11 sugar-free Easter tricks (plus free IQS shipping!!)

Posted on March 26th, 2013

A sugar-free Easter…I’ve done a few now. It is possible. You just have to come to regard pre-masticated, additive-addled chocolate confection as a vile non-food and a waste of your salivary glands. Which it is.

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Raspberry Ripple Easter friends, modified from my recipe (below) by The Rogue Ginger and shared on Instagram.

The last few weeks I’ve been in chocolate mode, putting together my next ebook…yes…a sugar-free chocolate cookbook. I’m not giving away too much yet, so you’ll have to make do with these ideas below for now. Many are based on recipes in my I Quit Sugar book. Which, as an Eastery bonus, you can

buy here from today and get FREE shipping!

* Save $7 if you’re in Australia.

* If you’re purchasing internationally, it’ll cost you a flat $7 for shipping (again, save $7). To anywhere!

* The FREE SHIPPING offer runs from today until April 8.

But to the ideas….

1. My raspberry ripple, with a Lent-breaking twist.  

This fun chocolate bunny (image above) is a great kid-friendly Easter idea. Simply set the ripple in a bunny/chick/egg mould instead of creating a bark, as set out in my cookbook.

Raspberry Ripple

  • 1/3- 1/2 cup coconut oil
  • 1/3 cup organic salted butter (be sure to use salted…the saltiness gives it a lovely kick)
  • 2 tbls raw cacao, or cocoa
  • 1 tbls rice malt syrup
  • 1/3 cup coconut, shredded or flakes (for a chunkier version)
  • 1/3 cup of frozen raspberries

Melt the butter and oil (in a pan or microwave…the oil takes longer to melt so add the butter a little after); stir in the cacao and syrup. Arrange the berries and coconut in the moulds. Pour the coconut oil mixture over the top and pop in the fridge for an hour or the freezer for 20 minutes. Serve direct from the fridge or freezer.

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Belinda Cecchini made these raspberry ripple treats in bunny and egg moulds.

2. Last year I shared fifteen tips and a few recipes for navigating Easter.

It includes a hot cross bun recipe for everyone who keeps asking me for one!!

 3. Try this fructose-free chocolate from Wild Patch.

You can order online, and have it delivered in time for Easter. We enjoyed meeting (and eating) this little guy in the I Quit Sugar office last week – thanks Linda. PS: Linda is a chocolate maker from the Blue Mountains, NSW, who did my I Quit Sugar program a while back, prompting her – yes, a chocolate maker! – to create a fructose-free line. Nice!

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4. Make a chocolate version of my almond butter bark. 

Super Natural Kids made the almond butter bark into a Jenga treat for her kids. Great idea. To make my original recipes chocolate-y, add two tablespoons of raw cacao powder to the mixture before you let it set. Voila!

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5. Pour the chocolate almond butter bark into egg moulds to make Easter eggs. 

To get the almond butter bark recipe, grab my I Quit Sugar book today (to get free shipping!).

6. Another idea: make my avocado and chocolate mousse.  

It’s healthy enough to eat for breakfast! And it’s also available in my I Quit Sugar book.

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Paleo Girly prepared avocado and chocolate mousse cups to help resist the Easter eggs!

6. Kick back with an Easter drink instead! 

Why not make a batch of chocolate peanut butter hot cocoa and relax guilt free. I Quit Sugar’s managing editor Jo made some for a friend after dinner one night. And. Of course. Instagrammed it…

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8. Make a batch of my chocolate balls. 

We found Sugar Free Jo‘s version on Instagram. She thinks they look like little poos. We think they look like Easter eggs. No?

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9. Another idea: make my chocolate nut butter cups (below) in Easter egg moulds instead. 

You can find the chocolate nut butter cups recipe in the I Quit Sugar cookbook. Once again.

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Chocolate nut butter cups, photography by Marija Ivkovic.

10. Sign up to be notified when the I Quit Sugar chocolate recipe ebook is released. 

We figured it’s about time we put together an I Quit Sugar chocolate ebook devoted to standout, nutritious, knock-a-Snickers-off-the-shelf chocolate-y goodness. If you’d like to be informed when the ebook is available, sign up below:

11. Buy a copy of I Quit Sugar, with free shipping! 

For the next two weeks, we’re offering free shipping on the I Quit Sugar book. A little Easter treat from us to you. If you’d like to get hold of a copy, click here.

Feel free to share your sugar-free Easter ideas below. I know everyone out there will appreciate it….Oh, and check out I Quit Sugar and the #IQS hashtag on Instagram…a stack of ideas on there, too.

 

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  • Rachel

    You just have to come to regard pre-masticated, additive-addled chocolate confection as a vile non-food and a waste of your salivary glands. Which it is.

    Really? That seems so judgmental to me. And so militant. Your recipes seem great and I’m all for the healthy eating sentiment behind it, but there’s more to life than just nutrients.

    I am in my mid 40s and each year still send my little sister (also in her mid 40s now – how did that happen?!) a Humpty Dumpty egg for Easter as that’s the egg we received every year as children.

    It’s a tradition that’s important to both of us – it links us to our past and connects us now even though we love thousands of miles apart.

    It’s not a vile nonfood and a waste of salivary glands. It’s an expression of love. Long live Humpty.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I totally get your sentiment. I just wish Easter gift manufacturers could use decent chocolate not full of cheap oils and sugar!

    [Reply]

    Rachel Reply:

    That, I’m with you on!

    [Reply]

    also called rachel Reply:

    In our society, sugar = love. I think it will take time to get used to replacing that (it makes sense though, because sugar hits that sweet spot of the brain, so we really do want our relatives to feel good), but I wish I could join in on the fun, without having to make my own. Having said that, I am looking forward to eating my homemade macadamia nut chocolate!

  • Joanna

    well said Rachel!! I also agree with healthy eating – but there is a lot of debate about coconut oil and I think you will find that most qualified naturopaths and nutritionists say that it is full of satuarated fat. I also find it amazing that you give so much advice about diet, when you are not a trained or qualified nutritionist or dietian or doctor or natural therapies practioner.

    [Reply]

    Brooke Reply:

    I have an idea… how about you don’t read it and go spread your hate somewhere else. also I think you will find education from Integrative Nutrition is amongst the many items in Sarah’s bag of goodies.

    [Reply]

    Nicky Reply:

    Hate? Really? such a strong word, chill!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Ah yes, but saturated fat is great!

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    OH, and agree…let’s not use the word hate too often!

    [Reply]

    also called rachel Reply:

    but most drs are so far behind on what makes for a healthy diet it’s not even funny…

    [Reply]

  • Brooke

    Thanks Sarah for your recipes and insite – I was wondering what I could take as a fructose free option to the many family gatherings which will take up most of the time this long weekend. I hate the commercial side of Easter and by hand making these sugar free recipes it helps make it so much more special.
    Thanks again Sarah and IQS team!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.anotherbeautifulmorning.wordpress.com Renee

    Thanks Sarah, have just ordered a stash from Wild Patch. I was just thinking about sourcing some 100% cacao choc for some kitchen experimentation – and there it is. Thank u and happy easter!

    [Reply]

  • Ms Jane

    Finally relented and got the print version. I’ve got every “e” everything you’ve ever done so figured I should I have this too!! And don’t worry about Humpty Dumpty…she had a great fall after eating all that sugar and cracked!!!

    [Reply]

    lilapud Reply:

    Haha that’s funny Ms Jane!

    Isn’t it interesting how easily some of us take offence, it baffles me sometimes …
    not that I agree with Sarah’s sentiment on this one, but I appreciate her artistic licence … and yours too with your Humpty Dumpty fall! Very clever!

    I choose to assume neither you nor Sarah intend any insult
    to anyone (sorta like automatically – without having to think about it too much!)

    C’mon people … keep it sweet, remember! :)

    [Reply]

    lilapud Reply:

    Oh and I appreciate all the info that is shared! Recipes and everything else!

    [Reply]

    Rachel Reply:

    Hi guys,

    I wasn’t offended by Sarah’s comments, just pointing out that food is about more than nutrients, specially at festival times. Draconian statements such as that one seem to me to be so loveless and simplistic.

    Ms Jane Reply:

    Just trying to lighten things up and have a laugh!! Gonna go suck on a carob, fructose/lactose/gluten free egg :)

    [Reply]

    Rachel Reply:

    Enjoy. :)

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Na, ditch the carob…it’s full of fructose!

  • Mia

    “You just have to come to regard pre-masticated, additive-addled chocolate confection as a vile non-food and a waste of your salivary glands.”

    If this is what eating sugarfree does to people, I dont want it. What a nasty thing to say.

    If your food obsession has reached the point where you need to say gross things like that in order to feel good about your choices in life, then there is something wrong with your relationship with food.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Nasty to the Easter chocolate manufactured by Nestle et al? I was just making light of it…!

    [Reply]

    Mia Reply:

    You sounded aggressive, that’s not usual for you. You’re usually more of a live-and-let-live person. The comment sounded like it came from a pro-ana website. Apologies if I took it the wrong way, I know I am more sensitive to ED-related things.

    Your regular readers worry when you don’t sound like yourself. Hope everything is ok. x

    [Reply]

    Gemma Reply:

    I completely agree with the vilifying food thing…my anorexia started with quitting sugar, I still want to be healthy, but food nourishes the soul as well as the body.

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    I’m fine, Mia. But I do – after a while – get miffed when I have to defend my robust thoughts about processed food and get told it’s some reflection of an imbalance in myself…or it’s because I’m scatty, or a public talk I did didn’t suit someone. I work tirelessly to de-vilify good, whole food. I’ve dedicated my career to it. To be accused of being unsupportive of those who battle EDs really upsets me. I DO think there are 23490285712397 better things to eat than cheap chocolate. Anyone game to look at what really goes into making Easter egg chocolate would have to agree…and anyone aware of the impact of mass commercialisation of food and festive times of year would have to be as jaded by the onslaught, no?

    Mia Bluegirl Reply:

    You once said to me, when I was being a dickhead about vegan trolls on this site – be your message. I always remembered that. Please dont let the fact that you are up against considerable forces in this quitting sugar thing turn you angry.

    I do understand what you are trying to say. I just related to it much better when you said it without the snark. You’ve never sunk to the level of your critics before, which made me respect your message more. You even interviewed Tony Abbott and kept an open mind.

    I really hope I didnt sound like I accused you of being unsupportive of people with ED. But telling us to quit foods by learning to view them as evil and bad? That’s a big red flag there. And that’s the exact mentality that got me & other women in trouble. I’m sure you would never include triggering sentences deliberately, so I apologise if I accused you of encouraging ED or anything like that.

    GiGI Reply:

    I just ate a yummy coconut milk chocky – free of crap – that I really enjoyed.
    I just don’t understand why people who don’t agree with Sarah keep reading the blog.
    I just want to read what people have to say about being sugar-free and how it makes them feel, etc.
    I’m not interested in people being nasty to Sarah. It’s just not necessary.
    I feel great not eating sugar and I’m interested it making my diet better.
    If I don’t agree with something Sarah says, or I think that it’s not going to work for me, I just don’t take it on board.
    Is it so hard to just leave it alone?

    [Reply]

    Kelly Reply:

    I’m a relative newbie to Sarah’s blog, having come to it from her presenting on the TV show Eat Yourself Sexy, and finding such a huge amount of depth to her experience, and consequently knowledge she willingly shares via this site. I must admit, I’m not sugar-free – but does that preclude me from reading Sarah’s blog and taking an interest in what goes on here? I think its healthy that people can have differences of opinion and be prepared to share them. I think its dangerous when one person is held up to be some sort of messiah and that by taking an opposing view, the naysayer is then lynched by all the followers!! I’m sure Sarah doesn’t intend this – and certainly – her comments suggest she is game for all to openly share their views. So how about no one is picked on for disagreeing or agreeing, but rather their comments are respected for being their opinion, to which we are all free to agree with or disagree with, silently or vocally, as we each see fit?

    [Reply]

  • Olive@hotmail.com

    Oh I agree Mia, what is happening here?

    Easter is such a magical time of year, the childhood memories it creates, the joy and laughter, the easter egg hunts – and what better way to celebrate Easter than with family, friends, and delicious real chocolate!

    Sarah, I heard you speak this month and I worry about where you are heading. I found you very ungrounded and almost scattered in your delivery and I hope you don’t use your power to mislead people, particularly when you yourself admit you don’t really know what you are doing.

    I understand you have helped a lot of people who suffer from Auto Immune and this is fantastic, but please be careful with your regimented preaching and encouragement of women (and men) to develop certain, very restricted ways of eating. It appears you could be creating a breeding ground for eating disorders to develop, particulary amongst young women who are just beginning to tune into their bodies and discover what feels right for them.

    BALANCE is the key. It always has been and it always will be.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    For me, Easter is a celebration of death and new life…I grew up Catholic. I go home to be with my family every Easter and I go to church with Mum (to support her and to be reminded of the spiritual and pagean traditions of renewal). I cook with my brothers and we spend time together. My family doesn’t like the consumerist rituals of Easter and Christmas, so we don’t buy cheap, commercial chocolates. Just saying…
    Also, I’m not sure that I’m regimented. I’m sorry that you read it that way.

    [Reply]

    Olive@hotmail.com Reply:

    Hi Sarah,

    Yes, I too was raised a catholic and in my family new life is and still is the focus of the day… a little bit of chocolate just added to the beauty, especially as a young child!

    [Reply]

    Ms Jane Reply:

    Who new chocolate could be so controversial!! Happy Easter Sarah. Here’s to new beginnings x

    [Reply]

    Gemma Reply:

    It’s not about the chocolate itself, it’s the about the slippery slope that occurs when the message switches from ‘adding extra coconut oil/greens to replace fructose-foods’ to the avoidance of ‘vile non-food’.

    For you it may not be restriction, but others are more vulnerable to these opinions. I have followed this blog from the start & quit sugar when you first did.

    It seemed healthy, but if we are going down the line of dramatic statements quitting sugar nearly killed me. It started with fructose, the developed into orthorexia, then anorexia, then I lost more 1/3 over my body weight (I started off underweight). Then my body started shutting down.

    I used to be a happy adult who only ate processed food every few months – now I have a panic attack if I’m forced to eat fruit. Most people will just end up a little healthier, but for some people that little trigger is all it takes to unlock this disease.

    Please don’t fob off people who are concerned about these messages, it’s hard enough ignoring mainstream media, without trying to decipher pro-ana disguised as pro-health.

    [Reply]

    sarlm Reply:

    This strikes a chord that I didn’t realize existed with me Gemma. I quit sugar around the same time and I now feel almost afraid of fructose and feel extremely guilty about eating fruit or something similar because the IQS program. For someone more sensitive than me, it could be hard to attempt a balanced diet which includes some fruits and sugars.

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for conscious, healthy eating and cutting way down on fructose is important but it’s just food for thought.

    Emily Reply:

    Completely agree Sarim. I quit sugar about 2 months ago, but I don’t put limits on what type of fruit I eat. Honestly, I don’t even like berries and kiwi fruit that much, I prefer bananas and apples ANY DAY. So I eat it – shock horror.. bananas and apples! But I eat it mindfully and that is all that matters. I think the point of the program is to make people aware that fruit is full of sugar and therefore not eat 4-5 servings a day (which is what i used to do thinking i was healthy). My thoughts are though, ‘if it grew in a garden, its good for you.’ In my opinion it’s still better than something packaged up and made ‘fructose free’.

  • Yvette

    hi Sarah,

    I’ve been following your IQS progress for a little while now, having been introduced to the paleo diet and various other health-related activities/ways of life…

    What I struggle with is the emotional tie to these foods – as I think Rachel pointed out earlier. I’m not even thirty, considered clinically obese (though I really don’t look it) and looking down the barrel of insulin resistance and pre-diabetes. I realise what I have to do, but how do you shut off the self-sabotage and the little voice that says “you work so hard in every aspect of your life, why do you have to be so strict with what you put in your mouth?…” such a devil of a voice that one.

    I don’t want to get all whiney and Sh!t (and I take complete responsibility for my actions) but – WHY DIDN’T THEY TELL US SOONER?! Why now, when my slightly older metabolism can’t mask the symptoms of ingesting too much refined sugar over a number of years do I have to come to the realisation that the food product I’ve come to rely on for that ‘instant pick-me-up’ is actually my worst enemy.

    It’s like finding out your dog didn’t really get sent to a farm to grow old. Living in blissful ignorance for all those years.

    Now that I’ve come to this realisation I have to be all adult and take the appropriate actions. Thank goodness for you and others like you that are actually human (underneath the public facade) and have real insecurities like the rest of us that provide guidance and non-confrontational ways to get the devil off your back (or waistline as it may be).

    Thank you again and keep up the great work.
    Yvette

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    Hi Sarah, I really think today’s post couldn’t have come at a better time! I have been doing the IQS program since January & love making my choc peanut cups! I’ve gone from a commercial chocolate addict to thoroughly enjoying my own sugar free raw cacao creations with your help! We are celebrating Easter with family at the beach and I stocked up on all the ingredients today to make plenty of sugar free options so I don’t get tempted by those sugar laden options all wrapped in coloured foil!!! I didn’t read the post as aggressive, I took it as some strong advice to keep all of us who’ve found sugar free freedom on the right path at a very tricky time of year. Thanks for the great advice you provide. I feel like I can really ‘taste’ food again! Much like a smoker describes after giving up cigarettes, its a fantastic feeling.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.ruthnorris.blogspot.com Ruth

    Hi Sarah,
    THANK YOU for this post! This has strengthen my (already strong) resolve to get through Easter without betraying my body and my tastebuds. I finished the 8 weeks last week and am shocked at how much I don’t want sugar anymore.
    THANKS!
    Ruth.

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    Pleasure!

    [Reply]

    Hayley Reply:

    Agreed! I’m amazed that after only four days someone with such a serious chocolate addiction as myself can now work all days with Easter eggs in the office sitting right under my nose and not even want any! Same with the Chupa Chup I was given after a vaccination – untouched. This is absolutely unheard of with me!

    Thank you Sarah, I feel like I can finally eat whatever I want without limiting myself as long as I generally stick to the principles of low/no fructose and healthy fats. I really hope I find enough time to make the raspberry ripple before I go away this Easter!

    One question – where is the best place to buy rice malt syrup?

    (PS the reintroduction of fats into my diet was the biggest surprise! It all makes so much sense now but I can’t believe how we’ve all had the wool pulled over our eyes for so long!)

    [Reply]

    Jude Reply:

    I buy rice malt syrup from Coles. It is made by Pure Harvest and is in the health food aisle, where they have their gluten free foods.

  • Justine

    Hi Sarah

    Your posts are great and people like me realize that u post such helpful things like how to survive Easter for people like us who want the tips & ideas. Quite simply – if you want to eat chocolate at Easter – then eat it?! No one is stopping you! But if you want to eat sugar free at Easter then how helpful is Sarah by sharing her ideas! Also, if you even read her post – then clearly you’re interested in sugar free living? If not, then don’t read and definitely don’t leave rude comments. Sarah isn’t forcing or preaching to anyone, simply sharing to HELP others! Easter isn’t about chocolate – it’s about clebebrating anyway u choose to. Keep up the awesome helpful posts Sarah – u are such a rock for those of us that choose to live sugar free for health benefits & for diet benefits. It sure is the best / easiest ‘diet’ I have ever been on… A diet that is delicious howza bout that! x

    [Reply]

    Michelle Reply:

    Hear hear Justine!

    [Reply]

    also called rachel Reply:

    I agree Justine – there are plenty of options for people (even low sugar people) who want to eat regular chocolate at Easter, if only eating sugar on genuine special occasions works for them, and Sarah is offering those of us who would prefer to have something made with cocoa, sans the sugar. If Sarah sees sugar as something she never wants to eat again – that her decision and she is entitled to that. Sugar does us a lot of harm and I can see why she feels so strongly about it.

    There are plenty of other ways to express love on Easter besides store bought chocolate, such as the recipes above – and for kids there are stickers, colouring books, toys, books, painting eggs, etc, if you don’t want to go the sugar route.

    Thank you for these options, Sarah!

    [Reply]

  • Anna

    Thank you Sarah, you cannot know what your book has done for me. It’s been the missing link in my life. I appreciate your newletter with your informative links and recipes. You have opened up a whole new world for me. As a mum and someone who lives with food intolerences I have learnt so many new ways to cook and new products are constantly being tried out. THANK YOU.

    [Reply]

  • Grace

    Wow. Chocolate is clearly an emotional topic for many people!! I love this post, Sarah. And I agree, once you’ve quit sugar that cheap chocolate does seem vile and unappealing. I hope the Easter Bunny brings me a Raspberry Ripple!:) xo

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  • Amanda

    Fantastic post Sarah. You have completely changed my life by encouraging sugar-free and I completely agree with your first paragraph! The thought of putting horrible commercial sugar-laden chocolate in my body now horrifies me. I am horrified by the amount of sugar I have put in my body over the last 30 years and truly believe that we were never meant to eat it. I wish everyone who wishes to say a bad word against your program would give up all sugar for 8-10 weeks and see how much better they feel (and how much worse they feel if they eat commercial milk chocolate eggs after that), and then reconsider if they still want to insult the good that you are doing!

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  • Monique Kelso

    Great post Sarah…I have had no idea on how I would approach this weekend and my cravings and you have given me the pep talk I needed so not to over endulge. Much like Xmas time I have always fallen off the wagon and I never feel great about it afterwards. A couple of years ago I was given far too much chocolate, endulged a little and got so depressed I threw the last away and went on a 2 hour walk!!! Always like your insightful maybe sometimes controversial words…. Thanks again!!

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  • Danielle

    Well said Lisa!! Many of us here have been sick for a long time just like Sarah was. You get to a point where you realise the crap that packaged products contain are like poison. Lowering your immune system and making way for disease. We appreciate Sarah’s knowledge and especially her recipes to help us on our journey to better health. If that is of no interest to you then go and eat your choccie eggs from the shop but don’t expect to be gaining better health.

    [Reply]

  • han

    Pretty sure Sarah is referring to the cheap “chocolate favoured” egg and bunny shaped sugar&oil that appears on our shelves this time of year, rather than good quality actual chocolate, chill out people, no-one’s taking your real chocolate away from you!!
    I can’t even eat a Lindt ball any more, that used to be my height of luxury but makes me ill now. Can still actually demolish a couple of rows of Green&Blacks 85% cocoa in a weak moment though, my idiotic Christmas binge just isnt letting up on me! So I won’t be turning to chocolate to celebrate Easter, it is not crucial to my happiness and that is actually the lesson I didn’t know I needed to learn when I gave up sugar. A lot of people have not discovered this, hence the visceral reactions you will get when people find out that you are “depriving” yourself of sugar. Yes, food is part of this worlds great enjoyments, but relying on food-any food-to make you happy is not balanced. I thought I needed sugar to celebrate Christmas and I’ve been paying for it ever since.
    Loved your answer about celebrating family and renewal at Easter Sarah. Amen to that. No chocolate needed.

    [Reply]

  • Miriam

    My two chocolate coins of input!

    First things: festivities are wonderful. Fact.
    But… Food is not a treat! Events are treats…. Well Atleast in my household.
    My gift/treat to friends this Easter is IQS print edition and some love filled raspberry ripple. My gift/treat to my 4 year old daughter, is a pillow that looks like mars, a day of making Easter masks, a good few hours wearing them. An Easter hunt of cardboard eggs and her choice of breakfast and extra story time.

    At her dads: Atleast $100 worth of cheap chocolate eggs. What ensues: constipation, headaches, irritability, dry skin, poor appetite. I don’t argue… I just let her know that food isn’t a treat! It’s the event that is…. And give her loads of liquids and probiotics.

    My family know not to give me chocolate. It’s taken years to teach them, but now they send a card and I kinda like that more.

    Merry Easter all.

    [Reply]

  • Kelly Martin

    Hi new to your site great ideas but I notice you used rice syrup which is sugar. I am on a sugar free diet to balance hormones & could you do recipes without sugar? I understand honey & certain types of sweetener have a slower absorption rate into the bloodstream but would love to see more sugar-free sites not using sugar like syrups as to me it kinda is the opposite of what I need. I have used bananas to sweeten, orange juice & I hear dates is a good natural sweetener.

    [Reply]

    sarlm Reply:

    Rice malt syrup contains no fructose, only glucose, so in moderation it is quite safe. Your body needs glucose for energy so I’m not sure why you can’t have it? Bananas, honey and dates are good sources of natural sugar but are quite high in fructose, hence why they aren’t featured in Sarah’s recipes I believe.

    [Reply]

    Emily Reply:

    Glucose is in everything – meat, vegetables, and as it so happens, rice malt syrup. Your body metabolises most things as glucose, so rice malt syrup is fine to have. I suggest you check out David gillespie’s book, ‘sweet poison’ which outlines the science of it all. Fructose is the enemy, I doubt Sarah would EVER use bananas, let alone dates which are extremely high in fructose and low GI in her sugar free recipes.

    [Reply]

    Emily Reply:

    I meant to say, dates are high GI.

    [Reply]

  • maria

    Wow, chocolate can be such a “touchy” subject.
    God gave us the gift of a brain, so its up to us to use it to the best of our ability.
    If you choose to eat chocolate, crap or not, eat it otherwise dont. It really is so simple.
    Some people have an incredible ability to complicate things.
    Keep your life simple, keep your food simple, but most of all keep smiling.

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  • Annie

    This is maybe a daft question but are the recipes in the print cookbook different to the e-book? My e-cookbook doesn’t have the raspberry ripple recipe for example? Thanks

    [Reply]

    Sarah Wilson

    Sarah WilsonSarah Wilson Reply:

    There are about 20 new recipes in the print book

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  • http://www.ffpress.com.au/ Glen

    Some of these reactions are simply bizarre.

    Chocolate is bad for the body. It’s really bad. And that’s what Sarah pointed out. It’s amazing that some people got so defensive about that.

    My wife and I have finished the eight-week program and feel better than we’ve ever felt. And it’s all thanks to eradicating the junk that lives in things like chocolate.

    Sometimes the truth doesn’t melt in your mouth.

    [Reply]

  • Willow

    Hi, Sarah (and everyone)!

    I’m not completely sugar-free and might not ever be, but the information provided here and in Sarah’s publications is very valuable and has helped me and my family drastically lower our sugar intake. The result is that we all feel better, have lost a few pounds (none of us were obese, but we all feel better a little lighter!), and we enjoy our food more. We eat loads of fresh veggies and fruit, some lean meats, and lots of healthy full-fibre grains. We all exercise more and sleep better too. In short, we’re healthier and happier.
    Food is not evil – it’s a gift and we need to just stay as close as we can to foods in their natural forms and not mess them up with additives and unnecessary flavourings (like too much salt or sugar). Doing that and caring for the planet – and one another – makes for peaceful, happy living, even in this stress-filled world.
    Thank you, Sarah!

    [Reply]

  • Ana

    Hi Sarah,

    Love your website, cookbook and everything else you do! Keep up the good work! Just wondering on which page the recipe for the chocolate nut butter cups is in the e-cookbook? Can’t seem to find it! All best to you and your efforts!

    [Reply]

    Belinda Reply:

    Hi, also cannot find the recipe for the chocolate nut butter cups. Did you have any luck yet ? If anyone could advise would greatly appreciate :-)

    [Reply]

    sarlm Reply:

    I am not even sure if this is Sarah’s exact recipe, but this is the one I use for peanut butter cups:

    1/4 cup plus 2 tbs unsweetened cocoa powder (I personally use raw cacao powder)
    3 tbs coconut oil
    3 tbs natural peanut butter (100% peanuts)
    3/4 tsp vanilla extract
    5-6 tsp honey (I use about 1/4 cup rice syrup instead)
    tiny pinch of sea salt
    The recipe I think said to you stevia but I don’t touch that stuff

    heat cacao, oil and peanut butter in a saucepan on low till liquified. Remove from heat, combine with other ingredients, taste to see if sweet enough to your liking. Pour into patty pans or something similar (I just pour mine into a silicon cup-cake tray). Put it in the freezer for about 20 minutes or until set, then keep them in the fridge!

    I hope that helps!

    [Reply]

    Belinda Reply:

    Sarim, that does help, thank you very much :-) Not worried about the stevia bit either as I also do not like.
    Thanks again !!

    [Reply]

    K Reply:

    I made these. Halved the rice syrup and added 2 tsp of Stevia. Anyway, they were the BEST! One of the nicest things I’ve tasted since quitting sugar. Thanks for sharing!

    [Reply]

    sarlm Reply:

    yay!
    I make them all the time. They’re perfect for sweet cravings and don’t make me feel disgusting after iIve finished them.

  • MegsWalms

    No one with a strong, public voice is ever going to please everyone. I don’t agree with everything you’ve written, but I love that you’re writing it. It’s the blessing that is free will. Don’t water down your message! If nothing else, you’re bringing issues to the forefront of our minds and encouraging people to think.

    PS – chocolate peanut butter cups are my newest effort from your book and if my housemates had left me one to try, I’d let you know how they turned out. The empty container spoke volumes! Thanks and happy Easter!

    [Reply]

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  • Ruth

    Here here to Maria – yes, some people do have an incredible ability to complicate things!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.emilylaurenalleman.com Emily Alleman

    Okay, so I have to ask… What’s the deal with rice malt syrup? Is that not just another form of sugar? Why is it better than maple syrup or honey?

    Thanks! Love your blog!

    [Reply]

    Karly Reply:

    Agreed Emily… have been wondering about rice malt syrup. I understand is is low GI and your body absorbs it much differently to regular sugar… but does it have no fructose? Is that the key to why it’s “better”? Confused!

    [Reply]

    Hayley Reply:

    And is Rice Syrup and Rice Malt syrup the same thing? I found ‘Rice Syrup’ in Thomas Dux this morning but it was 30ml sugar per 100ml so I didn’t buy it in case it’s not the same as rice malt syrup… If they are the same does that figure just mean it’s glucose not fructose?

    [Reply]

    also called rachel Reply:

    rice malt syrup is digested the same as glucose, except it tastes a lot sweeter, probably more of an equivalent to honey and great for making anzac biscuits with. so yes, it is a ‘safe’ sweetener, but remember, if you eat too much of it, you still might put on weight because it is still sugar (glucose). i buy my RMS from the health food section at coles for around $4 a jar.

    [Reply]

    Kelly Reply:

    Hey really good point!! I’m trying to understand this sugar thing, and why fructose in particular has been singled out as the big baddie. I’ve been doing a little scientific research to investigate this, and I understand that all sugars ultimately get broken down into three single sugar units (monosaccarides) – either glucose, fructose or galactose for absorption from the gut into the blood stream after eating. Once in the blood stream, everything first gets channeled to the liver for processing, glucose goes straight through back into the blood to be used for energy (and if too much there, stored in muscle cells, and if they’re too full, turned into triglycerides (ie fat) and put into fat cells), but fructose doesn’t make it through the liver, it is converted into glucose in the liver to then follow the glucose pathway. Basically all monosaccarides eventually become glucose to be used in the energy pathway. I understand that some research is saying that fructose is responsible for elevating triglyceride levels and thus leading to cardiovascular disease risk (high cholesterol etc) whereas glucose raises blood sugar levels and thus too much over time predisposes to insulin resistance (ie insulin no longer works to shovel glucose into cells, so it continues circulating dangerously in the blood). Both of these outcomes seem equally negative. But the big question I have is what form fructose are they investigating???? Fructose from high fructose corn syrup (ie prepared from corn) is different to natural fructose found in fruits. I’m pretty sure for ease they would be testing HFCS not the fructose in fruit – so I’d like to know if eating moderate amounts of fresh organic fruit is really such a no-no? If these are naturally occurring sugars that aren’t eaten in excess in a diet that is not overloaded with other crap etc (and all the other provisos). Can anyway answer that for me?

    [Reply]

  • Courtney

    This is awesome thank you… I made hot cross buns thanks to a recipe from another helpful reader of your blog – Gluten, Dairy and Sugar Free! With a couple of substitutions..

    http://www.thehealthychef.com/2013/03/healthy-hot-cross-buns

    They were delish! http://instagram.com/p/W3jgjuKNXF/

    [Reply]

  • Kayla

    Wow, I feel like heaps of people have read the opening statement of this post in a tone that wasn’t intended. For me, it read as a reasonably light hearted “guys, if you want to get through easter without succumbing to the cheap, nasty, additive ridden commercial crap we’re bombarded with each year, you’re gonna have to take a pretty tough stance!”. Just wanted to say Sarah I think I got where you were going with that. Happy Easter x

    [Reply]

  • Maddy

    I ordered the I quit sugar ebook and paid by credit card. However my iPad stated that safari could not download it ?. Hoping you could offer some insight Ty

    [Reply]

  • Charmaine

    Thankyou, your post just inspired me to make our own Easter treats to share with family & friends, my little boy will love doing this together. Thankyou & Happy Easter!!

    [Reply]

  • Carissa

    YAY! Took advantage of the free shipping!!! Cannot wait to start my Sugar Free journey :)

    [Reply]

  • Hayley

    Does anyone else find the almond butter bark sickly greasy? Any tips to tone the fatty taste down a bit? I guess it’s mainly the coconut oil?

    [Reply]

  • Helen

    Hi all,
    IQS at the start of 2013, all goingreally well, except that it is helpign to uncover some other masked problems including an allergy to dairy, so right now I am fructose, dairy adn wheat free. I am wonderign if anyone has made the chocolate rasberry ripple treast with a substitue for butter? Would cocount butter work?
    Thanks, and thanks sarah for the inspiration and the Easter ideas!

    [Reply]

  • Angelika

    Thank you Sarah,
    The concept of substituting nasty, factory, oily, left over chocolate to create Easter eggs with healthy, nutritious and better for you ingredients for chocolate ideas is a God send!!! I appreciate your great recipes and ideas :)

    People constantly complain about the guilt they feel from eating chocolate- what you have done is given them alternatives, healthy and fun things to make and enjoy WITHOUT the guilt. And what do you get in return? People hating and complaining about your choice of words and what “love” chcolate brings them which you supposedly have insulted.

    I have your e-books, I have been read them back to back numerous times, love how I feel and follow IQS and never ever have I felt deprived, starved or wasting away. The people who write about eating disorders clearly have never read your books or your comments about the joys of good healthy eating and that you stand for everything but for starvation.

    It’s easy to blame an eating disorder on any diet, but it’s harder to admit not following IQS properly, starving and skipping meals and then binging. As you mention in your books, IQS is not a quick fix weight loss programme, it takes personal strength and dedication to feel the difference, change up the diet and choices and give up the sugar addiction.

    I for one love your work, the way I feel on the inside and out, the way it’s helping me with my auto-Immune disease and getting back to basics of real wholesome healthy love.

    People who compare sugar with love, need a reality check, as to date I have never ever met anyone who would say that sugar brought them utter and complete happiness.
    I guess there are people who can’t handle a bit of sweet truth, in that case please take it with a pinch of salt.

    [Reply]

  • Kirsty

    Wow! In my opinion Sarah is expressing her views and opinions well, I personally think being aware of what we are eating is the most important message. I am currently trying to follow a paleo and sugar free diet however if I feel like eating or drinking something non paleo or full of sugar then I will have it guilt free! As long as I feel 80% happy with my diet then that’s good enough for me. Please everyone stop being so obsessive and enjoy food ensuring you are balanced and informed xxx

    [Reply]

  • Debra

    People defending the mass-produced chocolate on here are probably addicted to it. Can’t they see the damage all that white sugar does? I so agree with Sarah. There are much better alternatives.
    Chocolate brings up a lot of feelings in people, related to love I guess, and so will defend it to the death! :o)

    [Reply]

  • Karen

    I’m about a year sugar free and feel very fortunate to have supportive colleagues as I’ve heard this can be a challenging area for others. Yesterday there was an Easter Egg hunt in the office and colleagues had thoughtfully bought me a beautiful bunch of flowers instead of an Easter Egg. This kind gesture added more sweetness to my day than any chocolate could!

    [Reply]

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  • Kirsty

    Hi Sarah,
    I’m really looking forward to trying the raspberry ripple, I just wanted to ask a bit of advice. I have one little girl coming for easter who is dairy free, is there anything I could use to substitute the butter? Do you think something like nuttelex would be ok?
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    also called rachel Reply:

    You might want to ask whether Nuttelex is ok, on david gillespie’s sweet poison page – http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sweet-Poison/157501174289687 it might be one of the unsafe oils.

    You could always use coconut cream, maybe?

    [Reply]

  • Louise

    David Gillespie also says that artificial sweeteners are ok, and there has been loads of stuff written about the various ills they can produce. I have used coconut butter plus a pinch of salt in place of butter – or if you’re going to eat nuttelex once, rather than a life long habit – I’m sure it would be fine

    [Reply]

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  • Ange

    These recipes all look amazing but one concern I have is the cost of the ingredients. Here in Auckland for example, a very small jar of coconut oil is around $10 in supermarkets. That’s tough when you need 1/2 a cup for some recipes. Anyone know a cheaper place to get it?

    [Reply]

    Gemma Reply:

    I think just focus on the veggies & standard healthy fare, then just buy a sugar-free treat occasionally…it makes it more special and that’s what it should be, even sugar-free, if you eat too many of the dessert foods you run out of room to eat all the veggies your body needs.

    [Reply]

  • Stacey

    Hmmm I must be the only sugar-eating vegetarian amongst Sarah’s readers… I quit sugar in January and I couldn’t really feel any difference, brought it back in about a month ago, still no difference… Maybe I didn’t do it for long enough – maybe I just don’t really eat much sugar anyway. I never crave it, but sometimes dessert is nice. I made poached pears for a dinner party dessert – cue shock and horror – they were awesome! I’ve got zero health issues. Maybe I’m a ticking time bomb or maybe vegetarianism and a little bit of sugar isn’t a death sentence! Just sayin…

    [Reply]

    Vegan Reply:

    Stacey, do you eat much fat?

    I’m curious because I’m low-fat vegan & seem to have no problem with sugar. I only eat sugar in fruit & vegetables but I do eat these in abundance (5+ fruits & 8+ veggies a day).

    I’m starting to wonder if the issue is sugar & fat together??

    It seems like people are thriving on the paleo (or paleo-ish) diet & I also know many people thriving on a low-fat mostly raw vegan diet…can’t seem to work out which one is “better”…

    Maybe the key is just to go one way or the other, but not both – which is really what processed foods are…

    [Reply]

    K Reply:

    I agree. One or the other. Bit like oil and water though..they don’t mix.

    [Reply]

    KG Reply:

    I quit sugar back in October and after 2 months of no lapses and no fructose at all (didn’t even introduce it from week 6), I felt no difference either – no weight loss, no change in bloating, no change in energy levels, no change in my moods. I reintroduced some fructose around Christmas and a bit of refined sugar to see what happened and felt no different.

    But – I’m not vegetarian and I still eat (a limited amount of) fat. I was pretty despondant with the fact that quitting sugar had no positive physical or mental effect on me, but I came to the conclusion that sugar just doesn’t appear to have a massive effect on my body. I really did expect to experience benefits from quitting sugar as although I’ve consciously reduced my fruit and refined sugar intake over the past 10 years, I was also quite dependent on dark chocolate to boost my energy levels. I no longer crave chocolate, which is great, but it would be nice to have the benefits that most other sugar-quitters seem to experience!

    That was a long way of saying some people don’t seem to respond to quitting sugar and I’m not sure there is an underlying reason why!

    [Reply]

    Debra Reply:

    Hi KG,
    If you get into the blood type diet, it says there that although all blood types can handle limited refined sugar, the non-secretors can’t, of which I am one. Had a massive effect on me, giving up sugar. All non-secretors are generally more sensitive to foods and environment anyway, and so much more likely to have health issues and be searching out/researching info like this. So blood type diet would make sense that some people can handle sugar, some can’t. And I think everyone is affected if they overeat it of course.

    I found dark choc the last thing to give up too! Finally managed it and, like you, don’t crave it, or sugar, any longer. :O) HTH

    [Reply]

  • maria

    Can anyone help me out on this query. Bananas are consider high GI yet the fructose amount is very low. GAPS say its ok to eat them as long as they are ripe (i believe the riper they are the less sugar?) I do love bananas and miss them. Yet some books ok them while others say stay away.

    [Reply]

  • Helen

    Hi. Made the raspberry ripple at the weekend. Pretty awful really. It tasted like frozen butter and coconut oil. We couldn’t get hold of vanilla powder so we used vanilla essence (the real stuff) so maybe this was the reason it didn’t work. Well try again with vanilla powder and hopefully it will improve.

    [Reply]

    Ellie Reply:

    Mine was a bit of a fail too – anyone have tips on how to get it right? I found with the mousse I couldn’t handle the bitterness of raw cacao and had to dilute it and balance it with more sweetener and salt. Is this just a function of being a white/milk choc lover who can’t handle dark chocolate, or do I need more practice/tips with this kind of cooking??? Also, do the other recipes in the chocolate cookbook cater only to the dark chocolate lovers or are there options for those of us that can’t handle it?

    [Reply]

  • Katty

    Hi Sarah,
    IQS back in May and have not missed it one little bit. Thank you for all your research into sugar. I found your book so motivating and a great read.

    I have a huge favor to ask – or of anyone reading this, can you suggest a great recipe for my wedding cake?

    I get married in just over a month and would love to be able to enjoy some of my wedding cake. IQS all the way!!

    [Reply]

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