I love food, hate waste: silo by joost

Posted on December 20th, 2012

I’ve been doing a bit of a series of posts on eliminating as much food waste as possible. You can catch up here and here. Today I’m sharing an interview I did with Joost Bakker, an anti-waste dynamo who owns the cafe Silo by Joost in Melbourne. I’d read a bit about the guy: he’s built a fire-proof straw bale house made entirely of recycled stuff in the Yarra Valley, and launched a piss-powered pop-up restaurant (yes, powered by urine). I loved the sound of him. In a gorgeous moment of serendipity I ran into him during a photo shoot my mate Marija was doing at her studios of Melbourne’s Top 100, um, Melbourne people for Melbourne Magazine. I went in to his cafe the next day to learn more about how he does his thing and shot this bodgy video. I thought you might find it inspiring…

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In the video you can learn about:

* the best way to eat oats….so that they’re actually nutritious and retain their protein and can help depression (it’s all to do with restoring the health of our guts).

* how there’s no need to buy organic oats. They’re naturally pesticide free. There you go!

* another great argument against bottled water: water is a living thing and is best taken when flowing from a tap.

Feel free to share with me any anti-food wastage initiatives you know of…I’m going to keep spreading the good word…

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  • Marie

    I love this guy!

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  • http://www.thekindcleaner.com.au/blog Paul – The Kind Little Blogger

    People like Joost are true to their values and don’t stop short. In a world full of misinformation and marketing, it’s easy to fall into the trap of dealing with so-called “ethical” operators. But these are usually types that fall short of their perceived goal. For example, how green is a product produced by Procter and Gamble? The product itself may be smothered in green-speak, but it is ultimately being produced by a company with poor commitment to the conclusion they are marketing.

    I say, do not compromise.

    Some tasks are hard to achieve, as I am sure Joost has discovered. But ought to be innovative and try their hardest. It’s just that people often give up too early.

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  • Mia Bluegirl

    Do you have a transcript? It looks interesting but I couldn’t understand what you were saying towards the end.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    No I don’t – sorry!

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    mw Reply:

    Nice Jacket !

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  • Grace

    Brilliant! Love Joost. Thank you Sarah, excellent video
    Craving Silo’s nettle soup and four grain salad now…

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  • VE

    A transcript would be fantastic

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  • Patricia

    Interesting vides, thank you for sharing Sarah.

    I am interested to know about the oats he rolls, and if he soaks them overnight to neutralise the phytic acid. I have been doing this since I read about it on your blog with apple cider vinegar in the water. I rinse them next morning, but I am not comfortable with it thinking am I taking some of the goodness out. The little machine for rolling the oats looks fabulous.

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    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Nope, he doesn’t soak

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  • Patricia

    Ooooops! above meant to read Video.

    I dont mind the soaking, but it is the rinsing that bothers me! Do you have any opinions on this Sarah?

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  • Christa

    Sarah, weren’t you destined to fall in love with a Scandinavian type?..
    Am I reading too much into this?
    Sorry

    Merry Christmas

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  • Lisa Ingram

    Steel cut oats are great if you don’t want rolled/steamed/stuffed about ones. They are different in texture etc than rolled though – me, I like it. Bircher overnight in water or what you fancy, with the odd raspberry, pepitas and a spoon of greek yog on top. Mind you, if I had a bag of oats and me own natty roller, I’d be quite content! Lisa

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  • Hannah

    This is such an interesting video and cafe – thanks Sarah. I am having problems with the link to Joost’s website though. Is it correct?
    Thanks again,
    Hannah.

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  • Kelly

    The snippets of conversation I could hear in the video sounded interesting. Especially about the oils in the oats going rancid quickly – is that just in rolled oats or would steel cut oats have the same problem?
    I’ve been doing some reading on soaking and sprouting grains (you really ignited my interest in your earlier posts on the matter, Sarah) and found this post (http://www.rebuild-from-depression.com/blog/2010/02/oatmeal_phytic_acid.html)
    It talks about higher levels of phytates in oats (and nuts, apparently) that don’t break down from prolonged soaking like other grains do. It is suggested that you add a small amount of another freshly ground grain (plus whey or apple cider vinegar – which you’ve already mentioned) to the soaking oats to help with the breakdown. I don’t own a grain mill (yet), and I know that phytic acid can hinder your body’s absorption of nutrients – do you (or any readers) know how long the effects of phytic acid can last in your system? Is it the kind of thing that you’d need to detox from?

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  • jan

    Sarah,
    Joost sounds amazing. I am wondering where you would get the unrolled oats and I couldn’t find the oat grinder on his website. I am very interested in the link with depression and the gut would love to know the mane of the doctor who is doing the research he mentioned.
    Thanks Sarah for yet another awe inspiring snippet of info

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    Danielle Reply:

    here is some reading I came across…..

    http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling.aspx

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  • Gemma-Rose

    This is the oat roller Joost uses for those having trouble finding his store.
    http://byjoost.com/store/category/catalog/page/2/

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  • http://www.amessoles.com Tess Willcox

    Sarah this post was so truly inspiring. Thank you as always!!

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  • http://blog.isowhey.com.au ian chapman

    I thought I’d share with you a blog from my site written shorty after a visit to the Good Food & Wine Show – we talk about how you can save your own food (and money!) and waste less – I think we have to believe we CAN make a difference…
    http://blog.isowhey.com.au/2012/07/12/could-you-live-out-of-your-fridge-for-a-week/

    [Reply]

  • https://www.facebook.com/Happy.Healthy.and.Whole Tegan @ Happy Healthy Whole

    This was so flippin’ inspiring! Thanks Sarah for introducing us to such a fab little organisation.

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  • http://www.queenofsheba.com.au Queenie

    Oh gosh, I think I’m in love!
    That was what I’ve always thought about water. It’s got to move! When I was growing up a part of the country which is full of rivers and streams, we were taught to never drink from still water – find the rapids or the waterfall and drink from there. There is a different energy. I HATE bottled water, I think it tastes dead. And In Australia, we are so lucky that we can turn on a tap and drink, we should be dancing around for joy. Not adding to the mountains of plastic by buying dead water.

    Looking up oat roller now. Please tell Joost he is a legend!

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  • Colleen

    I am intrigued to hear Joost’s comments on water needing to be moving to be good because I’ve always noticed cats don’t like still water – even on hot days it remains untouched. My cat will take any opportunity to get his water fresh, leaping up onto the bathroom or kitchen sinks when I turn the taps on and drinking directly from the flow. He even prefers drinking water out of the toilet bowl to out of his own bowel. I’m not being flippant; the message that the cat is elling us is that water is best fresh and recently drawn.

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  • Lizzie

    Hi Sarah

    Check out London shop Unpackaged which was set up as an experiment in offering groceries packaging free. The owner, Catherine, also offers consulting for big business to do the same. They have been so successful they have expanded in a very short time and now have a cafe. http://beunpackaged.com/

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  • Betty

    How do oats fit into your paleo diet? I’ve just started reading up on the paleo thing and was thinking of following it, but thought I read that oats were no good because they’re a grain.? But I guess it depends on each person and their own body reactions…
    Looking forward to my experiment with it.

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  • Bec

    Great video Sarah and a timely reminder we can all improve the way we eat and dispose of food and food packaging. Joost really walks his talk. I’ve decided 2013 is the year I try to grow more food, buy food without packaging and really minimise the waste our household produces. Thanks again.

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  • Gemma

    Hi Sarah,

    Great video. I was wondering what the name of the psychologist was – the one who started feeding his patients oats! I’m really interested in this idea of healing depression through what you eat.

    Thanks!
    Gemma

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  • Bea

    Hi, I know I’m a bit late to the party but thought I would check as I’m about to buy the flocino oat miller joost recommends… But then wondered if it would be worth it for making your own granola ??? I understand for using it in Bircher and I guess porridge as its cooked at a much lower temp than cooking muesli but wanted any thoughts on using the miller to retain nutrients without steaming/ the heat etc but then roasting them in the ovens probably counter productive???? Xx

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