how to quit sugar in the New Year

Posted on December 31st, 2012

Perhaps you’re playing with the idea of quitting sugar for 2013. To get well. And bright. And happy. Yes?

Diptic

Some of the treats I invite you to eat when you quit sugar. Clockwise from top left: bacon and egg cupcakes, avocado and coconut water popsicles, almond butter bark, crunchy nut cheesecake, berry pie, coco nutty granola.

Look, I’m not one to to sell in things with fanfare. I will simply say: quitting sugar works. And then I will gently invite you: to try it for yourself. How does it work? What will it take? How do you do it?

1. Eat fat. And wine.

Yes, my I Quit Sugar program requires you to eat more haloumi cheese and meat (if you’re not vegan or vego), macadamia nuts, homemade chocolate, coconut, and avocado popsicles. And, yes, you can still drink wine and beer and some spirits (in case you’re worried).

2. Don’t diet.

I hate diets. Quitting sugar is not a diet. It’s not miserable, you eat more, you eat without guilt. And it’s not a fad; I don’t do fads either.

It’s about cutting out processed food and eating like our grandmother’s used to. Simple. Non-faddish.

3. Know that you will lose weight.

Some people lose 2kg. Some lose 55kg. By eating more. Weight loss is not the focus, though. Because watching your weight doesn’t work. Instead when you quit sugar you focus on just feeling GOOD. Like REALLY GOOD. Clear skin, clear mood, brighter outlook…things that can be “watched” and experienced within days of quitting.

4. Buy the I Quit Sugar: 8-Week Program.

gb

The ebook – for reading on your computer or eReader (you get all formats for the same price) – walks you through the most effective techniques for getting off sugar and losing weight, week-by-week.

5. Better, take advantage of the I Quit Sugar Detox Bundle Deal.

The I Quit Sugar: 8-Week Program PLUS The I Quit Sugar Cookbook for $29.

bundle

6. Know you’re not locked in.

You can get a full refund within 30 days, if you just don’t like it. I don’t want anyone feeling obliged. About anything.

7. Allow 8 weeks.

The “8-Week Program” bit in the title of my book should give it away: it takes two months to get your result. That’s how long it will take to get sugar out of your system and for your body to find natural appetite. After that you can choose to go back to eating sugar or to move forward eating a little sugar (fruit and some occasional dark chocolate) – but not in an addictive, pscyho way. Or you can choose to stay off it completely.

But, yes, you’ll be able to choose. You’ll be free.

8. Join the IQS Community.

Ask questions, share your thoughts, get feedback via:

* The I Quit Sugar Facebook page.

* By signing up to the I Quit Sugar newsletter (and get notified of giveaways and offers)

9. Ask me any questions you might have.

Post below and I’ll answer before you try it out.

Related Posts with Thumbnails
  • JENNIFER BLEGG

    I would like hard copy of I quit sugar where and when will it be available

    [Reply]

    Kay Reply:

    I believe it will be released around January 24

    Details are in this post: http://www.sarahwilson.com.au/2012/12/the-i-quit-sugar-cookbook-in-hard-copy/

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Thanks Kay, and yep, you’re right. You’ll be able to advance purchase from this site in a week or so!

    [Reply]

    livia Reply:

    Hi Sarah,

    The book that will be released o 24 Jan is just the cookbook, not the actual IQS book, is that right?

    Thanks.

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    it’s a combo of both….ish

    Sabina Reply:

    Hi Sarah
    What is the difference between purchasing the 8 week program and buying the new book? What is the added value of purchasing the discounted ebooks along with the new book? Also when you talk about quitting sugar are you also talking about quitting sweeteners such as panela and rapadura and stevia, coconut sugar, banana sugar etc? Many thanks.

    Monique Reply:

    Hi

    I have just about to start the 8 week IQS program and thought i’d post this blog i stumbled across on Gill Stannard’s newsletter.
    http://mynewroots.blogspot.com.au/

    It looks as though there is no sugar in the recipes on blog so far. Maybe they are ones to introduce after 8 weeks. I’m not sure yet as i am a bit of a novice.

    Bye
    Monique

    [Reply]

    jenny Reply:

    can I have some sort of sweetener in my coffee? I truly love coffee. do you provide any suggestions on where to source some alternative products. I would ideally love a good online one stop shop for healthy and organic produce, somewhat affordable.
    thanks

    [Reply]

  • Ali

    I love this concept but really don’t know if I could do it. Where do I find out more?

    [Reply]

    Kylie Reply:

    Ali I was recommended here by a friend, but spent some helpful time firstly going back through the blog for background info, philosophy, research, etc.
    Try some recipes, and do also read people’s comments – so many experiences shared for you to be able to make up your mind.
    (But, seriously, do it!)

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Ali, As Kylie says below, read through some of my blog posts, or check out my facebook page (the IQS one that I link to above). You can read what others have said about the experience. About 70,000 people have done the program now.

    [Reply]

  • Courtney

    I have to say to anyone who has any reservations about qitting sugar – try it! You will not look back. I was, as Sarah describes it, a psycho sugar addict. I love to bake and create delicious sweet treats. But I knew my poor body was suffering. I have now been sugar free for nearly three months solid and I feel amazing! My skin looks brighter, my face has slimmed (along with other areas of my body!), I have no bloating (which used to be a chronic problem for me) and I find all the support, ideas and stories from Sarah and the IQS community really encouraging and inspiring. It’s definitely not a fad or a diet. This is just a new way of eating and a new, positive philosophy on life. My friend keep asking when I will “go back to normal food” and I tell them this is my normal now! Trust me, you will feel amazing!!

    [Reply]

    Courtney_9 Reply:

    Hi Courtney,
    I am a ‘psycho sugar addict’ too. Couple quick questions.. how long did you do the ‘detox faze’ of no sugar? What symptoms did you get and finally, did you just wake up one day with no symptoms of death and didn’t have a sugar craving/headache? Will i just magically not want sugar after this phase?

    I am preparing myself, I’m planning to start Feb 1 when i come back from Thailand. I am in the process of detaching myself, taking note of my sugar cravings and times and coming to terms with the fact that i need to stop. I’m ready.

    Thanks :)

    [Reply]

    Steph Reply:

    I was obsessed in the same way. I am the worst person when it comes to will power, every eating plan and exercise plan i have every started never lasted more then a couple of days. Until this. I found the biggest thing to help my was my mindset. As soon as I changed my thoughts from ‘Poor me, look at all that delicious food I’m missing out on’ to ‘I am better off by not putting poison into my body, I feel sorry for those people eating that food and not knowing what it is doing to them’, I didn’t want it anymore. About 2-3 weeks in and I could comfortably watch other people eat sugar without wanting it at all. I lasted a good 10 months without hardly a slip. Then I started slipping slowly and I then consciously snapped back out of it and back on the wagon. You can do it and you will feel better. If i can do it, anyone can.

    [Reply]

  • Melissa

    Hi Sarah,
    I bought IQS ebook last night but I can’t open it on my phone-it says “unable to download”.

    Can you pls help?

    Thanks!

    Melissa

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Hey Melissa, have you read the “how to download files” bit here http://www.sarahwilson.com.au/i-quit-sugar-ebook/ ?
    If you still have dramas, email info@sarahwilson.com.au
    x

    [Reply]

  • kirrilee

    Yes I would prefer a hard copy of the book too. I have 5 kids and while I think we eat pretty well (gluten free at home and low-processed, except for the teenager who has discovered white bread!) I would like to go sugar-free, for myself mostly and as much as I can do with the kids. One has egg/gluten allergies but turns to sugary things to fill up. He desperately needs good fats. I would like to drop my baby weight and my moods are all over the place. It just needs to be a gentle transition, with recipes that aren’t too time consuming. BTW I love this blog.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I hear you! I THINK my book will appeal to you. It does have a bunch of eggy recipes, but there are quite a few vegan options too

    [Reply]

    denise Reply:

    I’m trying to get my head around it, occassionally I’ve had cups of tea with no sugar, but my taste buds don’t like it. If I gave up sugar, I’d lose 5 kgs straight. I think I will buy the book this week.

    [Reply]

  • kirrilee

    I forgot something – I’ve begun eating more coconut oil, instead of butter, but sometimes it makes me feel really sick in the stomach – not always, but sometimes, usually until I eat the next meal. I don’t eat it on its own. Any thoughts?

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    I am the same Kirrilee with coconut butter but not sure why. oh though I’ve just remembered that when I started to use apple cider vinegar it helped me digest/prcocess my good fats better. I’m keen to try and quite sugar again. I did it the wrong way before having the wrong type of dairy for me and too many nuts which I’m not good with.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    hey guys, is it possible coconut oil is simply filling you up? I eat it after lunch and honestly can’t eat another thing until dinner. I had an uncomfortable feeling around this…then realised it was a slightly guilty feeling around feeling full!

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    I haven’t tried it straight after a meal. That would probably help. Thanks Sarah.

    [Reply]

    Carrie Reply:

    I think it’s getting rid of some of the bad gut flora (antibacterial & anti microbial) and can make you feel bad. It happened to me and I cut back the amount and slowly increased.

    [Reply]

  • Alice

    I just wrote a mammoth comment then realised I could simplify it.

    RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS/OTHER WONKY AUTOIMMUNE THINGS/GENERAL BLAH-NESS RE: ENERGY, SLEEP, BEING AWAKE (haha) + CUTTING OUT SUGAR (or minus the sugar!) = THREE VERY VERY HAPPY PEOPLE: RHEUMATOLOGIST, HOLISTIC DOCTOR AND PATIENT (meeee!)

    My theory is that sugar breeds yuck, so cut out the sugar and give your body some damn peace.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    NICE EQUATION!!!

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Alice I hope this is me. I too have rheumatoid arthritis plus lupus plus 13 month old twins :) I’m really hoping quitting sugar sorts out my autoimmune issues. I’m 9 weeks in and so far so good. I’m looking forward to making my rheumatologist and doctor happy. I’ve already made myself happy.

    [Reply]

    Alice Reply:

    All the best Kate, I hope cutting out sugar and replacing it with other delicious awesomeness works for you. I find that once I eat sugar (and I can’t really stop…. or I find it really hard to) I can get really achey and swell up and be super puffy for a couple of days… I don’t know I just find sugar triggers my joints… I also noticed a massive difference when I cut out dairy, like the change was huge! Some people say to cut out meat but a girl has to enjoy herself :) all the best xxx

    [Reply]

    Kate Reply:

    Thanks Alice. I haven’t had cows milk for years now. I drink goats milk and just started the occasional almond milk as well. When I was pregnant I went into a full remission and felt the best I have ever felt in the 9 years since I was diagnosed. I want to and need to get back to that. Good luck with your journey :)

  • Jancie

    Bit off track here but looking at your instagram photos, you obviously drive a jeep. Read your recent blog about buying your first apartment in Sydney so I really hope you will buy a more eco friendly car. No one needs a 4wd in the city.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I drive a Jeep….rarely. Mostly I ride and walk in the city. But I get out bush a lot. Ergo the car.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.shopnaturally.com.au Jo @ Shop Naturally

    Tackle one beast at a time, but I also recommend people quit eating wheat. Even if you’re not having digestive issues, it’s so overly processed and not good for you. For your body to digest the wheat, it’s taking much needed nutrients away from other bodily functions.

    You don’t have to go gluten free, try swapping out Spelt, an ancient wheat grain, or Kamut or even Quinoa. You can get pasta & bread and flour. It’s made a HUGE difference to my body’s ability to digest the healthy stuff. It really is worth a go. Check out The Healthy Chef (Teresa Cutter) for some great recipes and also a blog I run with a friend, Two Modern Cavewomen for some ideas.

    [Reply]

    Anne Reply:

    I have also cut out wheat but have gone one step further & cut out all grains. Have substituted coconut flour & almond flour whenever I cook & have made the most fabulous almond flour pizza base so I can now enjoy a sugar free, wheat free home made pizza. Takes time to get used to it but once you feel in benefits you will never go back to eating the “old” way.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.wellnesswa.com.au Annette @ Wellness WA

    Am slowly cutting out sugar from my diet (doing really well at the processed stuff, still eating a bit of fruit – but only in conjunction with good fats & proteins so the blood sugar spike isn’t dramatic) and am doing well, feeling good.

    Thanks Sarah! :) XO

    [Reply]

    Lauren Reply:

    How do you find this as a veggie Annette?? What do you like to use as your no sugar protein base?

    [Reply]

  • Tiff

    Looking forward to trying again in the new year. I always go well until I get my cycle and then turn into a crazed beast looking for sugar. Any tips for this? Nothing seems to have worked so far?!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    eating more fat and protein is the only way. Have you tried coconut oil yet? Check out my blog post on how it helps…and makes you lose weight!

    [Reply]

    Tiff Reply:

    Might have to try some coconut oil recipes as I’m not much on the taste of it when I tried a spoonful after meals. Also finding fat/protein rich foods when I don’t eat meat or dairy can get very repetitive and reliant on nuts. Enjoying planning on making some of your recipes though. Cheers

    [Reply]

    Jo @ Shop Naturally Reply:

    Try putting coconut oil in to some green tea and drinking it. You get a little lip balm at the same time as you drink ! Pick one with a really lovely clean taste, like the Loving Earth or the Coconut Magic if you’re having troubles with the taste of other brands. I have both in my own pantry and in my store.

    I have very recently started cooking with coconut oil and some brands leave quite the taste behind in the food. These two brands were my fave and the cleanest taste.

  • Sim

    I was all set to quit sugar in November when my nutritionist recommended trying to quit gluten first. I’ve been gluten free for two months now and not looking back! Has made a world of difference!

    However, I’ve noticed my sugar consumption rising and I am not happy about this at all. Is quitting sugar when you’re only recently gluten free a bit much to ask of my body? Or do they complement each other?

    Also, what are the main detox effects? I’ve been getting light headed around that time of the month (ever since I started on an anti-depressant) and if sugar detox gives me similar symptoms I might just wait until after it!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    You’re asking the right person. I quit both at roughly same time. To be honest, having gluten out will making IQS easier…so many glutenous temptations are full of sugar. Also, cutting out cheap carbs is a big part of quitting sugar. Plus, if you’re quitting sugar for gut=related issues (I presume so), then you NEED to get sugar out to ensure your gut lining heals. Hope that makes sense?
    Symptoms? I had very few…I felt better, including in the head, within two weeks. I personally think having sugar out – stabilising your energy – will help with the depression-related stuff. It might even BE the cause? Plus, eating more fat will all. Try it. It’s not that hard. Promise. And if it doesn’t work…back off.

    [Reply]

    Sim Reply:

    Gluten free due to bloating and lethargy issues. Didn’t realise the brain-fog would clear along with it!

    I went GF because it instinctively felt like the right thing to do. It’s feeling like that with sugar now, too. Going to bite the bullet and see how my body responds! Thanks for the feedback!

    [Reply]

    Jo @ Shop Naturally Reply:

    I have done both at the same time too. Going GF (or for me, wheat free, I stll eat oats) and sugar free at the same time really does cut out a lot of ‘garbage’ food. I thought I’d really miss bread, and now I’m off it, I’d be lucky to eat bread once or twice a month. I’ll have some gluten free with poached eggs at my fave cafe or I’ll have some spelt or kamut from Country Life at home, and while they’re not gluten free, I allow myself ancient grains once in a while, but they’re certainly not a part of my staple diet.

    I follow the 80/20 rule, eat 80% for nutrition and 20% for tastebuds. A lot of the time, the 80% is higher. Once in a while, it’s low, but you have to treat yourself!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    PS most of the recipes are gluten free

    [Reply]

  • Jayne

    Hey there, just wondering about the suitability of quitting sugar completely for people who do a lot of daily endurance exercise (eg triathletes, runners etc) – I tend to rely a lot on bananas, gels (which are maltodextrin) and sports drinks for mid training refueling. In this situation is perhaps the best option to cut down rather than quitting (so that sugar would still be consumed during training), or perhaps waiting until the off season to quit and then reintroduce the fruit / gels etc by week 8 so as not to impact training? Would welcome any other thoughts on this.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Hey Jayne, I get asked this a lot and have looked into it – the sugar you need for intense exercise is glucose, not fructose. It’s fructose that we cut out in the IQS plan and we use glucose (straight up) as a subsitute sweetener. So, yes, IQS, is suitable – and in fact GREAT – for you. If you want an energy drink idea – choose PLAIN Lucozade…it’s straight glucose. Also, try chia seeds…my Dad runs marathons and I’ve got him onto all this and he swears by the chia. Have you read Born to Run? It explains the benefits.

    [Reply]

    Jayne Reply:

    Awesome, thanks Sarah! I wasnt sure if I needed to cut out all sugar in the first 7 weeks but that explains it. Yep all over Chia, Born to Run is great! Thanks again, love the blog :)

    [Reply]

    Kristy Reply:

    Hi Jayne,
    There are a few products like Shotz gels that only contain glucose (no fructose) that might be worth trying?

  • Peter

    Hi,
    Just wondering if as a type 1 diabetic this would be of benefit for me. I already don’t eat a lot of sugar but I do have cravings. I think I know the answer but would like some other advice

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Peter, I suggest you stick to whatever your Doctor tells you to do – I’m not a doctor and type 1 diabetes is a specific illness. However, I think you’d beneft from the cookbook…it supplies good alternatives for desserts and treats etc…

    [Reply]

  • Erika

    I have a massive problem with sugar along with having a love for baking. I have tried to quit sugar for years now and I am successful for about a week, probably less and then after a few days, I get this wicked urge to eat something with sugar. I am in the health fitness industry and want to be able to walk my talk. Do you have any tips to stop those urges? I am slowly finding some raw chocolate recipes to keep that sweet taste in my day but is there an easier way of doing it without food?

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    have you done the program? It walks you through how to do this…hard to sum up in a comment…but, yes, the program is ALL about getting rid of those cravings.

    [Reply]

  • Kristy

    Hi Sarah,

    I have fructose malabsorption and was wondering if you had any advice for quitting sugar as quite a few of the suggested substitutes are based around coconut and other foods that aren’t suitable for FM.
    Also, do you know of any suitable breads? All the GF ones seem to contain sugar.

    I’m hoping to have a sugar free start to 2013 :)

    Thanks and happy new year
    Kristy x

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    FM is a tricky one…some nutritionists say coconut is fine, others no. So it’s really hard for me to advise. I would suggest showing my book to your doc/specialist and asking them…if it’s not suitable to your protocol, you can get a refund.

    [Reply]

    Kristy Reply:

    Thanks :) I’ve been seeing a dietician and coconut is a no-go for me unfortunately.
    Are there any GF breads you can recommend?

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    GF breads are hard…most are FULL of sugar. I avoid.

    Lucinda Reply:

    I’ve been eating the Country Life GF breads, they are about 5% sugar which too me seemed fair enough if its the only bread I eat, two slices and an egg in the morning is very filling.

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    The other issue with GF bread is they are super full of yeast also, to make up for the lack of gluten, which can increase bloating and digestive issues.

    Lola Reply:

    Country life have a gluten, dairy and yeast free bread that tastes nice.

    seeker Reply:

    kirsty,
    you could take a look at lee’s supercharged foods blog for gf yeast free sugar free breads … they’re excellent!

    [Reply]

  • TANJA

    Hi Sarah

    Thanks for a very inspirational blog and taking time out for us on the last day of 2012.
    I am currently pregnant (due in May) and fructose intolerant, thus I have a question in relation to the use of Stevia while pregnant (as it is used a lot in your recipies), with there being a some conflicting information to its use/safety while pregnant. What, if any information have you come across, and what would be some suitable alternatives.
    Looking forward to your hard-cover book and I’ll be purchasing as soon as it hits the shelf.

    Thank you.
    P>S> HAPPY NEW YEARS!!!!

    [Reply]

  • Lauren

    Hi Sarah,
    I have quit sugar however I lean towards a vegan diet as a result of my yoga practice and commitment to my belief that I don’t want something to die for my hunger. However, I suffer from terrible abdominal bloating and illness that leaves me bed ridden for days. I currently eat beans, soy and quinoa/brown rice and nothing “nasty”, no cheats, no chemicals 100% local and organic vegetables nuts seeds coconut oil superfoods and seaweeds and fish. Do you think that cutting out the soy and beans could make a difference? I also drink 2-3L of water No dairy or gluten.
    Thank you very much! You are so inspiring! X

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Hey Lauren, can I HIGHLY recommend reading The Vegetarian Myth, by Lierre Kieth…a vegan of 20 years…it will explain all and will explain that FAR more sentient life is lost when you have a grain/soy-based diet. Soy and beans are highly toxic…and cause a lot of bloating. But if you’re not eating eggs etc then you’re not getting enough fat and protein.

    [Reply]

    Lauren Reply:

    Thank you Sarah for your reply; I eat lots of nuts, seeds, coconut oil and avocado as well as sunwarrior protein, green sea veggies and m fish for protein however I am thinking about eliminating the “toxic” beans and soy for organic chicken breast and eggs to see if this makes a difference to how sick and bloated I am. I will definitely look up that book as well! Thank you so much for your time!! X

    [Reply]

    Rosie Reply:

    Hi Lauren if your thinking of eliminating soy I would give it a try. I was having soy for years but have only recently realised that it’s the culprit for a few of my woes. I definately noticed the difference. Beans well my gut isn’t great with alot of those anyway so I mainly avoid. Good luck!

    Lauren Reply:

    Thank you very much!! I have been thinking about it for a while now and I think that I need to acknowledge what does and does not work for my body and live accordingly rather than by what is “right” in not eating animals.. Thank you do much for your support and I will definitely be giving this a try!! I’ll let you know how it goes :) xx

    [Reply]

  • Lucinda

    Hi Sarah,
    I’ve recently had to go GF as a result of my hashimotos and sugars have unfortunately crept their way back into my life, whilst adapting I suppose. I was using stevia as a substitute but have found it difficult to create GF stevia treats. With three kids to feed and me a sweet tooth this has set me back. I was doing really well until the silly season and the GFness descended!! Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Lucinda, gluten is non-negotiable with hashimotos…it’s not a choice, you really must not eat it. Have you tried the recipes in my cookbook? Most are GF and sweetened with stevia…

    [Reply]

  • http://sorryfortheselfies.blogspot.com Pippa

    Hi Sarah,
    I really enjoy reading your blog and have purchased your IQS ebook and cookbook. I have previously quit sugar and felt much better for it. When I quit sugar before, I was living in the city in an apartment so I could make the recipes and source healthy food all the time. However, at the moment I am travelling around Australia and am finding it difficult to stay off sugar as it is so readily available. I only have an esky and a gas stove and don’t always have access to healthy, fresh food so I am struggling with ideas to make up some healthy snacks besides nuts and seeds (which I have for breakfast). I did make a variation of your chocolate nut balls and they set in the esky which was pretty awesome but if you have any tips, I would love to hear them!
    Thank you and all the best for 2013!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.sapta.webs.com handoko

    Sarah,
    You should have your post published on a famous magazine. A sugar free life is good startup for a long healthy life. I know how sugar effect to our body and blood, and thats the reason of coca-cola produce a zero sugar coke :). Nice article.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.eightydays.com.au Keryn

    Hi Sarah,
    I’m going into week 4 IQS and happy with myself and how I handled the Christmas period. However, I’ve not lost any weight and still feel at times bloated. I’d really like to lose 5-8 kg after putting on 8kg in 2012 (59kg to 67kg) but nothing is happening. If anything a slight increase in weight. Is this a common problem and what can I do about it?
    Thanks so much. You’ve inspired me to a better life!
    Keryn

    [Reply]

    Lea Reply:

    Hi Keryn,

    Following a consistent exercise routine and a balanced, varied diet are the two best things you can do to improve and maintain your health. If you’re trying to lose weight these two habits in combination are far more effective than only one.

    It sounds like you already have the motivation and inspiration so i’m sure you will see results :)

    [Reply]

    Keryn Reply:

    Thanks Lea, that is great advice and yes I am starting to excercise more and have a plan for this year.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Keryn, it’s quite common. I lost the weight at the 8 week mark.

    [Reply]

    Keryn Reply:

    Thanks Sarah, that’s the motivation I need to continue! Looking forward to seeing your book in hard copy!

    [Reply]

  • Katherine in London

    Is this the same as the regular IQS ebook?

    Love your work Sarah. Happy New Year.

    XO

    [Reply]

  • Mel

    Sarah, I have read your blog for several years now. I started reading it when I was going through a breakdown in my marriage with a man I loved with a new baby while I juggled work. Your life is very different to mine in so many ways but I connected with you as a strong, independent woman of my age who takes risks, works hard towards dreams, is real but has compassion and is hopeful not bitter. Your posts have taken me on little trips of learning. I was always on your track but you introduced me to inspiring people I may never have known about: joost is a recent one that has blown me away. Micheal pollan is another. I enjoy seeing that rare “hippiness”!! that is lost in successful 30yr old women who tend to go all suburban consumerist. So THANKYOU for being a joy in some very dark days. Because you are not perfect, you are changing and discovering who you are and your blog shows that clearly over the three years. You helped me make huge life changes safe in the knowledge that things sometimes don’t turn out but that’s a piece of your history and a life fully lived. This is a thankyou a long time coming and certainly not an ego stroking follower.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Thank you Mel!!!

    [Reply]

  • Lea

    Hi,

    I’m not so much a sugar addict, quite the opposite really, but i do like the idea of cutting out refined sugar from my diet and eliminating foods which have ‘hidden sugars’. I love yoghurt and i know it has sugar in it. Can anyone recommend a good yoghurt that is low in sugar but also sweet tasting? I’m not a fan of some natural yoghurts due to the flavour.

    Ta, leah x

    [Reply]

    Alice Reply:

    I think you’re asking to have your cake and eat it here! All sweet-tasting yoghurts contain high levels of fructose, there is just no getting around it. Part of going sugar-free is retraining your tastebuds. If you really do decide to quit, you’ll notice after a while that you will find a lot of things sickly sweet – sweetened yoghurts will be one of them.

    There are two mild yoghurts I swear by, both without additional milk powders and both made with non-homogenised milk – Paris Creek and Marrook Farm. I now mostly make my own yoghurt from bath milk, and it is lush, but these two make great starters as well.

    Be aware that sweetened yoghurt is basically a form of dairy pudding – it has pretty much lost all of its probiotic value and the added sugar negates anything else of value.

    [Reply]

    Lea Reply:

    Thanks for the advice Alice. If i’m to steer clear of yoghurt, than what would be a good substitute for say breakfast with granola? I havent downloaded the eating plan yet so i’m not sure on the foods which can be consumed or avoided.

    Ta

    [Reply]

    Steph Reply:

    Alice is right in saying that your taste buds change and things really do taste much sweeter once off sugar. I have found a plain yoghurt with some cinnamon and a little powdered stevia mixed in is a nice treat.

    [Reply]

  • Asha

    Sorry if someone has already posted this… I am very interested in cutting out sugar, but I worry about money and time… I am a new Momma and have a hard time finding time to grab and eat let alone prepare food. My husband works two jobs just to make it possible for me to be at home and we can just barely make ends meet… is this possible for me?

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Hi Asha, to live clean you do have to cook. But cooking doesn’t have to be fancy. It’s just about assembling ingredients that you KNOW don’t contain toxins. My cookbook is designed to set you up with lots of stuff in the fridge and freezer that you can pull out any time. Oats for breakfast cost a lot less than sugary breakfast cereal, as one example.

    [Reply]

    Asha Reply:

    Thanks for your reply, Sarah! I really think I need to do this for me and my son… I want to be able to provide a good example for him. He’ll be starting solids in a few months and I plan to do baby led weaning, so I don’t want to be eating any food that I wouldn’t be okay with giving to him.

    [Reply]

    seeker Reply:

    that’s so beautiful asha … fair dues to you for thinking this way, and to your husband for working 2 jobs … sounds to me like your son already has two fantastic role models.
    coles & woolies sell good value organic carrots and veg … small cuts of grass fed meat and woolies sell good organic f.r. chicken legs at great prices which can be marinated and roasted and or used to make stock … keep your thirst for wellbeing and you will find what you need … its all out there!! xo

  • Margie

    I have been sugar free for about 3 years. It really makes a world of difference to your health. It was at my naturopaths urging I did it earlier whilst trying to get pregnant. Also cut wheat. Had my lovely baby then lapsed for a little while. I was just delirious and used sugar to pep me up.
    Been clean again for 3 years. I also used to get a lots of endometriosis pain and have period troubles. All this has gone with both sugar and wheat cut out.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Great feedback Margie

    [Reply]

  • Paula

    Hi Sarah, I have PCOS and since going paleo (though I still eat dairy so it’s more primal) around March this year and sugar free with your xmas program, my PCOS is becoming easier to manage. The physical symptoms are slowly easing and I am able to deal with stress a lot easier. My skin is so much more clearer and for the first time in a very long time & I can manage my (formerly out of control) appetite. Having gone from needing to eat every couple of hours to being happy with mostly 3 meals a day, is brilliant!

    So many are solely focussed on weight, when we should be looking at our whole health.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    AGree! Thanks Paula.

    [Reply]

  • Lauren

    Hi Sarah, I think I can successfully say I’ve quit sugar in the last eight weeks — I’m no longer a crazed person searching for something sweet after lunch and dinner, and, of course, I feel so much better. I am also coeliac, and I am eating really well (more consistently) and feel good about my food choices. I am surprised though that I haven’t lost any weight, not that it was the reason for quitting, but just for the fact that I’m eating so much better. I’m guessing it’s probably due to the fact that I eat more dairy, nuts, coconut and cheese (haloumi!). I wonder if this is pretty normal? I guess now I have the basis of not eating sugar and I can start to see how much fat I’m consuming.

    But thank you for getting me on the IQS train! x

    [Reply]

  • Natasha

    Hi Sarah,

    I’m dairy free while breast feeding and my 3 children are also dairy and soy free (with exception of the odd soy baby-cinos) due to an intolerance. I’m setting them a bad example with my sugar consumption and it’s time to remedy that. My husband is on board, but for the kids and I, I’m worried about choice having to do it sans all that yummy cheese and delicious yoghurt.

    None of us has a weight problem and I’m worried – and doesn’t it sound ridiculous – that eliminating my baking will see me get too thin!! I miss dairy, I know that’ll help me once my 3rd weans, but what for the kids while they’re still intolerant? Or do I simply proceed and not worry? The kids drink Rice Milk due to its being fortified with calcium….I’d prefer Almond milk, but I’m yet to find one with the same amount of calcium.

    Thoughts!?

    Many thanks and Sarah, my Biodynamic Osteo directed me to your book and I’m very grateful to her and to you.

    Natasha

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Hi Natasha, have you tried unpasteurized milk for the intolerances? I’m not allowed to suggest it as such….but def look into it.
    Also, making your own probiotic yoghurt I reckon could help?
    Regarding the IQS program – most of my recipes allow for non-dairy substitutes. And it is VERY pro-fat. You won’t lose weight unless you need to. It’s about your body finding its natural place.

    [Reply]

  • Cherie

    Well exactly 12 months ago to the day I took the plunge and decided to quit sugar. I wasn’t overweight nor did I have any dietary issues, I just new sugar had me.
    I won’t say the first 3 weeks weren’t challenging – they most certainly were trying – but I now feel better than ever. No more energy slumps at 2pm, no more mood swings, the anxiety has gone, my skin is healthier, my tummy is no longer bloated and I am so proud of myself.
    The 8 week program, along with some additional reading, was easy peasy to follow and to anyone even considering it I say ‘get cracking.’
    This is the ideal time to do it, in my opinion, as it’s a chance to welcome new habits, kick old ones and for new beginnings.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    THanks Cherie!

    [Reply]

  • http://hailtothenihilist.wordpress.com Hail To The Nihilist

    “I hate diets. Quitting sugar is not a diet. It’s not miserable, you eat more, you eat without guilt. And it’s not a fad; I don’t do fads either.”

    Is that so? If so, why? Because you say it isn’t? This quit sugar caper sounds just like any other diet or fad. Not that that’s a bad thing, as that would assume that all diets and fads are bad.

    [Reply]

    Steph Reply:

    Its not a fad or a diet because its sustainable and its healthy as a long term eating choice. Fads and diets are ‘quick fixes’ and usually leave you worse off once you stop them. Quitting sugar is a health and lifestyle change. You don’t have to believe Sarah or the hundreds of commenters here whose lives have been changed because of it. You can try it for yourself and see how you feel. That’s what the plan is all about, experimenting slowly and kindly rather then sticky to some unhealthy, unrealistic ‘fad’.

    [Reply]

    Steph Reply:

    Its not a fad or a diet because its sustainable and its healthy as a long term eating choice. Fads and diets are ‘quick fixes’ and usually leave you worse off once you stop them. Quitting sugar is a health and lifestyle change. You don’t have to believe Sarah or the hundreds of commenters here whose lives have been changed because of it. You can try it for yourself and see how you feel. That’s what the plan is all about, experimenting slowly and kindly rather then sticking to some unhealthy, unrealistic ‘fad’.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.thelifeshemade.com Kristy@thelifeshemade

    I bought the cookbook a long time ago via download from your site. I cannot for the life of me find it now on my computer. What is the file name? Might help with the search.

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: Sweet breakfast omelette or “French sans toast” « Healthy Serves One

  • Fotina

    Hi Sarah,

    I quit sugar due to having an auto immune disease. I felt great after the 8 weeks on no sugar, I lost 4 kilos which i never planned to but it was a nice surprise. Anyways Christmas and New Years came along and I fell the victim to sugar again and I cant believe how crap I feel, my cravings for sugar came back, Im so lethargic, grumpy, i feel I have no energy, and all I want to do is stuff my face with more sugar (but I wont) hehe.

    New years I went to an Ikarian Greek Dance, (Im Ikarian myself) and the food was very low in sugar, lots of meat and red wine,(I was very proud). Was great. anyways I did come here to ask a question and I just wanted to know which may sound silly but is cider a bad alcoholic choice?

    All the best for the New Year

    [Reply]

    Ms Jane Reply:

    I reckon you’d be better off with something else Fotina. Apples are FULL of fructose which you’re trying to avoid (at least at the start of quitting sugar) and cider is loaded with sugar. I don’t drink anymore but you maybe better off with a clean spirit like vodka etc. Cheers!

    [Reply]

  • Rebecca bell

    I have just started the 8 week programme and am eating so much fat to keep my cravings at bay.

    I’m just worried how long this lasts because I do feel like I’m putting on weight. Is this normal to do this for a week or two while I beat the cravings?

    Thanks

    [Reply]

  • Oasisbaby

    Hi, I’m starting sugar free! Today is Day 2 and I’m experiencing sugar cravings even tho I’m not hungry- what snacks can you recommend until I get a hold of myself? I want to get down to eating 3 meals a day NO snacking. But right now I can’t get rid of this craving.

    [Reply]

    debs Reply:

    I know! I’m the same! Nothing satiates sugar like… sugar :(
    When I started I was eating lots of fat to keep on top of the cravings. Sadly I never got past this point… I’m planning a come back tho.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.notjustamummy.com Naomi

    Hi Sarah and others,

    Absolutely loved both the Ebook and the cookbook. Have read cover to cover and made my shopping lists to get cracking next week (when I return from
    The UK). I even have hubby on board. My question is more about when we should start the program? We have a wedding on the 26th Jan (Australia day) and then I head to the US for 10 days at the beginning of march. I don’t want to wait till April to start but not sure if I’m setting myself up to fail by kicking off at such a busy time of year? Any advice would be appreciated!
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Lee Reply:

    I’d suck it up and start now!! There will ALWAYS be things and events that you think will make it harder or just won’t work so you avoid starting…Truth is, it’s a lifestyle change, so unless you plan on never going to another wedding, or holiday, and will only eat and stick to the comfort of food made in your own home, well then you’re never really going to get going on this at all right? Yes, they will be challenging and maybe you will slip up, but the wedding and trip will also be major learning curves for you – you’ll really have your eyes open to how to live in this world obsessed with sugar and how you can get around it. Try telling the bride/groom for catering changes for you. It’s not unheard of for vegetarians or vegans or Kosher people, or even nut, dairy, soy etc allergy types to ask for a different meal (with advance notice of course), asking for no sugar is not exactly different! Maybe they could offer you some fruit and cream for dessert instead of cake? The trip will offer you multiple challenges daily! But go on..Go for it! Now!! You can do it!!!!!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.sharnanigans.com Sharni

    Hi Sarah,

    Congrats on success of this movement!

    Sorry if it has been asked but haven’t time to trawl through comments right now..

    I am a massive sugar addict and breastfeeding…. i know not the best for either, but will withdrawals for me and bub be worth it if done while breastfeeding?

    [Reply]

  • Michelle

    How does your I quit sugar plan ammend to people with food allergies?
    I am allergic to gluten, dairy, soy and peanuts.

    [Reply]

  • Caroline

    Hi Sarah
    I am very tempted to both quit sugar but more so be inspired with healthy alternative recipes. I love cooking so looking forward to the recipes.
    However I also love baking and wondering what do you bake with if not sugar? I notice you advertise nativia? Are artificial sweeteners ok with the I quit sugar philosophy?
    Also how many recipes are in the book? And when is your hard copy book being released?
    Thank you very much!
    Caroline

    [Reply]

  • Simone

    Hi Sarah!
    Have been trying to follow a paleo way of eating for a few months but have had periods where I am out of control and binge like a crazy person. I can feel it taking hold of me so am considering IQS. The Bain thing I am sacred of us I have just started a really stressful job which us shift work and I don’t know if starting this new job is conducive to starting and being successful on IQS?
    Would really appreciate your thoughts.
    PS. I lost 20 kilos last year and have put on 6 :(
    Would ideally like to lose another 15kgs.
    Thanks so much
    Simone

    [Reply]

    Simone Reply:

    Have just re read my post and needed to sincerely apologise for my woeful spelling!! Thank you to my 2 & 6 yr old for completely distracting me whilst writing a public post!

    [Reply]

  • http://leukandc.com Raquel

    Hi Sarah, not sure if anyone has asked this question, but I have been considering quitting sugar, and am very tempted to buy your bundle, however I noticed you replace sugar with coconut a lot and I just can’t stomach it, (it must sound a bit strange but it just doesn’t agree with me).
    What can you suggest other than coconut?
    Thanks
    Raquel

    [Reply]

  • Lee

    I bought the 8 week plan and I know you don’t like to calorie count or fat count or whatever…but I really think I need some guidelines on what and how much to eat! I just don’t think, like you, that I can “feel” what is right…. I”m just not that in touch with my body! I’m fairly sure cutting out the sugar and replacing it with more fats will be fine (only on day 1 now) but I have a bit of a self destructive/obsessive personality which I can see resulting in me going absolutely overboard on non-sugar fatty foods …And not because I’m craving sugar, or even that I am hungry at all…Just because I’ve been told “it’s ok to eat these types of foods”… There needs to be a balance right?
    How do I know what is excessive or where to draw the line? I literally need to write it down and stick to the fridge/pantry. If I stop eating sugar, that is converting to fat, and replace it with a hell of a lot more actual fat, surely I can’t achieve weight loss??

    [Reply]

  • Olga

    Hi Sarah,

    Thanks for your time in advance!

    I’m a vegetarian bordering vegan. Besides recommending me to eat meat, is there any other tips you could offer?

    It’s all starting to worry me as all food is turning out to be bad for you – it’s making preparing meals difficult!

    Thanks in advance.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.jacintafleur.com jacinta

    I’m in I’m in. Starting tomorrow. So excited!!!!!!!!

    [Reply]

  • Jac

    I’m 7 1/2 weeks pregnant atm – is there any reason not to quit sugar now?

    I had two early miscarriages in 2012 so I’m not at all keen to do anything that would endanger this bub (who we saw for the first time on Wednesday, heartbeat ticking away beautifully <3 ).

    [Reply]

  • http://sweetcheekssugarfree.wordpress.com/ Bec

    Hi Sarah,

    I’m on day 7 of sugar free, and going strong! I’m hoping you can suggest some sugar free drinks for me to try? I know in your ebook you suggest lots of tea and water (which is really all I’ve been having) but I’m getting a littl bored of the taste!

    Thanks :)
    Bec

    [Reply]

  • Jesse

    Hi Sarah,

    I’m really keen to try the program, but I’m a stay at home mum on a very tight budget and I’m concerned I won’t be able to afford the foods on the program. Are you able to give us a preview of the shopping list in the ebook? Thanks :)

    [Reply]

  • Sandi

    Sarah:

    I’m beginning a one month elimination diet for allergies; how does your program work with eliminating the following: Wheat, soy, corn, potatoes, brewer’s yeast?

    Thank you.
    sandi

    [Reply]

  • Fiona

    Hi Sarah,

    I bought your ebook and cookbook and I’m in love!
    Within three days of cutting out sugar my bloating stopped.

    I have one question though, you have a never of recipes w berries in your cookbook. Do you recommend not have those from week 3?

    Cheers

    Fiona

    [Reply]

  • Sabina

    Hi Sarah
    What is the difference between purchasing the 8 week program and buying the new book? What is the added value of purchasing the discounted ebooks along with the new book? Also when you talk about quitting sugar are you also talking about quitting sweeteners such as panela and rapadura and stevia, coconut sugar, banana sugar etc? Many thanks.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.jacintafleur.com jacinta

    Day 8 of my IQS. A small disaster occured today. I lost 5 years worth of email subscribers for an art prize that I run. An auto renew button was inadvertently turned off in my email marketing account and my subscription lost. Whilst on the phone to the company, I was waiting for the white hot “phone call centre rage” that I usually experience to bubble up inside of me. But it didn’t. I felt okay. I felt freaked out yes, and I had a nice chat to the man on the other end of the line about feeling very concerned about the lost data. But the angryness wasn’t there. I was talking to a friend last night about how I felt kinder, calmer and gentler since quitting sugar. The small disaster today has really confirmed that I am getting calmer. Thank you Sarah for opening the quit sugar door for me!

    [Reply]

  • Susan

    Hi, I am trying to quit sugar so receiving information about your blog and book on stone soup was very timely. Quick question – does your program include artifical sweetner? The reason I ask is I don’t like anything even close to artifical sweetner and I am also trying to go natural.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.biome.com.au Shionagh

    Hi Sarah,
    When you say you can still include alcohol in your diet what exactly do you mean? How much and what types?
    http://www.biome.com.au/148-australian-gifts

    [Reply]

  • http://www.sleepydwarf.blogspot.com.au/ sleepydwarf

    Hi Sarah
    I’ve just read Sweet Poison & have heard good things about your 8 week IQS program. I’m very keen to start and also to cut out gluten as much as possible. But my family is not so keen, which makes things very hard, as I’m not the only one who cooks the meals.

    I’m wondering what tips you have to gently encourage a diabetic family member who is on meds for diabetes and high cholesterol to consider that their sugar intake – that they don’t think is very high, but all you have to do is look at what they have for breakfast to know that it is – when they are highly resistant to the idea of changing their diet and seem to be happy to be on medications rather than finding ways to control their conditions without drugs.

    Whenever I try to approach the subject I get met with the eye-roll and “don’t get preachy” look. I try not to be preachy about it, but obviously am failing somewhere.

    [Reply]

  • Tabetha

    Sarah, you may have answered this before but I haven’t found it anywhere, so sorry in advance if you have. I know you said freshly squeezed fruit juice concentrates the sugar and that you would avoid it, if I am understanding correctly. My question is, do you juice and use fruit? I juice a lot and I use both fruit and vegetables, and I am curious as to what your thoughts are on juicing fruit. Thank you for your time!

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    Hi.
    After being diagnosed with fructose malabsorption and having years of gut issues I completed 3 months of “I quit sugar”. Unfortunately I continued to feel flat and have gut issues even though I was eating no fruit or sugar! When I re-commenced sugar it came with increases lethargy, excessive thirst, weight loss & binge eating. A saw a gut specialist to look into gluten intolerance and after a bit of digging was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The “iqs” period rested my struggling pancreas a little but when I started eating sugar again my diabetic symptoms were much more obvious as my pancreas struggled to release insulin to counteract all the sugar. It’s been 4 days since my diagnosis so the challenge will be learning to balance my blood sugars with diet, exercise and yes injecting insulin. Diabetes type 1 is an autoimmune disease. Its nothing ive done wrong (that im aware of) I am a 27 year old physiotherapist who eats well and runs half marathons, I am a healthy person with an Ai disease. I am relieved to finally know why i fellisp awful. If you have any symtptoms of diabetes after or during the isq chat to your GP.

    [Reply]

  • Tammie

    Hi All
    Have just purchased the ebook bundle, but it will not download. Oppps it was on my I pad. Any tips or suggestions! Thanks Tammie

    [Reply]

  • JB

    Hi,
    I bought the IQS e-book and saw that i’m supposed to get a link to the kindle download. I haven’t got it yet. can you help?

    thanks!

    [Reply]

  • Amanda

    Hi Sarah,

    My family and I absolutely love you book. We are currently in week 4 of our sugar free fast, and feeling better every day. My mum’s leg cramps have completely gone along with a host of other small aggravating health complaints. We were just wondering what you thought of Loving Earth’s raw ‘Luvju’ chocolates that use coconut nectar as a sweetener? Also I am a little confused about how to work out if something has a high amount of sugar per serving (i.e. how many grams of sugars per serving is acceptable)…do you consider rice wine high in natural sugars and therefore best to be avoided when quitting sugar.

    I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you in advance!

    [Reply]

  • denise

    Hi Sarah,
    I have tried many ways to lose weight, it comes down to the same thing every time. My partner, who loves sugar, salt, coke, and smokes.

    I know if I gave up sugar, (cans of drink), sugar in tea and coffee, iced coffee, etc, etc.
    I don’t get any back up, and doing things on my own, i give up, then the weight goes back on double.
    Please advise me,
    denise

    [Reply]

  • http://www.biome.com.au Tracey ~ Biome

    Hi Sarah. Sorry to add another question as you are going to be busy replying to all the other questions!! It’s a pretty amazing resource just reading through everyone’s experiences in the comments. My question is whether your program is suitable for children (aged 9 and 11)? Is it something that the whole family could do together? Thank you. Tracey

    [Reply]

  • Deb

    Just went grocery shopping to start IQS programme tomorrow, was in Woolworths for 2-3 hours trying to work out what to buy. I’m so use to buying lite products. Anyway confused with milk, on page 79 in your book you write – Have a glass of milk with cinammon, what milk do you recommend?? I was trying to find a full cream milk with no sugar. I bought Almond milk is that anygood??

    [Reply]

    Deb Reply:

    Sorry to waste your time, I worked out the milk situation…

    [Reply]

  • Roxy

    Hi Sarah, Im 15 weeks pregnant and would like to start quitting sugar. Ive been told its a bad idea to start detoxs whilst your pregnant is the 8 week program out of the question or is it a good place for me to start? Or should I just start with the cook book?
    Thanks

    [Reply]

  • Tessa

    hi everyone!

    I fell into ‘I quit sugar’ quite coincidental, as my partner and I both decided we wanted to be healthier, and I saw the book 7 weeks ago in Big W. Bought it, started the first ‘easy’ week and here we are, in week 7. Both of us felt great the first 2 weeks, not tired anymore, no afternoon slumps etc. Great! And so far, still the same, my partner occassionally feels a bit tired, but he does work shifts, and I do 10 hr days, so were used to it. We do crave a bit of fruit from time to time, but that’s really about it!

    We both don’t have gluten intolerance or any auto-immune diseases, so we quit sugar, but not bread (eat wholemeal chia seed bread from Bakers Delight, low in sugar) and carbs. Is this wrong? I know carbs are converted to ‘sugars’ as well and so how bad is it to still occassionally eat pasta, rice and as I mentioned bread?
    Also, my partner does not drink coffee or tea, so pretty much all he is left with is water. And he’s had a Coke zero once a week (still bad right? but it’s all he has) I still drink a latte every day, no sugar. Are these things ok or are we ‘cheating’?
    As I said, we didn’t experience bad cravings etc, and actually are feeling good, so it feels like we must be doing something ‘wrong’, is that strange?
    I hope some quitting sugar guru’s can help us,
    Thanks a lot!

    [Reply]

  • Shara

    I’ve been doing IQS now for only 2 weeks but can say I’m converted I feel fantastic.

    I have a couple of questions, is it ok to eat bread or should you stay away if possible, if so what types are best?

    Also i do eat out a lot for business and with my husband. With Italian is pesto pasta or white wine sauces ok? And i know in your book you say Indian is ok but other than the mango chutneys and the like is there anything to stay away from?
    Thank you Sarah

    [Reply]

  • Michelle Coghill

    Hello Sarah,

    I am a little confused about the detox on what can be eaten and what can’t. I know it is no fruit, but some of the recipes call for apples, are they allowed? Also when on the detox, are all the recipes (except for Desserts Chapter) in the IQS cookbook ok to eat for those 8 weeks? and are the sweeteners (stevia/rice malt syrup) allowed during those first 6 weeks? I have already started to make changes and I loving the recipes and some of them of already became staples in my cooking. I can see this becoming a way of life and a healthier on at that.

    Great Appreciated,
    Michelle

    [Reply]

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  • Amanda

    Hi Sarah, I have started your book and am trying week one, but also find myself very confused of what to eat? I’m not sure what breads to eat???? Also I’m drinking now full cream milk in my coffee, and have bought holoumi cheese, but I’m nervous I’m all of a sudden going to put on weight. I would love a list of supermarket foods to buy, as I have a family to cook & buy for and also spent hrs in the supermarket the other day trying to workout the right foods… Maybe I’m just a little dumb, but I find myself a bit confused!! :-)

    Thanks

    [Reply]

  • http://www.garciniacambogia.com.au Laura Mart

    I have the sweetest tooth, if sugar was not so fattening i would sleep in it! haha

    [Reply]