I knew I’d want to participate one day. I actually thought about this at the beginning of October and was going to google to see if it was happening again this year, then I found your blog post. I signed up straight away. I am so motivated, and quietly glad thrifting is still ok.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.carlacoulson.com Carla Coulson

    Sarah some fabulous tips there and great advice for all. We have been lowering waste in our house and only major shop once a week and cook what is seasonal and fresh. Must admit I have had the odd purchase over the years from Blue Spinach as I just lived up the road……not fortunate enough to snag a pair of Laboutin’s though!
    Carla x

    [Reply]

  • Natalya

    .Bookcrossing is a wonderful and whimsical way to get rid of ( and source) a good read. Think of it as giving your old books a holiday! Here’s a copy and paste from the WIki page- .

    BookCrossing (also BC, BCing or BXing) is defined as “the practice of leaving a book in a public place to be picked up and read by others, who then do likewise.” The term is derived from bookcrossing.com, a free online book club which was founded to encourage the practice, aiming to “make the whole world a library.”

    The ‘crossing’ or exchanging of books may take any of a number of forms, including wild-releasing books in public, direct swaps with other members of the websites, or “book rings” in which books travel in a set order to participants who want to read a certain book. The community aspect of BookCrossing.com has grown and expanded in ways that were not expected at the outset, in the form of blog or forum discussions, mailing lists and annual conventions throughout the world.
    . Happy ( and sustainable) reading!

    [Reply]

  • amber

    As a retailer who employs 8 gorgeous staff I implore you to not stop shopping as things are really tough at the moment but maybe think twice before that impulse purchase.

    Support local shops rather than cruising the web( and spending more time behind a computer) as there is nothing nicer than popping down to the local shop on a Saturday morning and being inspired by ever changing displays and product. I think you’ll find most small business owners are more than happy for you to get ideas from them and use things you already have to recreate a look. And I think you’ll find they are a great source of information on whats great locally. When the next school fete is on, best place for a coffee, where charity bins are located which leads me to my next suggestion…

    Maybe donate something to charity every time you buy or receive something new? With Christmas fast approaching its a great time to boost the inventory of your local St Vinnies.

    x

    [Reply]

  • http://thezeka.tumblr.com/ Ana

    Are those “ease-in” tips or tips for those who are doing it fully?

    I don’t see them working as anything but the former, and even then… a bit too much of ‘buy… buy… buy…’ when the article started by stating we can only declutter by not cluttering further.

    Second-hand, yes, but still clutter.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.twomoderncavewomen.com.au Two Modern Cavewomen

    You know, I’m in 2 minds about this one. I think if you earn good money, you have a responsibility to the economy. I’m lucky enough to be self employed DINK and yesterday I blew $500 on new clothes at Lorna Jane.

    If I don’t shop, people don’t have businesses, your teenage kids don’t get that part time job that we all did in the 80′s (me anyway). I also give a sizeable chunk of money to charity each month, mainly 3rd world countries and for kids who can’t get food, water or an education.

    I’m in retail too, and if people stop spending with me, there’s a few people out of work, me included. I think going in to debt and buying things you don’t really need is silly, and I don’t get sucked in to sales for the fun of it.

    You know what I think the biggest burdern on all this is, Christmas. It’s an overly commercial obligation for people to spend money they don’t have so as not to offend people (for the most part). I have bowed out of Christmas and I buy my family goats for third world countries and deposit money in to Kiva accounts for microlending instead.

    Any other http://www.kiva.org users here? Lending $25 to a goat farmer in a 3rd world country makes you feel a little warm inside.

    [Reply]

    Natalya Reply:

    I think that the ‘BuyNothingNew’ philosophy is for people from any socio economic strata. The idea that working members of the community , and by extension, cashed up members of our communities are somewhow more entitled isn’t really in keeping with the community minded thinking of BuyNothingMonth,
    Copy and pasted from the BuyNothingNew Australian website ->
    Buy Nothing New Month isn’t Buy Nothing New Never. Nor is it about going without.

    It’s literally about taking one month off to really think, “Do I really need it?” If I do, “can I get it second-hand, borrow it or rent it? What are my alternatives? Can I borrow from a friend? Can I swap with my neighbor?”

    It’s about thinking where our stuff comes from (finite resources) and where it goes when we’re done (often landfill) and what are the fantastic alternatives out there to extend the life of our ‘stuff’.

    It’s easy. It’s fun. It’s moving from consumption-driven to community-driven.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: Support Buy Nothing New Month and Win $200 Worth of ecostore Goodies! « ecostore Blog Australia

  • Nicole

    Boy I wish I saw this before I moved into college.
    My roommates and I started off the school year with a bang and online-shopped our way into materialistic oblivion. I now have a lot less money in my checking account all because of a few pairs of jeans and a sweater or two. I far too often fall into the sale trap, where I buy things I don’t need just because they’re marked down. I really need to try hard to not buy anything new since I don’t have a steady source of income right now. Also, I can shift that focus to school and hopefully excel in my classes. Thank you Sarah! This is exactly what I needed to read!

    [Reply]

  • Natalya

    Oops, typo in previous post. Line 5 should have read BuyNOthingNew month instead of BuyNothingMonth.

    [Reply]

  • http://alittlevoice.wordpress.com Jen

    I bought no new clothing for a year and while at times it was difficult and frustrating, I came out of it with a better idea of my personal style, and an appreciation for simplicity and quality. It’d be interesting to go without absolutely any new things for an month!

    [Reply]

  • http://www' Emmica

    I love this initiative! Although I’m an avid second hand shopper, since living in Sydney I have definitely bought more new clothes than ever before. This will be a great exercise to get me back into my old rhythm! I’ve started writing about it here: http://bit.ly/QLUdZK : )

    [Reply]

  • http://www.onepaperbagprincess.com Emmica

    Oops me webpage didn’t enter correctly, here I am again : )

    [Reply]

  • http://smshesmscom cris gayle

    Hi

    i am Powerconsultant support, i can provide you support in

    your powermta setup in

    i can do

    • Installing PowerMTA
    • License Activation
    • Installing and configuring DNS
    • Configuring Virtual-MTA
    • Max-message-rate
    • Max-message-per-connection
    • Define bounce after
    • Define Retry Domain on particular time period
    • Giving access on web for monitoring purpose
    • Define HTTP management Port
    • Configure SMTP username and password
    • Configure SMTP port
    • Increase PowerMTA queues
    • Reload PowerMTA configuration file
    • How to debug PowerMTA
    • Generate SPF and DKIM
    • Publish SPF and DKIM on DNS
    • Define DKIM on PowerMTA
    • How to connect Interspire applications or other

    application
    • Start, Pause and delete queue on PowerMTA
    • Delete particular queue on PowerMTA
    • Checking powerMTA log
    • How to check IP and Domain blacklist
    • Delist your IP And domain

    for more info mail me: smshesms@gmail.com

    [Reply]

  • Munna

    Hi

    we have PowerMta Video tutorial in this we cover these topics

    The topics which we covered in this video tutorial
    • Introduction of Power MTA
    • Installing PowerMTA
    • License Activation
    • Installing and configuring DNS
    • Features of PowerMTA
    • Configuring Virtual-MTA
    • Max-message-rate
    • Max-message-per-connection
    • Define bounce after
    • Define Retry Domain on particular time period
    • Giving access on web for monitoring purpose
    • Define HTTP management Port
    • Configure SMTP username and password
    • Configure SMTP port
    • Increase PowerMTA queues
    • Reload PowerMTA configuration file
    • How to debug PowerMTA
    • Generate SPF and DKIM
    • Publish SPF and DKIM on DNS
    • Define DKIM on PowerMTA
    • How to connect Interspire applications or other application
    • Start, Pause and delete queue on PowerMTA
    • Delete particular queue on PowerMTA
    • Checking powerMTA log
    • How to check IP and Domain blacklist
    • Delist your IP And domain

    for more info mail me: smshesms@gmail.com

    [Reply]

  • http://www.mozo.com.au Kevin Boyle

    One of our own has been blogging on Buy Nothing New month as well and found some pretty awesome lessons. http://bit.ly/PyBG6c

    It’s a great cause , hope we see this turn into something big one day.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: I’m Going On A Beauty Buy Ban For 30 Days » Beauty Box

  • Pingback: Minimalise And Make $2000 | Aussie Overlanders

  • http://www.prairiestateoutdoors.com/forums/member/240667/ wellness

    This spice even has the ability to heal wounds faster and repair
    already damaged skin. Extreme Inner Hemorrhaging – A few of
    the symptoms are usually blurred vision, slurred or perhaps
    slow speech, headaches and also numbness. Set the basil leaves on
    top, and one prawn on each leaf.

    [Reply]

  • http://viplab.if.its.ac.id/stki/?p=3 turmeric

    For acute cold and cough, turmeric paste is applied in the forehead
    before going to bed. Moreover Alzheimer’s disease is considered very rare in India. Sauces, breads, crackers, and other “nonsweet” foods that contain hidden sweeteners (not only sugar but high fructose syrup and corn syrup appears often on ingredient lists).

    [Reply]

  • http://rasatimaani.wordpress.com/2013/04/11/cultural-co-existence/ Green Coffee Optimum

    Hey! This post couldn’t be written any better! Reading through this post reminds me of my good old room mate! He always kept chatting about this. I will forward this write-up to him. Fairly certain he will have a good read. Thank you for sharing!

    [Reply]

  • http://wiki.sekine.com/index.php/%E5%88%A9%E7%94%A8%E8%80%85:MathewBla grapeseed benefits

    I can understand your confusion so let me explain
    how grapeseed oil benefits the skin compared
    to natural essential oils. In foods the oil is used in salad dressings, deep frying, baking and the seeds are used for wine making.
    Grapeseed oil, as the name suggests, is pressed form
    the seeds of grapes.

    [Reply]

  • http://nosugarmorespice.wordpress.com/2013/03/20/zucchini-himalayan-wild-rice/ Bridget

    That is a great tip especially to those fresh to the blogosphere.
    Short but very accurate information… Thanks for sharing this one.
    A must read post!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.trutheye.com/ibrahimawaad.com/userinfo.php?uid=6227 jojoba oil

    The absolute best way to truly get rid of acne is through a natural, healthy, and happy lifestyle.

    Jojoba treatment can get rid of acne pimples,
    eliminate the eruption of acne and clear impurities. Deep conditioning or hot oil
    treatments from a salon can help combat the
    problem but it is also expensive and time consuming.

    [Reply]

  • http://romantis-n-love.blogspot.com/2009/05/how-to-get-your-twin-flame-to-talk-to.html?m=1 Natural Cleanse Diets

    With havin so much content do you ever run into any issues
    of plagorism or copyright infringement? My website has a
    lot of exclusive content I’ve either written myself or outsourced but it seems a lot of it is popping it up all over the web without my authorization. Do you know any methods to help prevent content from being ripped off? I’d
    truly appreciate it.

    [Reply]

  • http://lenaswn.soup.io/post/317307696/Need-Help-With-Weight-Loss-Then-Try paleo diet ebook

    Proponents of the paleolithic diet believe that the healthiest and most appropriate foods for us to eat are simple, unprocessed foods similar to
    the ones that were consumed by our early hunter-gatherer ancestors during the Paleolithic period.
    Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, soft drinks and other junk foods are considered,
    ‘empty calories’. Such meal plan given can also be stretched to
    4 or 5 weeks easily but there are chances to have leftovers for
    some lunches and dinners.

    [Reply]

  • http://dedetannazzo7975c.wordpress.com/2013/06/04/iphone-it-is-not-as-complicated-as-it-looks/ Skye

    Furthermore, ask the shop depending on if they award a warranty
    for their repair aids. More than 200 docs and analysts had been mixed up in
    WTR undertaking. Are the radio waves produced by the Bluetooth stereo hazardous.

    [Reply]

  • http://natureblognetwork.com/index.php?a=stats&u=windypilcher Bart

    Several attempts by landscape maintenance companies produced disappointing results.
    For some, there are people that go to nature to re-energize their body
    and their souls. You may choose which plant would appear excellent at a selected
    stain.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: Nothing New For Me - picklebums.com

  • http://www.gems-tech.se/general-electromagnetic-solvers Brandon

    Hello my family member! I wish to say that this post is awesome, nice written
    and include approximately all vital infos. I would like to look
    more posts like this .

    [Reply]