How to heal autoimmune disease: the most insightful cure I’ve found (so far)

Posted on October 22nd, 2013

Last week I shared some bits I found interesting in writer Meghan O’Rourke’s essay “What’s Wrong With Me” in New Yorker magazine. She has the same disease as me: hashimotos, with a side order of several other (possibly) related vague autoimmune (AI) conditions. And her insights touched me – and you guys – big time.

Photo by Edun

Photo by Edun

But I saved the bit that REALLY grabbed me in the guts for this post.

Have you ever thought you knew Everything about Something, but then you read something that really stopped you in your tracks? It stops you so abruptly because it’s so blindingly obvious. How could I have missed this? A total A-ha! Moment.

In her essay, O’Rourke shares her frustrations about how no one really knows what causes AI, nor what will fix it. It’s “shadowy”, she says. For some it can be a matter of taking the drugs, and off they go to live normal lives. I know lots of folk like this. I’m happy for them. But if, like me and O’Rourke, you let the disease tangle for too long before getting help your clusterf*ck of symptoms  won’t be unraveled with one pill. And, so, like me and O’Rourke, you can develop a domino-ed set of other AI conditions.

And so the “morass of uncertainties” twists tighter.

Like me, O’Rourke reaches a point where she’s largely able to manage her disease through diet – no gluten, no sugar, meditation, kefir, avoiding nightshades, etc. etc. I’ve tried it all. And it’s all required to maintain something resembling a normal life when you have a tricky AI.

But, and this is the two points of note:

  1. She hasn’t been cured as such. The “flares” and cycles continue.
  2. Her focus on trying to find a cure, and on controlling the AI, has seen her AI control her.

Her A-ha moment comes, however, when her endo delivers blunt news after a  “lapse”. Despite her best efforts to control things with her lifestyle habits, she seems to go backwards, causing her to lament, again, that no one knows what the hell is going on. Says the endo to O’Rourke: “This may just be how it’s going to be. You may always feel like you’re eighty per cent.”

Wow. And shit. And tears.  And just for good measure, let’s read that again:

You may always feel like you’re eighty per cent.

80 per cent. And that’s at your best. What are the implications of this?

For me, it’s relief and sadness in equal measure. It’s a fact: I’ve not felt beyond 80 per cent – even on my best days – in six years. I’ve grasped and reached and tried in an effort to get beyond this ceiling. One day…one day I’ll feel good again. To think this is actually out of reach for the rest of my life saddens me to the core.

But, to be honest, the simultaneous relief I feel is greater than the sadness. For it gives me a leave pass from trying and reaching so hard. And I can back off.

I realise I have a choice. I can keep being the frustrated, forever reaching “sick” person. Or I can get OK with 80 per cent. And get on with the remaining years of my life.

In more dramatic moments I’ve wondered if it’s worth living if I can’t get back to normal, if I keep failing and lapsing.

But with this slight shift of perspective I can see peace is about  accepting “a new normal”.

As O’Rourke says: “You can’t muscle your way through the enervation and malaise of autoimmunity”. You have to ride with it. More than this you have to switch your gallant and brave efforts from trying so bloody hard, to being OK with 80 per cent. This is a noble cause – for us and those around us.

O’Rourke’s endo adds this: “You’re not nuts…We just might not be able to do anything to help you.”

This is OK, too. What do you think?

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  • Linsey

    Sarah, I have tears pricking my eyes. I have just finished your 8 week online IQS program and for the first 6 weeks I gradually felt healthier and more energetic. Then by the beginning of week 6 I crashed. I thought it was the diet, but as my dizziness, foggy head, confusion and slurred speech worsened over a fortnight I went to see my GP of three years last week. She flat out didn’t believe there was anything wrong but ordered some blood tests on my insistence because I have a family history of Hashimotos.

    I took the blood test results to another GP who again expressed her doubts that anything was wrong (‘make yourself get up earlier and do more exercise’). However because my TSH was above the recommended limit, she agreed when I asked for the antibodies test. I’m awaiting the result, which I will take to yet another GP.

    Looking through my first blood test results again I’ve noticed very high ALT levels and AST that has doubled in the last two years to be on the upper edge of the normal range. I also have below normal levels of globulin. I didn’t know what any of this meant so I googled it and found links to liver damage, which is linked back to hypothyroidism!!

    I came across IQS first, and then your blog, and discovered you had Hashimotos. I think it would have taken me a long time to connect together my symptoms if I hadn’t read your posts and then gone asking around my family about a history of thyroid problems. I’m 22 and I feel scared, but also grateful and thankful that you and so many readers on this blog have walked this path before me and are so supportive of each other in this space.

    Thank you x

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  • Carole

    Good article, followed by a variety of interesting comments.
    My overall summary, if I may be so bold, is that illness teaches us lessons if we are open & perceptive enough to learn them.

    At first, there is generally the disappointment. Then the belief that we will get better. Then the hope, the frustration, the sorrow of losing what we used to have — namely, good health, energy to do what we used to be able to do. And, a myriad of other emotions. Ultimately there’s acceptance. Acceptance that we need to change our diet, learn to relax and meditate, maybe do more gentle exercise. Learn balance, learn to love who we are the way we are. Learn to not feel embarrassed if are having a ‘low energy’ or ‘bad’ day. Create new expectations — governed by what we know to be our limitations. Learn to live up to OUR expectations and not those of others. Don’t feel bad if you need to cancel a dinner party or can’t attend a function.

    Learn to love and accept the new you. There is nothing wrong with trying to get better by adopting new practices, new diets, new beliefs, but hey, don’t beat yourself up over it.

    Do what you can when you can. Learn, read, research. In a positive way, find out as much as you can about how to improve your condition and embrace who you have become. That in itself removes the stress of trying to achieve something that may be unattainable.

    Learn to recognise what you can and cannot change.

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  • Sarah Wilson

    I’ve tried ACT. I very much rate it.

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  • Sarah Wilson

    Lovely wisdoms Mia. Nice to see you back here.

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  • Amy E

    This is me, but with 30%. I understand this article because the best I’ve felt since getting extremely ill 3 years ago (after a decade of quite ill) is when I finally gave up trying to find a cure or a treatment that helps in any way. Because nothing has ever helped and the constant rollercoaster of disappointments was unbearable.

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  • Amy E

    Lovely and uplifting insights, thank you Mia.

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  • Laura
  • Linsey

    Thanks Sarah. I live in Canberra. I was recommended Dr Soji Swaraj in Sydney so I’m booked in with him at the end of next month. Do you know of him and whether he is any good?

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    Rebecca Reply:

    I’m in Canberra. Dr Jane Taylor (Gordon medical clinic) is a gp who specialises in hormonal issues only. She is very open to trying different things too. I have Hashi’s and Adrenal fatigue and she is my main doctor. She uses the compounding pharmacy at Ainslie for some of my meds. Hope that helps a bit.

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  • Genevieve

    Hi Emily,

    I felt compelled to chime in here. Have you tried high dose ascorbic acid or betaine hydrochloride with pepsin at the beginning of meals (especially protein meals)? Could it be that your stomach acid levels are actually too low (iodine deficiency can contribute to this)? I realise you’ve probably already been down this path, but since you didn’t mention it, I thought I would suggest it. Good luck!

    Here’s a link that might interest you: http://drmyhill.co.uk/wiki/Hypochlorhydria_-_lack_of_stomach_acid_-_can_cause_lots_of_problems

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  • cat

    thank you thank you thank you everyone for the beginning of my acceptance to having an autoimunune disease. Just admitting that has changed my 50 – 80% to 100%. I can stop fighting and hating myself for feeling this way no matter what diet or how much exercise or sleep I get and accept it. I was diagnosed with sarcordosis 10 years ago which is an AI disease that primarily affects the lungs and eyes. So when trying to work out why I feel so crap all the time, drs would tell me no its only supposed to affect my lungs and eyes. So after many tests for everything under the sun as you have all experienced, I came to the conclusion that I must be depressed, unmotivated, lazy, useless, stupid, dumb forgetful unorganised, stressed………I’ll stop there!
    Time to accept Im not alone, I am “normal”, stop pushing myself and enjoy 80%
    Thank you Sarah your informations has been ……..I cant think of a fantastic word to write!
    Fantastic!
    thank you again xx

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  • Erin

    I just thought I would add, if you have ongoing reactions to different foods long term, it is worth going to an allergy /immunology specialist for testing so you can rule these things in/out for good. Things like anaphylaxis /urticaria can look like allergies but actually be treatable disorders like mast cell disfunction that mimic other ai diseases.
    Also I have finally admiited to myself that even if I eat/sleep/exercise perfectly, my surrounds and emotions will still affect my health big time. Facing And working on your emotional issues is just as important as quitting sugar, booze, bakery etc If not more.

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  • Rachel

    Hi Sarah,
    I’m not sure why exactly, but felt compelled to share a realisation I had this morning. I got on the bus to work the other morning (in the UK, although I am an Aussie and just moved here), my knee hurt, the sky was grey and I felt like there was too much struggle (yep, one of those days!). Then a very smelly man got on board. He was more than just a bit smelly! Some ladies were wondering where Lloyd’s bank was and he answered them and said he could show them.. Then, in typical British humour, he said “why, are you female bank robbers? Is this your getaway bus?”. And despite the smell and the gloom a whole bus load of people chuckled to themselves. In a kind of “what a crazy place this world is” type solidarity. I think I realised then and there that the 80% is far more worth the focus than the missing 20.
    It’s hard to break through that sometimes, but acceptance certainly helps!
    Thanks again for your beautiful words.
    Rachel

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  • Anthony

    This is all good stuff Sarah. But for me, I couldn’t settle for 80%, but that’s just me. I meditate till the cows come home, tinker with my diet, looking for that edge.

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  • Heather Bond

    Haha fancy seeing you here Israel such a small world!

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  • Cathy F

    I have Graves Disease (and a host of other complications) and have had my thyroid removed, which I am still in two minds about, as it has NOT been a “quick fix” as endo and surgeon predicted. A friend sent me the following youtube clip on IODINE – which both doctors thoroughly endorsed AVOIDING. It is fascinating – well worth a listen to. Has anyone out there tried this???????

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeDN-lJl7ho&feature=player_detailpage

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  • Naomi Lee

    Wow – it’s really all about perspective isn’t it?

    A few years ago, my Chi Gong master and TCM practioner told me I finally had reached about 80% energy levels of ‘normal’ people and I felt triumphant!

    Yes – that was enough energy to do normal things like work, travel and my greatest hope – have a baby.

    And SO much better than where I was at 15 years ago with a ‘chronic-fatigue’ like illness that made me feel ashamed, alone and desperately fearful about how I was ever going to support myself through life, let alone enjoy it. (If only the internet was around then I may have been able to get some answers or at least a way forward.).

    My reality is I can only work part-time, and if I travel I need to be mindful of how draining it is (and book out a day at the the destination to just rest quietly in a comfortable hotel before I go adventuring) and having the baby – well I managed that too – but took longer off work than others, as I needed the time to recover- I’m only going to have one child as that’s all my body can manage, and yes, it sent my thyroid wonky – but that’s slowly getting better too (and have had to be very strict with myself about practising self-love when I look in the mirror and see all that extra baby weight that the sluggish thyroid has glued onto me).

    It’s taken me a long time to move away from my perfectionist ways and accept my life for what it is – but now I can at least enjoy what I’ve got – and I wish the same for you!

    Thank you again for being brave and sharing – it’s heart-warming for those of us who have felt lonely and sad in ‘shadowy’ illness.

    Naomi

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  • Robyn

    Hi Sarah,
    You have a great blog! And, I love all of the comments above. My takeaway message from what has been said is that we should accept for the moment – that we are not feeling the best – because of Hashimotoes Disease. But, I agree with Anthony that we should not give up on getting better, and accepting only living life to 80 percent of our capacity. We can keep sharing ideas and tips through your blog like – the value of meditation, the value of having a good diet, the value of getting at least eight hours sleep a night, the value of not having a high stress job, the value of creating a good community of support people who understand where you are at.

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  • Emily

    Hi Sarah. I still get cross at the endo’s that say that…. From a family of people that all have different AI’s (mine is hashimoto’s, my brother Graves, my mum and aunties various forms of arthritis and thyroid AI), I still don’t understand why more research isn’t been done in investigating the cause rather than treating symptoms until we get to 80%… Let’s hope our children have answers.

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  • Emily

    And in saying that, my niece was born with an under active thyroid and her mum is the only one of my siblings that doesn’t have an AI (yet), so the cause can’t be all lifestyle… Acceptance will help us, but not my newborn niece.

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  • Peter Bilton

    Your article resonates so much and it brought tears when I read, “In more dramatic moments I’ve wondered if it’s worth living if I can’t get back to normal, if I keep failing and lapsing.” In my moments of despair when I am not able to function even at 20%, I have the same thoughts, my mojo, my dignity, my confidence all suffers. The AI expresses itself as Ulcerative Colitis and AI Hepatitis in the liver. I’m throwing all my limited resources at healing my body nutritionally, emotionally, physically, spiritually. I’m happy at this stage to be 60% and working towards 80%. Underneath, with no financial security, I am scared about what the future holds. I am so grateful that the recent 12 month AI cycle has passed…i’ve gained 15kgs in the few months and life is much more rosy! I still haven’t fully accepted that there is no cure…If I do find the cure I’ll be sure to let you all know:o)

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  • bernadette

    I have had hashimotos for 7 years and since i started T3 on top of T4, went gluten free, dairy free, soy free, sugar free and taking LDN (low dose naltrexone) my life has improved a lot. i feel 90% better now.
    A lot of autoimmune illnesses start in the gut so start improving your immune system as after all hashimotos is your immune system that is not working and attacking your thyroid. it could attack any part of your body.

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  • Ree Little

    Monday and Thursday, just have one meal on those days, to curb appetite caloric drinks ok, eg milo or whatever / tea / coffee (wilks) just hot water and milk. I dont count calories, just eat to my appetite. I have noticed with weight loss I need to eat around 1200 calories a day, not the recommended 1800 calories. Very gentle exercise otherwise I get inflammation. Now that I’ve lost the weight I can move my body without it hurting so much. Yesterday I actually jogged! Yoga is also very good as it heats the whole body up, but I can’t do the fish, its meant to be good for my thyroid but makes me gag!
    It actually gives you clearer thought (the fasting) and you sleep really well. After a while you look forward to a fasting day because you know its ‘fixing you’. I would make those two days very quiet days with little or low activity because it is you chance to be healed, not more stressed out. Good luck Sue ;) Fasting for maximal fat loss, is a webinar on youtube that was really interesting as well.

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  • http://www.ii-thebeautygarden-ii.tumblr.com Tammi

    For months i have followed your insightful and refreshing view on living with chronic illness. I followed the IQS diet to a tee after years of trying to cure my own Lupus (SLE).
    After 12 years of struggling to find a new “normal” and get back to my best – i think even striving to be better than that (it’s been SO long since i knew what ‘my best’ should feel like), i also came to the same acceptance that some days will be wonderful and others not so great. Every few months i get antsy and need a new remedy, a new swag of herbs, vitamins and anything else that will help me to feel bright and sparkley again… yet to no avail. At the end of the day, it really is about living your BEST life, not the ideal you hold in your head that might have been true at 18 but is no longer achievable at 32. Thank you Sarah, for bringing these feelings to light – sometimes I think that the plight of those with these ‘unseen’ or ‘silent’ illness is a lonely one – it’s comforting to know that we are not alone.. xx

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  • http://www.ii-thebeautygarden-ii.tumblr.com Tammi

    For months i have followed your insightful and refreshing view on living with chronic illness. I followed the IQS diet to a tee after years of trying to cure my own Lupus (SLE).
    After 12 years of struggling to find a new “normal” and get back to my best – i think even striving to be better than that (it’s been SO long since i knew what ‘my best’ should feel like), i also came to the same acceptance that some days will be wonderful and others not so great. Every few months i get antsy and need a new remedy, a new swag of herbs, vitamins and anything else that will help me to feel bright and sparkley again… yet to no avail. At the end of the day, it really is about living your BEST life, not the ideal you hold in your head that might have been true at 18 but is no longer achievable at 32. Thank you Sarah, for bringing these feelings to light – sometimes I think that the plight of those with these ‘unseen’ or ‘silent’ illness is a lonely one – it’s comforting to know that we are not alone.. xx

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  • elaine

    I read Meghan’s article after you recommended it and I’m so glad I spent that $6 to buy that issue. In April, I had a very bad case of orthostatic hypotension which I believe it related to adrenal fatigue/Hashimoto’s. After missing two weeks of work in April because I couldn’t stand up or sit down without feeling lightheaded, I’ve been on a mission in order to find a “cure” for my Hashimoto’s. I”m “euthyroid” so none of the many doctors I’ve seen will prescribe me medication.

    I swear I’ve read every single website on Hashimoto’s and autoimmune diseases and tried so many different lifestyle changes Paleo Diet, Perfect Health Diet, AIP, TCM, yoga, meditation, and I only feel a little better than I did 6 months ago. Maybe I need more time, but I feel utterly exhausted and drained by being so focused on being “cured”. I’ve also scared myself silly by being worried about the potential infertility that I face because my husband and I are thinking of starting a family.

    I’ve also noticed that there’s been a real strain in my relationships with both my husbands and my friends and that generally I’m very unhappy. Not really because I have Hashimoto’s, but because I have Hashimoto’s and I cannot make myself better no matter what I do. I’m so worked up over this disease that I’m not actually living a life.

    Reading the comments on this post, I see a lot of us were in the same position. Thanks for making me realize that I’m more than just this disease and it should not define my life!

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  • http://lupeyloops.blogspot.com.au Jodiebodie

    Hi Kerrie,
    While I don’t believe that our emotional state alone can cause disease symptoms, I do agree with yourthat our emotions can certainly influence our health and it is an important element in tackling any health issue.
    Hypoadrenalism is one of my symptoms and I have often pondered the link between a very stressful life (beginning with a traumatic childhood) and my current condition.
    To put it simply, I wonder whether my adrenal glands don’t work properly nowadays because I used up a lifetime’s worth of stress hormones in just 35 years.
    I also believe in the body’s power to heal itself to the best of its ability and live in hope of improvement.
    You are lucky to have freed yourself from methotrexate et al. and I am glad you are feeling great.
    However it is important to acknowledge that when it comes to chronic illness, it is not always someone’s fault due to their emotional state. Nobody asks to have a chronic illness, and the best attitude in the world cannot cure a physical disease.
    While emotional states can precede the onset of disease, the inverse can also be true that an underlying condition can contribute to an emotional state which then exacerbates the disease process.
    I agree that working through emotions can help to enhance one’s quality of life, with or without illness.

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  • http://lupeyloops.blogspot.com.au Jodiebodie

    One day I sat down and considered the losses – there were so many and grief is so exhausting in itself – I appreciate your mention of this aspect of coping with chronic illness and autoimmune disease. Once I was able to recognise my grief response, I could work through that and feel better (emotionally) in the long term.

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  • Lisa

    I will do this Kerry – thank you. I have tried so many ways to contact the emotional baggage from where this may have started (hashimotos) but have never tried EFT.
    Many Thanks

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  • Maggie Dee

    Oh, how I relate to this, Fiona.

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  • Anjali B. Nelson

    Thank you thank you thank you. Honestly though, I’d be ridiculously grateful for 80%. I’ve been trying to accept 50-60% for the last few years.

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  • Kimberely

    I’m currently at 40-50%. I’d be exhilarated with 80%! Great article!

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  • Heather van Weerden

    Hi Sarah,
    I just found your blog today thanks to an instagram post by Sarah B on mynewroots. I have type 1 diabetes and have been living with it for 14 years now and I too can understand how it feels to be 80% as the norm. I think that I do let the disease control me sometimes, especially when I’m busy or stressed out or overwhelmed. I really appreciate your openess about living (and sometimes struggling) with an AI condition – sometimes I get frusterated and wonder how other people do it!
    Thanks so much,
    Heather

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  • Claire

    Hello Sarah and friends, My sister has just enlightened me to the Sarah Wilson Sugar Free life style after she was given the book for Christmas. I had a quick read and thought woo hoo a positive solution. I have diagnosed Lyme disease/ infection that I have been aggressively treating for 2 years with antibiotics and herbals. My systems needs more help and I need help with a diet lifestyle that is real! We are farmers and most of our produce comes off our property but our old style of cooking includes a lot of sugar in the form of jams, cakes and bread. I am excited to follow your blogs Sarah and will buy your book next time I take the long trip to Perth. Thank you x

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  • Sazette

    Being a medical professional I find myself telling at least one person a day that maybe 80% is all we can offer – at the moment. The drive of the medical research community is huge, even if it is for financial not always altruistic reasons. It is wonderful to make another person feel healthier and that is addictive! So don’t forget that someone out there is working 24/7 to help you with the other 20%. It may not come this year, but look at what we have learnt in the last 5! Look at what we can do now compared to 1995…. Which feels like 5 minutes ago. Also doctors would rather offer you no treatment than an untested treatment.

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  • Shelley

    Sarah thanks for your article. I do not suffer from Hashimoto’s but I do have an AI disorder (dry eye syndrome). I am wondering if you have any thoughts about the link between gluten and dairy with AI, also?

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    Tessy Reply:

    Isn’t dry eye an age/hormone related problem, much like needed reading glasses?

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  • Marie

    Yes, so true. I invested over ten yrs (and many thousands of dollars) looking for answers both in and outside the box until last year I got critically ill and doctors finally started looking at AI disorders. Allergy diseases had never really been ruled in or out because of the broad spectrum of my reactions and increasing inflammation issues. Turning point was when I was put on a medication to help one issue and it helped resolve my reactions and long standing inflammation sites. I’m still recovering from that episode and my docs are saying we’re not a lot further ahead but I’m better then I was. Im now in a process of trying to replace the steroids I’m on with others that are safer for the long term. Those who have tried know its a tough road. Those like Sarah and Joe Cross and many commenter have given me hope and motivation to keep on with diet and lifestyle changes even though some days I just think why bother.

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  • Kelly Pribyl

    I think living with 80% and being ok with it so my AI disease doesn’t become my life is the right thing to do. I get tired of focusing on it ALL the time. However, there’s a part of me that will never stop trying to feel “better”. I’ll still read, research, and ask questions. I just can’t give up that hope.

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  • Mia

    I guess That is the best way to describe it, “My new normal” of course we can’t all feel 18 again. That’s not normal. Just accept what you are today, and move on enjoying your new life. I get up every day tired, and then I think about my friend who is 35 and has been fighting cancer for 2 years now. She is happy, and she makes the best of her new normal. Then I stop thinking about how bad I may feel, and go on, enjoying my life in a different way now. No I won’t ever feel “FANTASTIC”, but I still am “normal.”

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  • Nicole

    Wow Meagan I truly understand your conclusion to all this and I respect your decision. For me I can’t accept this 30percent for myself. I lost my job at the hospital and I am on permanent disability since the age of 46 years old. I have searched high and low to feel better doctors, tests like MRI ‘s Cat scans, twenty ultrasounds, minor procedures and pills. And it’s getting worse. My dream is to feel good enough to enjoy daily activities without feeling like my gas tank is running on empty and so exhausted and in pain that I need to lie down. This is emotionally draining depressing and a hard way to go through the rest of my life. What I recently found out was this….it all started for me) with low iron called ferritin. Mine was at 11 and women should between 60 to 80. Iron supplements don’t work well and the highest reading I can get is 36. Remember if your ferritin or in other words iron level is under 60 you’re body cannot convert t3 to t4. Once Iron is difficient long enough, chances are there is a low thyroid disorder. Keep in mind the lab test might say normal and you have all the symptoms of hypothyroid. And after years of improper treatment for this (t4) synthroid or levothyroxin came Fibromyalgia for me. Your TSH normal levels the doctors keeps telling you about, despite still having all the symptoms mean nothing. In fact TSH levels do not let you know that your thyroid gland is in trouble. My hair was falling out I was exhausted, I was cold all the time and had inside shivers. I had body aches and pains, constipation, digestive problems depression and severe anxiety, insomnia! and I thought I was crazy when a doctor would say nothing is wrong! I learned more about all of this through endless hours of research and Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum from Thyroid Summit. I have been listening to his treatments for months and I have learned more now then from any other doctor in the ten years it took to become this ill. These illnesses can be helped and you can feel a whole lot better. But finding a doctor that follows his protocol is difficult especially in Canada. An endocrinologist just doesn’t have the knowledge about treated thyroid much less your MD.If you can find an endo who will do a complete thyroid panel, test T4and T3 and look for thyroid antibodies despite your normal tests hats off to you! But I have not been able to. Desiccated Thyroid has t3 and t4 what your body needs and the dosage depends on how you feel not what the lab tests read. Look for Top Thyroid doctors in Canada , or Holistic Doctors who have experience in treating thyroid illness when the tests say you’re in the normal range so you must be crazy! I heard that a lot! Thyroid Mom also is a great website! I continue to research because I owe it to my myself and my adopted 6 year old boy who needs a mom that’s not bedridden most of the week! My heart goes out to all who suffer and my point was to share important information and give you hope on autoimmune illnesses. Brightest Blessings to all and good health!

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  • Maggie

    I have AI issues – Hashimotos, endometriosis and interstitial cystitis. I detoxed a lot of bad stuff (lyme, heavy metals, viruses, etc. through various supplements), totally changed my diet – all organic veggies, lean protein, lots of good fat (coconut oil) and occasional fruit (carbs very rarely) – and incorporated supplements. I was only about 85% at that point and I still had flares. Once I incorporated Wobenzym and Buluoke (enzymes), and ashwaghanda for my thyroid, I was able to get to 95%. I am not in pain anymore. I still have immunilogic infertility – that is the most stubborn thing – which I am also working on. I believe that your body wants to heal itself and reach homeostasis, you just have to find a way to help it get there. I have hope that I will completely solve the puzzle and get there soon. In the meantime, I feel better than most non-AI people feel every day! Good luck to everyone!

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  • Davide Jones

    I’m short of words here, I don’t know what to say about what Dr Otue has done for my mom.My mom cancer was deathly,my mom was diagnosed with prostate cancer in Aug 2011 with a PSA reading of 4.2 and a Gleeson score of 6. I would like to do active surveillance but my mom was not totally comfortable with this approach. my mom was in the low risk area based on her old age.Am so grateful to Dr Otue.who heal my mom,now my mom is free and so happy, Please Dr Otue is a great man..contact him for any kind of help.just a few moment with these great man he cured my mom infection i want you to know that all hope is not lost until every thing is done if you also have these following infections contact these email otuetemple@gmail.com or cell number +2348162578705.
    HIV/aids
    typhoid fever
    gonorrhea
    lancer fever.
    epilepsy.
    lung cancer.

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  • Natalie

    Amen, Fiona, my feelings exactly!

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