Last week I shared some bits I found interesting in writer Meghan O’Rourke’s essay “What’s Wrong With Me” in New Yorker magazine. She has the same disease as me: hashimotos, with a side order of several other (possibly) related vague autoimmune (AI) conditions. And her insights touched me – and you guys – big time.

Photo by Edun
Photo by Edun

But I saved the bit that REALLY grabbed me in the guts for this post.

Have you ever thought you knew Everything about Something, but then you read something that really stopped you in your tracks? It stops you so abruptly because it’s so blindingly obvious. How could I have missed this? A total A-ha! Moment.

In her essay, O’Rourke shares her frustrations about how no one really knows what causes AI, nor what will fix it. It’s “shadowy”, she says. For some it can be a matter of taking the drugs, and off they go to live normal lives. I know lots of folk like this. I’m happy for them. But if, like me and O’Rourke, you let the disease tangle for too long before getting help your clusterf*ck of symptoms  won’t be unraveled with one pill. And, so, like me and O’Rourke, you can develop a domino-ed set of other AI conditions.

And so the “morass of uncertainties” twists tighter.

Like me, O’Rourke reaches a point where she’s largely able to manage her disease through diet – no gluten, no sugar, meditation, kefir, avoiding nightshades, etc. etc. I’ve tried it all. And it’s all required to maintain something resembling a normal life when you have a tricky AI.

But, and this is the two points of note:

  1. She hasn’t been cured as such. The “flares” and cycles continue.
  2. Her focus on trying to find a cure, and on controlling the AI, has seen her AI control her.

Her A-ha moment comes, however, when her endo delivers blunt news after a  “lapse”. Despite her best efforts to control things with her lifestyle habits, she seems to go backwards, causing her to lament, again, that no one knows what the hell is going on. Says the endo to O’Rourke: “This may just be how it’s going to be. You may always feel like you’re eighty per cent.”

Wow. And shit. And tears.  And just for good measure, let’s read that again:

You may always feel like you’re eighty per cent.

80 per cent. And that’s at your best. What are the implications of this?

For me, it’s relief and sadness in equal measure. It’s a fact: I’ve not felt beyond 80 per cent – even on my best days – in six years. I’ve grasped and reached and tried in an effort to get beyond this ceiling. One day… one day I’ll feel good again. To think this is actually out of reach for the rest of my life saddens me to the core.

But, to be honest, the simultaneous relief I feel is greater than the sadness. For it gives me a leave pass from trying and reaching so hard. And I can back off.

I realise I have a choice. I can keep being the frustrated, forever reaching “sick” person. Or I can get OK with 80 per cent. And get on with the remaining years of my life.

In more dramatic moments I’ve wondered if it’s worth living if I can’t get back to normal, if I keep failing and lapsing.

But with this slight shift of perspective I can see peace is about  accepting “a new normal”.

As O’Rourke says: “You can’t muscle your way through the enervation and malaise of autoimmunity”. You have to ride with it. More than this you have to switch your gallant and brave efforts from trying so bloody hard, to being OK with 80 per cent. This is a noble cause – for us and those around us.

O’Rourke’s endo adds this: “You’re not nuts…We just might not be able to do anything to help you.”

This is OK, too. What do you think?

Have your say, leave a comment.

  • Shelley

    I know that I am probably a bit ‘late to the party’ commenting on this post, but I would like to say thank you for sharing what so many people need to realise about having any type of AI… you need to create a new ‘normal’.

    If 80%, or 60% or 30% is as good as you may feel then guess what? That’s your new 100% normal. If you have a day, an hour or a moment when you feel better than your new 100% – revel in it!

    When I was first diagnosed with SLE I had to change my 80% to my 100% and I also eliminated the word ‘disease’ from my vocabulary. It’s a condition…. a condition that I have to manage, not a disease. And when someone, anyone tries to tell me that it is a disease, I politely remind them that the word ‘disease’ is quite negative and I prefer the word condition.

    Also, if you stop comparing how you feel today to how you used to feel ‘before’ life gets a little easier. Life ‘before’ is done. It.Is.Over. You have a new life now and personally, my new life is about 1,000 times more evolved than ‘before’.
    ‘Before’ I took my body for granted.
    Today, I am more aware of everything that goes on in my body.
    ‘Before’ I watched what I ate.
    Today, I am what I eat.
    ‘Before’ exercise was something that I did.
    Today, exercise is something that I need.
    ‘Before’ I had no idea.
    Today, I know and I wouldn’t change a thing.
    That’s right, for all the pain, the fatigue, the weird random skin things, the fuzziness, the lack of fine motor skills that hits at the most embarrasing times and the moments when SLE just gets me down… I wouldn’t change a thing.
    Thanks Sarah 🙂

  • Sam

    Thanks for this post. Having multiple AI diseases including Hashis I know something of the roller coaster ride. I think the 80% idea is useful when one may be going through a phase of exhaustion, pain etc, but to be honest, it doesn’t work for me as a general rule. Strangely enough, I managed to get into a state of health a year or so ago that was the best I’ve ever been in my life, including all the years before I got sick. It was astounding. I’m not in that space right now, but having experienced it, it is my motivation to get to that wellness space again. If I were to settle for 80%, I’d miss out and that wellness experience has been my driving force for research, investigation, study, exploration and building a picture of how to tackle multiple AI diseases, how to live with them, how to identify and ameliorate the triggers and so forth. It’s also my motivation to find ways that I can eventually pass on to others to help them. So I’ll aim for 80% on my really bad days when I feel like 30%, and when I’m at 80%, I’ll continue to reach for my version of 100%. Thanks for your work Sarah – it’s good that you raise awareness for many of us AI people. 🙂
    PS: Love the glasses by the way – must snaffle myself a pair or two.

  • gibbo

    Yeah this is true. I’m a guy with two autoimmune diseases that cycle between each other and its often like ice skating – never knowing when one or the other or now days both will kick in for a month or so. Its easy to become so paranoid with diet and over doing things that you forget to live. For the first five years of my AI adventures I just pretended I was normal and made excuses; the second five years I spent looking for a magic bullet and became paranoid about trying not to being on flares.
    now I just go with the flow to a degree and try to accept that I’ll be sick some of the time, perhaps there will be a cure in tye future but I can’t control that and that I’m better off living and being sick sometimes than living in a bubble and being sick slightly less 🙂

  • Marian

    This is what I needed today, the first day of 2014 and the first day of the rest of my life. I’ve had Hashi’s for years and with all the supplements and stuff I’m taking, I only feel slightly better. A good day is 60%. It’s time to do a better job with my dietary options starting today. The day my endo told me the sonogram on my thyroid looked like “Swiss cheese” I knew nothing would cure this condition. So I must do a better job with what I’m feeding my body and strive for that 80%!

  • (Another) Genevieve

    Hi Emily, just wanted to chime in too. I used to get chronic extremely painful heartburn everyday. You didn’t mention it either so maybe you haven’t tried it – after I completely cut out starches and sugary juices and yoghurts from my diet I stopped getting heartburn. So no flours, potatoes, pasta, rice. It honestly worked 100% for me and I never get heartburn anymore. And trust me, the drugs actually make it WORSE in the long term.

    Chris Kresser has written about this a lot – if you’re interested just google his name and GERD.

  • Kadi

    Oh no! This sounds like giving up. Well, take a break from trying and reaching so hard if you need to. Of course, you need to be gentle with yourself. But I do believe that AI is curable. You already seem to follow L. Hay and W. A. Price ideas in your life. I haven’t followed you much so I don’t know have you heard of Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride and her GAPS (gut and psychology syndrome) diet? This could be your missing link… Have a little look at this amazing story: http://www.doctor-natasha.com/gaps-diet-testimony2.php and I’ve heard many stories like this from first hand myself! I’m only at the beginning of my own journey with my thyroid, PCOS etc, but I’m sure I’ll get to the 100%! And you too! xx

  • MTHFR Living

    Have you looked into root causes like viruses, bacteria and other toxins? Food sensitivities definitely cause inflammation and aggravate AI, but there is increasing evidence that viral and bacterial causes, along with other toxins in the body play a role…

  • Denise

    Thank you Sarah from the deepest part of me . Through your site and through the wisdom and generosity of the comments typed out in a shine of tears by so many … I have not found an open door and an Endocrinologist who greets me with the words ” I am here to help “.
    It appears that Hashimoto ‘s / Hypothyroidism sufferers do all of the running and the research into these conditions without any care , concern from a conservative and entrenched medical establishment .
    ” Primum Non Nocere ” is the sworn oath flouted by all of the Medicos I have met .
    My last bloods result = TSH 19.8 . I was screamed at and told that
    ” You are fine ” . And T3 therapy is quackery as is acupuncture , diet et al .

    Does anyone reading my words know of , can help with locating General Practitioners /
    Endocrinologists in Melbourne who are open to T3 therapy ? Or at the very least open to new science challenging the ossified treatment of Thyroidism in this country ?
    I am in uncharted waters and my next blood tests are 8 weeks into
    the future [ February 2014 ] . There has to be something to hold on to and and offer a certain hope that will see me in charge for the
    first time in 11 months .

    The following site offers so much …
    The School of Life
    Website
    London
    and also
    Melbourne
    Words , ideas , comfort and challenge at the highest levels …
    Hence the concept of ‘ Bibliotherapy ‘ .

    Grazie mille
    Denise

  • Sam

    Hello Sarah

    Such a great article – thank you for providing such amazing information a round hashimotos and auto immune – I too have hashimotos – wondered if I could ask what your journey has been on thyroid meds and which ones have you found that have suited you.
    I know everyone is different – at the moment considering starting the journey on thyroid meds but there is so much info out there – so many people say levo thyroxine does not suit them. Would be great to hear your I hear your input.
    Sam:)

  • Amy

    Have any of you tried this program for re-balancing the body?

    http://www.arltma.com/
    I have been doing it for the last 1.5 years, it is excellent. I was so bad when i started I could not leave the house, now I function better than the average person on the street. When I first started my thyroid was considered 90% inactive, now it is around 20% inactive. I am still going on the program and fully confident that it will be 100% active in the future.

  • Caitlyn

    I read the article and I was very touched. I have congenital hypothyroidism, which is not an autoimmune disease, but I understand the terrible “off” feeling when your levels go hectic and you realize that the 15 small symptoms you were experiencing all have a singular cause. I have had the disease for 24 years and am so thankful that I live in the time that I do, where medicine and blood tests are monitored. Recently, my levels went very haywire and I felt terrible for months, unsure of the cause, and at my wits end with my health. I googled everything…. everyday… looking for the healthiest diet, preventative measures for a multitude of illnesses, etc. The anxiety (increased by my thyroid levels) turned me into a hypochondriac. All I talked about was health, all I was interested in had to do with health. I began to annoy (and worry I am sure) my boyfriend, my family and friends with my health facts and food obsessions. The illness (and the fear of other illnesses) took over my life and my person. My levels have regulated, my hair is growing back, my energy levels are returning, and most importantly so is my sanity. The biggest thing this year has robbed from me was my sense of self and the purpose of life. Health is important, but you cannot and should not let it control you.

  • Linsey I recall the anxiety and overwhelm that came with serious symptoms and Drs telling me there was nothing wrong or all in my head (that really hurts). I knew it wasn’t all in my head because I have a VERY strong mind 🙂 I used my strength and perserverance to get answers- and finally I did. It’s funny, because the first person to believe me that my thyroid was out of whack was an intuitive naturopath- her belief in my buoyed me on. THEN I spoke to a great psychic/counsellor who assured me I wasn’t making things up & that I needed to pursue my own research to find out what was going on. Thank-goodness for those 2 intuitive women, I eventually found an endocrinologist to confirm my suspicion with tests & treat me accordingly. Even my GP had to apologise for siding with the first Endo & dismissing me! It was so hard, but there’s hope. Big love to you!

  • So wise Mia, thank-you!

  • Love this story Rachel- it’s made me smile 🙂

  • Eloriel

    Ohhh, I think I’m depressed now. That’s what I think. I’m just at the very beginning of my AI journey, so this is sad news re a potential outcome. OTOH, 80% of normal (from where I am right now) sounds like absolute heaven. I’ll take two!! So I guess that would be a real blessing, something to aim for, for sure.

  • Oh my gosh this just punched me so hard in the chest. I have Hashi’s (diagnosed following silent thyroiditis) and then shortly after having my daughter, psoriatic arthritis (PSA). My life has not been the same since and I was not naive enough to believe it would. But life is kind of shit. I have tried gluten free, alcohol free and all sorts of other stuff. Sustained, not just dabbling and nothing helped. My Hashi’s has always been relatively easy to control but the PSA is a total clu$&erf#ck. I have tried a few meds and all have initially helped and failed. I see this disease marching through my body and slowly destroying all I hold dear. I am an exercise physiologist and former competitive athlete and a lot of capability has been stolen from me.

    The “new normal”? You using those words floored me as I was just recently talking to my Rheumo about that and he refused to accept a “new normal”. But really I am starting to think there is truly no way to stop this beast. Am I willing to accept 80%? Hell yeah. 50% would do and a Rheumo who has one iota of understanding of outcomes. He tends to paint a rosy picture I crave to believe and it always fails. Sorry to be the misery guts. I am just struggling so hard right now. I wish you well on your journey and if you get to 80% you go girl!

  • Phyllis Perry

    I have wrestled with this, as well, in dealing with MS. When does working so hard to get “well” become so stressful that it becomes a kind of sabotage? Is acceptance permissible? Is that giving up? Recently, I’ve been wanting to merely get back to a higher level of functioning — your 80 percent. That shifts the burden a bit and makes things lighter.

  • David Horsfield

    Hi Sarah. I enjoyed reading your article and totally appreciate everything you said. I was first diagnosed approx almost 23 years ago and have lost count of the routine blood tests I’ve gone through in that time. I started with hypothyroidism then developed various anaemias, and for the past 12-18 months have been enduring various gut problems. I was pretty much resigned to a life of less than 100% a long time ago, however started fighting back again after a perceived threat of Lymphoma reared it’s ugly head. I took the following steps: 1. lose weight (I know this can be hard with AI conditions). Last year I knocked 18kg off. 2. I challenged myself physically to do things that I was convinced I couldn’t do, for example: fire walking and just recently skydiving. 3. I retrained my mind. I was convinced nothing in my life could ever improve (there was also a lot personal stuff going on), but by years (2013) end I no longer needed antidepressants to deal with stuff. 4. With every little goal I achieved I gave myself a reward. A short inexpensive holiday somewhere or a party with friends or family. Now, in reality physically not a lot has changed but I am definitely beating the 80% and living closer to 100%.

  • Lisa

    I found this post truly inspirational. I’ve struggles with feeling sick over the past 5+ years, only to be diagnosed with hashimotos last year. Although it made me feel better knowing that I did actually have something wrong with me (I wasn’t going crazy or being a hypochondriac) I totally can relate to this post! I have days where I feel amazing and have so much energy but then days like today I feel like I’m half asleep all day and come home exhausted. Hard to get my thinking around the fact that I will always struggle with energy and not be the ‘girl I was’. Thanks so much for sharing this!!!

  • Felicity

    I have had a lot of new normals over the last 3 years… of course things have changed, I will still live a healthy life and do all the things I can to maintain my good health.. accepting that this is my new normal is no excuse to throw my hands up and become a wino in a bad hat, waving my arms and conducting .the music only I can hear as I walk down the main street…. LOL Gotta keep on living and say I am accepting all that I have with gratitude and protecting this as a precious gift.

    In May 2011 I started on interferon treatment with antivirals for lifelong Hepatitis C.. I was born with it passed down from my mother who got a blood transfusion when she gave birth to my brother 2 years earlier .. I also have lived with bipolar all my life first manifesting to my knowledge when I was 4 years of age…. I started life at 80%…. So when I started on interferon (like chemo) I crashed hard, no immune system, anemia, lost the use of my thyroid… but the interferon and antivirals worked to cure my Hepatitis… so I hoped that I would maybe pop up to about 90% after treatment…. NOPE coz treatment triggered a massive bout of depression and anxiety which caused me to admit my deep dark secret of living life until now fighting the mental demons so I was diagnosed with bipolar AND agoraphobia, put on antidepressants and antianxiety medication and went into therapy.
    I thought maybe on medication I will feel better NOPE I gained 30kg instead and am now on permanent disability support pension due to mental illness….
    My immune system has been under attack all my life…. and now I sit at about 60% well… and this is my new normal…. my daughter is applying to be my caregiver as I have trouble going to busy shops on my own as I often have panic attacks.

    My greatest weapon against all of this ^^^ … is GRATITUDE… deep, persistent thankfulness for what I do have… every day I write at least five things that I am grateful for…for life itself, my kids, 2 arms 2 legs, my endurance and persistence, my fabulous hair 🙂 living in this country, in this era, …
    I am blessed…. and I am not giving up…
    I have HOPE. 🙂

  • josie

    Oh dear
    This is a weeping moment.
    Today is a real 30% day
    Thanks tho….good, no bloody great perspective!
    NOW Im going to sleep.
    Josie

  • Anjali B. Nelson

    Thank you thank you thank you. Honestly though, I’d be ridiculously grateful for 80%. I’ve been trying to accept 50-60% for the last few years.

  • Kimberely

    I’m currently at 40-50%. I’d be exhilarated with 80%! Great article!

  • Heather van Weerden

    Hi Sarah,
    I just found your blog today thanks to an instagram post by Sarah B on mynewroots. I have type 1 diabetes and have been living with it for 14 years now and I too can understand how it feels to be 80% as the norm. I think that I do let the disease control me sometimes, especially when I’m busy or stressed out or overwhelmed. I really appreciate your openess about living (and sometimes struggling) with an AI condition – sometimes I get frusterated and wonder how other people do it!
    Thanks so much,
    Heather

  • Claire

    Hello Sarah and friends, My sister has just enlightened me to the Sarah Wilson Sugar Free life style after she was given the book for Christmas. I had a quick read and thought woo hoo a positive solution. I have been diagnosed with Lyme disease or more pc in Australia a Lyme like infection that I have been aggressively treating for 2 years with antibiotics and herbals. My system needs more help and I need help with a diet lifestyle that is real! We are farmers and most of our produce comes off our property but our old style of cooking includes a lot of sugar in the form of jams, cakes and bread. I am excited to follow your blogs Sarah and will buy your book next time I take the long trip to Perth. Thank you x

  • Sazette

    Being a medical professional I find myself telling at least one person a day that maybe 80% is all we can offer – at the moment. The drive of the medical research community is huge, even if it is for financial not always altruistic reasons. It is wonderful to make another person feel healthier and that is addictive! So don’t forget that someone out there is working 24/7 to help you with the other 20%. It may not come this year, but look at what we have learnt in the last 5! Look at what we can do now compared to 1995…. Which feels like 5 minutes ago. Also doctors would rather offer you no treatment than an untested treatment.

  • Shelley

    Sarah thanks for your article. I do not suffer from Hashimoto’s but I do have an AI disorder (dry eye syndrome). I am wondering if you have any thoughts about the link between gluten and dairy with AI, also?

    • Tessy

      Isn’t dry eye an age/hormone related problem, much like needed reading glasses?

  • Marie

    Yes, so true. I invested over ten yrs (and many thousands of dollars) looking for answers both in and outside the box until last year I got critically ill and doctors finally started looking at AI disorders. Allergy diseases had never really been ruled in or out because of the broad spectrum of my reactions and increasing inflammation issues. Turning point was when I was put on a medication to help one issue and it helped resolve my reactions and long standing inflammation sites. I’m still recovering from that episode and my docs are saying we’re not a lot further ahead but I’m better then I was. Im now in a process of trying to replace the steroids I’m on with others that are safer for the long term. Those who have tried know its a tough road. Those like Sarah and Joe Cross and many commenter have given me hope and motivation to keep on with diet and lifestyle changes even though some days I just think why bother.

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  • Kelly Pribyl

    I think living with 80% and being ok with it so my AI disease doesn’t become my life is the right thing to do. I get tired of focusing on it ALL the time. However, there’s a part of me that will never stop trying to feel “better”. I’ll still read, research, and ask questions. I just can’t give up that hope.

  • Mia

    I guess That is the best way to describe it, “My new normal” of course we can’t all feel 18 again. That’s not normal. Just accept what you are today, and move on enjoying your new life. I get up every day tired, and then I think about my friend who is 35 and has been fighting cancer for 2 years now. She is happy, and she makes the best of her new normal. Then I stop thinking about how bad I may feel, and go on, enjoying my life in a different way now. No I won’t ever feel “FANTASTIC”, but I still am “normal.”

  • Nicole

    Wow Meagan I truly understand your conclusion to all this and I respect your decision. For me I can’t accept this 30percent for myself. I lost my job at the hospital and I am on permanent disability since the age of 46 years old. I have searched high and low to feel better doctors, tests like MRI ‘s Cat scans, twenty ultrasounds, minor procedures and pills. And it’s getting worse. My dream is to feel good enough to enjoy daily activities without feeling like my gas tank is running on empty and so exhausted and in pain that I need to lie down. This is emotionally draining depressing and a hard way to go through the rest of my life. What I recently found out was this….it all started for me) with low iron called ferritin. Mine was at 11 and women should between 60 to 80. Iron supplements don’t work well and the highest reading I can get is 36. Remember if your ferritin or in other words iron level is under 60 you’re body cannot convert t3 to t4. Once Iron is difficient long enough, chances are there is a low thyroid disorder. Keep in mind the lab test might say normal and you have all the symptoms of hypothyroid. And after years of improper treatment for this (t4) synthroid or levothyroxin came Fibromyalgia for me. Your TSH normal levels the doctors keeps telling you about, despite still having all the symptoms mean nothing. In fact TSH levels do not let you know that your thyroid gland is in trouble. My hair was falling out I was exhausted, I was cold all the time and had inside shivers. I had body aches and pains, constipation, digestive problems depression and severe anxiety, insomnia! and I thought I was crazy when a doctor would say nothing is wrong! I learned more about all of this through endless hours of research and Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum from Thyroid Summit. I have been listening to his treatments for months and I have learned more now then from any other doctor in the ten years it took to become this ill. These illnesses can be helped and you can feel a whole lot better. But finding a doctor that follows his protocol is difficult especially in Canada. An endocrinologist just doesn’t have the knowledge about treated thyroid much less your MD.If you can find an endo who will do a complete thyroid panel, test T4and T3 and look for thyroid antibodies despite your normal tests hats off to you! But I have not been able to. Desiccated Thyroid has t3 and t4 what your body needs and the dosage depends on how you feel not what the lab tests read. Look for Top Thyroid doctors in Canada , or Holistic Doctors who have experience in treating thyroid illness when the tests say you’re in the normal range so you must be crazy! I heard that a lot! Thyroid Mom also is a great website! I continue to research because I owe it to my myself and my adopted 6 year old boy who needs a mom that’s not bedridden most of the week! My heart goes out to all who suffer and my point was to share important information and give you hope on autoimmune illnesses. Brightest Blessings to all and good health!

  • Maggie

    I have AI issues – Hashimotos, endometriosis and interstitial cystitis. I detoxed a lot of bad stuff (lyme, heavy metals, viruses, etc. through various supplements), totally changed my diet – all organic veggies, lean protein, lots of good fat (coconut oil) and occasional fruit (carbs very rarely) – and incorporated supplements. I was only about 85% at that point and I still had flares. Once I incorporated Wobenzym and Buluoke (enzymes), and ashwaghanda for my thyroid, I was able to get to 95%. I am not in pain anymore. I still have immunilogic infertility – that is the most stubborn thing – which I am also working on. I believe that your body wants to heal itself and reach homeostasis, you just have to find a way to help it get there. I have hope that I will completely solve the puzzle and get there soon. In the meantime, I feel better than most non-AI people feel every day! Good luck to everyone!

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  • Natalie

    Amen, Fiona, my feelings exactly!

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    via email [email protected]

  • Tara Forrest

    Oh dear, I’ve never read anything so depressing & pessimistic in all my life !!!!!!! – you make Hashimotos sound like a terminal or life threatening, life ending illness! I’ve had very severe Hashimotos since I was 21, I take 250mg Thyroxine a day & I feel awesome – yes I get tired some days but so do all busy hard working mums – I gave birth to twins many years after being diagnosed, they are now 10, I’m a very hands on mum & at the same time I have been running a successful business for the last 14 yrs. I’m a blue belt in TKD, I run 6km a day + lift weights most days of the week – I’m fitter than most 20 yr olds & I can party with the best of them when I choose to (Not very often these days as I have other priorities/preferences) – I just don’t get the depressing spiel on Hashimotos ???? I’ve never let it worry me or stop me from doing anything & to that end, my mother, both my sisters, my grandmother & my Auntie all have Hashimotos too & they’ve just popped their morning thyroxine dose to counteract their deficiency & gotten on with their awesome lives. Too be honest I’m so glad that we haven’t been obsessing with doom & gloom over this completely controllable condition. I’m shocked when I read these articles that make it sound like its the end of the world because it’s far from not……

  • reading this is very comforting and makes sense. Need to hear it from others that deal with the same: AI’s just have to deal with, 80% is good….surely better than nothing and feeling like crap all the time.