Diet doesn’t cure disease. And it’s irresponsible to say otherwise.

Posted on March 13th, 2015

The past fortnight has seen two young women who’ve treated their chronic disease with very particular diets hit mainstream headlines. It’s been astonishing stuff.

xxx

Image via FoodWear

News of wellness blogger Jess Ainscough’s tragic death tore through the media two weeks ago. Jess had a rare cancer (epithelioid sarcoma) and after undergoing chemotherapy, had declined the only treatment her doctors could offer her (amputation of her arm at the shoulder blade), instead deciding to treat herself with the controversial Gerson Therapy. This therapy – when applied to cancer patients – is based on a fully plant-based diet and involves drinking one glass of fresh raw juice every hour for 13 hours and taking up to 5 coffee enemas a day.

Then this week The Australian newspaper did an expose of mega-blogger and cult Instagrammer Belle Gibson who has claimed to be healing her own brain cancer (and more recently, liver, uterus, spleen and blood cancers, too) via alternative therapies and a healthy diet. The report claimed there is no proof Belle has ever had any form of cancer. Belle apparently admits she may have been misdiagnosed and subsequent news stories reveal a history of unusual and contradictory claims of terminal illness (and identities).

I’m not going to wade in on the ins and outs of the various reports (except to say I’m left very concerned about Belle’s welfare, wherever the truth ends up landing).

There’s a bigger issue to chat about here and that’s the notion of an impressionable public being encouraged to believe food can fix chronic disease.

This has concerned me for some time. And, of course, I’ve had to look at my own role in the palaver (I have an auto-immune disease, quit sugar to try help manage my disease better, and things snowballed from there.) I’m acutely aware of the responsibility I have in sharing food and health information, and information about my own chronic disease, and I get deeply distressed when my message is deliberately (or otherwise) misconstrued in a dangerous (to the general public) way by irresponsible media outlets. These recent developments highlight the need for far more responsibility and professionalism.

Partly to this end I’m going to take this highly charged moment to lay things out nice and clearly:

  • Food is not medicine if you’re chronically sick. Chronic illness is rarely curable – it’s, at most, manageable, something I repeat whenever I discuss my journey with autoimmune disease. That said, good, real, unprocessed food is highly effective (actually, non-negotiable) when managing chronic illness.
  • Mainstream medicine should not be sidelined. It should be appreciated and incorporated where appropriate, case-by-case. Me, I’m very transparent about the fact I take bog-standard, commercially produced Thyroxin for my Hashimotos condition. It’s what works for me. That said, due to my good eating over the past four years, I’ve been able to manage my disease much better and have reduced the dosage of Thyroxin substantially, with supervision from a bog-standard endocrinologist.
  • Food can, however, help prevent disease. And so this is why I do what I do. I want to help as many people as possible maintain their wellness so they don’t go down the autoimmune hell-hole I did (and continue to traverse). There are countless studies that back this measured proposition.
  • And eating crappy processed food does lead to disease. There is countless evidence of this, too. Feel free to read this recent study here for starters.
  • Changing your diet should be a n=1, gentle experiment done with care and caution and while bearing in mind that no one diet fits all. I am very careful to emphasise at every turn that “I Quit Sugar”. That is, I gave it a go, based on evidence that was emerging. It worked for me. And now I share information that might help you do the same gentle experiment, should you want to try it out. It’s an invitation, with helpful hyperlinks.

And finally,

  • Ensure you do no harm. Or so goes the Latin-derived medical adage. Fine for me to invite others to try out a way of eating for size. But with that comes responsibility. And this is something I urge anyone in this sphere to take on. Fully. Once a business spawned from my own experiment, I set out to ensure what I was sharing was safe. That when folk came out the other end, bare minimum, they’re not worse off. To this end I researched every facet of my program and two years ago set about conducting a study with a team of scientists and doctors at Sydney University to confirm that cutting sugar out of your diet (for both eight weeks and longer) would not result in any health issues. Indeed our study showed this. Further, Dr Kieron Rooney, who led the study, says: “Yet-to-be-published results tell us that some markers of metabolic health improved, with a subset of beneficial changes persisting up to five months after completing the program. The full report is currently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal in 2015.”

 Take care, take responsibility. And for goodness’ sake, ignore the vapid, rabid media operators who insist on adding kerosene to the flames (of their own fire). Not the right time!

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  • Gaby

    Pete Evans needs to hear this.

    [Reply]

    Kristen Reply:

    Pete shares the same message Gaby, people with medical conditions should always work in conjunction with their medical professionals

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  • Lee

    I love you even more for writing this! Lee x

    [Reply]

    Cherie Reply:

    Ditto!

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    Sam Reply:

    absolutely

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  • Keely

    Beautifully put Sarah. I have also minimised my bog-standard thryoxine dose with good diet choices under the guidance of an amazingly supportive gp and endo. Thanks for broadening the discourse :)

    [Reply]

    Janine Beck Reply:

    My sister avoided thyroxine altogether by doing the Whole30 eating plan for 30 days (no grains, dairy, sugar, alcohol, pulses, processed foods). Doctor couldn’t believe the dramatic improvement in thyroid hormone levels, the drop in cholesterol or the increase of Vitamin D in just 30 days.

    [Reply]

    Elissa Reply:

    n=1

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    Celia Yurdelas Reply:

    And if anyone here reading n=1 doesn’t know what it means – you have no business claiming you’ve “done your research” on anything vaguely resembling evidence-based science.

    Jennifer34 Reply:

    Celia there is plenty of evidence-based medicine in many peer-reviewed science journals of in-vitro and in-vivo studies on curative properties of virtually every phytochemical that has been isolated from plants. Now if doctors choose to ignore it, that’s another issue all together.

    Rachel Kelly-Hall Reply:

    A thyroid condition can be totally nutritional. Other times the auto response has been triggered, and it’s very hard to switch off. Good on your sister with her eating plan, wonderful news for her.

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  • Jane

    I totally agree with you Sarah. I cannot live without 4 shots of insulin a day. Without it I would die. I also take Thyroxine for an Underactive Thyroid. However as much as this medication is a major part of my life, so too is eating the most nutritious food that will keep me as healthy as possible. I have eaten organically for over 20 years because I believe it is better for my health. What worries me more than anything with certain types of social media is the claim to be a “game changer.” It’s a word I am seeing too often. What game is being changed? Good nutrition for optimal health has been around for ever for those who are interested. It’s nothing new. This weeks events are sad on so many levels. Big lessons for many.

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  • Kelli

    A very responsible post Sarah!!! Sometimes people take things to literally!!!

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  • Janine Beck

    I totally agree, that taking an extreme dietary approach and ignoring western medical treatment is unfortunate and tragic in the case of this woman. The biggest missing piece in the whole conversation is the effect of mental and emotional health on the body. Your overall health is 50% how you think and 50% what you eat. Many many forms of emotional healing are being proven to have impacts on physical health (and we all know about the power of the Placebo). Check out Lissa Rankin on the subject. Also, many many amazing stories and techniques using FasterEFT.

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    Kirsty Reply:

    Jess did not “ignore” western medical treatment. She used both traditional and non traditional treatments. She was only on Gerson for 2 of her 8 years with cancer, and it helped to prolong her life and give her the quality of life she wanted. The biggest tragedy in this story is that people are judging her for the choices she made. She was well informed, and she chose her therapy based on the information at hand. She never preached that people follow her path. Like Sarah, she shared her journey in the hope that more people would live healthier lives.

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    Poster Reply:

    Actually it did not prolong her life. The average life expectancy of a 17-30 year old with epithelioid sarcoma who has surgical treatment is around 72%. Without surgical treatment, five year survival is around 35% and ten year around 33%. So her passing after 7 years is predicted. Read more on Science blogs by oncology surgeon Orac if you are interested. As for quality of life, she stated herself the first 2 years she was virtually housebound. Also she lived near the beach but couldn’t swim in it because gerson didn’t allow it, fun. For the last year of her life she stated she was nearly bed bound and bleeding continuously from a fungating wound in her armpit. So I wouldn’t say she had a very high quality of life. I have read a lot of comments on blogs regarding her passing and honestly people don’t have a problem with the fact she chose gerson. What they (and I) have a problem with is that she promoted it as a cure. Yes cure. Refer to Rosie Hilleman’s blog where she found at least 37 times Jess either said or implied she no longer had cancer. The problem is – how many people followed her lead thinking she had cured herself?

    [Reply]

    sir ketchup Reply:

    Orac is a nob

    Ebony Reply:

    I had the displeasure of stumbling across Orac’s blog and to say what he and his mob had to say about Jess Ainscliffi was heartless and arrogant would be an understatement.

    Kirsten Reply:

    Orac is an experienced oncologist and is the only person who’s opinion on Jess’ cancer I would listen to.

    C Quella Reply:

    Doctor’s don’t know everything and are quite stupid when it comes to nutrition. Many, many doctors discount nutrition completely.

    K Reply:

    Yes, as I posted above, I think there were people who believed that Jess had cured her cancer, after she wrote on Facebook that she had done so:

    Thanks so much guys! Dani, the book is about natural health and healing, living a Wellness Warrior lifestyle and how I cured my own cancer. I can’t wait until its done. x

    (from Rosalie Hilleman’s blog post ‘Transparency, Misquotes and False Conclusions’)

    Kirsten Reply:

    I whole heartedly agree. Well said.

    Kirsty Reply:

    I was referring to her decision not to have the amputation as the choice she made regarding her quality of life. As you’ve stated above, Jess was very open & transparent about her cancer and her healing journey. With it she had both highs and lows, but regardless, she chose that path and stood by her decisions.

    I’ve read Orac’s post and frankly, I don’t believe people can be defined by statistics.

    At those times I’m sure Jess believed she had been cured. But to imply that people would read a blog post and then decide they can be cured the same way is down right insulting. I think you need to give humans more credit.

    K Reply:

    “But to imply that people would read a blog post and then decide they can be cured the same way is down right insulting. I think you need to give humans more credit.”

    I don’t think it’s unrealistic to imagine a scenario where someone is very sick and desperate and then they read a story of a person being cured by alternative means and hope that they can achieve the same?

    There are a few people who admitted believing that Jess had cured her cancer using Gerson. Here are just a couple of comments left on Rosalie’s blog recently:

    Justine
    FEBRUARY 28, 2015 AT 3:30 PM
    “I thought she had cured herself naturally, her death came as a shock. I wasn’t impressed after she used her fame to take down a gorgeous cafe in Byron. So very sad, RIP Jess.”

    Hayley
    MARCH 4, 2015 AT 5:37 PM
    “I went VEGAN because of Jess. Because she spoke in interviews and on her blog that “Gerson healed her” and that “it worked for me.” Actually NO IT DID NOT.
    I was in TOTAL shock when I heard Jess passed. I completely believed her lies that she was cancer-free.”

    Alice
    MARCH 4, 2015 AT 7:32 AM
    “Good to hear another perspective. I can understand where your coming from to an extent.
    But personally, I believed she had “cured” herself by what she chose to show us..”

    Ceejay
    MARCH 1, 2015 AT 4:37 AM
    “When I found out she died on Instagram, I immediately asked the question “how did she die, because surely it wasn’t cancer, because she was cured”.. I am sure many people felt the same way. We believed in the cures of Gerson based on Jessica’s information and testimonies.”

    Nicole Reply:

    Kirsty, Jess Ainscough wasn’t very open & transparent about her cancer at all. When questioned by people about her wounds that did not look right and looked like they were fungating, she said it was lymphedema due to all the flying she had been doing. I agree with you, she chose her path and stood by it, I respect her for that too. But with a very large following of people (and a lot of these people cancer sufferers themselves) from all over the world it was dangerous advice she was speaking out about when it clearly was not working for her. Her cancer progressed as expected as stated by Poster above-I feel sorry she got so fooled by the Gerson Therapy. I was the same as some have said above, when I heard she died, my jaw dropped, literally. I couldn’t believe it either.

    believer Reply:

    don’t be so negative about Gerson therapy until you have read the book

    misconceptions Reply:

    I have read it, and watched 2 people die using it.

    Lynda Reply:

    I think differently and disagree Jess was promoting it as a cure. I believe Jess promoted finding out what works for each person as we are all individuals. In that sense she was an explorer and shared her journey with the community. We can get fixated around this ‘cure’ language and gerson but I believe Jess’ underlying message in this regard was one of whole foods, encouraging a questioning mindset in becoming more educated regarding food choices, impact of this on our health, environment and animals and to become more aware of the food industry in general. Quality of life is an individual thing and means different things to different people.It is also about about perception and it is my belief Jess thrived despite having cancer. She left this physical world still very much living and thriving, holding on to hope, being open minded, being in the best mental space, giving her body and mind the best nutrition. Jess did everything within her power and in my mind left no stone unturned to give her self every opportunity and chance. In my view one can do no more. She was also very aware and of her responsibility to readers and did not take this lightly. Along the way she grew and shared these insights with readers as one would expect.

    Janine Beck Reply:

    Kirsty, please accept my apology, as I do not know enough about this story to comment in reference to Jess and how she handled her treatment (I only read Sarah’s post), and it sounds like she was wise to embrace many avenues for her healing. I’m sorry she’s gone. I do stand by the rest of my comment, as a general observation. The idea of someone addressing their health in an “un-western-medicine” manner brings up so much stuff for people, and it sounds as though much of this has been blown out of proportion. I wish for a world where we can embrace many forms of healing and that the underlying premise is that we each have an innate healing intelligence that responds to many different things.

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    Kirsty Reply:

    That was very beautifully said, and I definitely agree with you!

    Lynda Reply:

    Kirsty – great clarification on the essence of what Jess and the community she built a conversation about was about living healthier lives. Jess was so much about eating whole food, integrity, knowing yourself, valuing yourself and questioning and learning more about food choices and the impact this can have on our health, environment and animals. She was a great champion and leader in this regard and will be sorely missed. Her legacy is strong and will continue to impact. I strongly believe she helped plant seeds and these seeds and messages will carry. I also think its a timely reminder to be conscious of what we read in the media as there is so much taken out of context that can then become a witch hunt and the essence of the persons message is just lost. I totally agree with Sarah regarding Belle there is a girl behind all of this who’s welfare we all need to consider in how we engage in social media.

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  • YXZ

    i agree with 90% of this, except i feel like you misrepresented jess ainscough – she wasn’t only offered one treatment – they also offered chemotherapy and she did undertake chemo for her arm. her amputation was not guaranteed to be a cure either, just another way to prolong her life.

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  • Joel

    Very disappointed to see you take this stance Sarah. You should know better than to make blanket statements like this, which in my view is just as irresponsible. It’s great that you’ve personally found a balance between diet and medicine for your ailments, but different things work for different people. I’ve seen people remiss cancer with diet and natural therapies, just as I’ve also seen friends unfortunately pass away after discovering diet changes too late. Things in life are rarely as black and white as your headline.

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    Erin Reply:

    My interpretation of what Sarah is saying, is that it’s *not* black and white… That both diet and medicine/treatment play important roles in the very broad domain of health, well-being and illness.

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Hi Joel, totally accept your point. I wrote this post as someone whom others turn to for advice and direction. Thus, I’m flagging that conventional medicine can’t be discounted.

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    Daniel L Reply:

    Joel, “De te fabula naratur” Please read this post again.

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  • http://www.smaggle.com Smaggle

    I totally agree. I was very anti-the Whole Panty even before the events of the previous week and lots of people questioned me about my non-support of Belle Gibson, saying that I advocate healthy living and I support programs such as I Quit Sugar. I believe that many health problems start in people’s kitchen cupbooards and that health improvement can be acheived through diet but making money from people who have terminal illnesses and are very vulnerable is morally corrupt. There is no cure for cancer and it should be illegal to sell one.

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  • Nic

    Congratulations on a responsible and balanced article. So nice to read sense from someone!

    [Reply]

  • pixiedust8

    Thank you for this. While I agree that diet can definitely help cure an illness, the new “blame the cancer victim for doing something wrong” attitude drives me crazy. When there’s an internet story on someone with cancer, someone always comments that they wouldn’t have cancer (or would be cured) if they just “ate right.” It’s infuriating.

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  • Liv

    Great piece Sarah!

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  • Veronica

    You might want to consider also opening a discussion for spontaneous remission. It is not only possible but many thousands of cases are recorded on scientific record. I had metastatic breast cancer and spinal cancer 11 years ago and had the opportunity to experience spontaneous remission of the metastatic cancer (that standard medicine would say was incurable). 6 weeks later I was pregnant. Unless you are dead, there is always hope. See Anita Morjani’s work on this too. It is dangerous to make blanket statements about health in any forum. We are creative and amazing beings and are able to access a wider experience of health and wellness than many believe is possible. I do not come from any religious or food based dogma and do not preach a solution of my own to others based on my experience – although I am fully conscious of the power of letting go of stress from the nervous system and therefore allowing the immune system to kick up a gear. I am highly conscious about what I put into my body, my mind and my heart. My focus is presence, love and compassion and it works for me. Love and peace and love your raw truth and courage Sarah – you are an inspirational Lioness! Veronica Farmer

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Totally open to hearing and learning about it and I know it happens. Life is incredible. But as a health advocate I have to be careful what I present. I totally know you get what I mean!

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    RJ Reply:

    I don’t support your post Sarah. You don’t have to present anything here. It is none of yours – or anyone elses’ business what these women chose to do. ‘But others are follwing them…’. Then it’s their friggin choice. You and no other, are saviour to them as it their choice alone to decipher how to progress on their journey. Your post is written as factual. How the hell would you know?!!!!!

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    Jac Reply:

    It is everyones business as they both made a substantial living promoting their “cures” on false information.

    amanda Reply:

    Where Veronica – where is it in the scientific record? Where is the truth of your ‘claim’? Prove it.

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    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    Great point Doctors just push aside all of the cases considered Miracles (which are many) then there is placebo and nocebo which have dramatic effect. I would love to know more about your journey. Perhaps you could share with me?
    I take a multifaceted approach physical, mental, emotional, stress management, spiritual etc. If your open to sharing Tyler@consciouslifestyler.com.
    Cheers :)

    [Reply]

    Danielle Reply:

    Love your work Tyler!

    I went down an “unconventional” path to heal my body and although I haven’t had any invasive medical tests to prove that I am ‘cancer-free’ I have never been healthier!

    I believe the mind, spirit, emotional side is as important, if not more so than diet itself. After all, if this is imbalanced, your physical system will be as a result.

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    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    Generally Danielle I agree. And good to hear you are doing things the way you choose :) although most people see everything I do as being physical based with nutrition, cleansing (fasting) exercise, breathing, hydration etc.

    When people become clients of mine they find out very quickly that I have a massive emphasis on mental and emotional as well. Clearing out limiting beliefs and emotional traumas are paramount in my opinion and also looking at your relationships and mission in life can be key factors. Many times I think people get sick to get them back into alignment with what they really want in this life. It’s DEFINATLEY a multifaceted approach that sometimes requires medical intervention as well.

  • Tanya

    I’m feeling uncomfortable after reading this. It just doesn’t sit well. I had much respect for Jess Ainscough, as I do for Belle Gibson and you too Sarah, and the reason is because you are all strong women walking YOUR path. As we all should. Let’s celebrate that. Let’s encourage everyone to trust themselves and their decisions. Then they won’t be at as much risk of being influenced, but open enough to observe, adapt what resonates and feel free to make individual decisions based on their divine intuition.

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    K Reply:

    Being strong is good, but honesty and integrity are important too. Particularly if you admit that you are helping others dump conventional treatment for things like depression and cancer and “leading them down natural therapy”(sic).

    The Whole Pantry claimed on Monday that there was “absolutely no basis” to reports that Ms Gibson had helped people dump conventional medicine to treat cancer.

    But in a social media post that has since been removed Ms Gibson said: “I gave up on conventional treatment when it was making my cancer more aggressive and started treating myself naturally. I have countless times helped others do the same, along with leading them down natural therapy for everything from fertility, depression, bone damage and other types of cancer.”

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    Carly-Jay Metcalfe Reply:

    Except Belle Gibson never had cancer. Ever.

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  • Ella

    I am so glad you posted this Sarah. In your defence, you will often reinforce that these are your personal experiences and specific things you have done have worked for you but may not necessarily work for everyone. You also, unlike others, do not just portray your health as now being perfect (complete with heavily filtered images !). As someone who regularly reads your blog, I also note that you do not seem to have a blanket dismissal of conventional medicine which is what many of these “health bloggers” seem to do which can make many people feel like they are weak or incapable if they take prescription medications. I think that balance is the key here and I am so glad that you have addressed the issue. Unfortunately I think the whole Wellness Warrior and Belle Gibson issue will make people doubt all alternative health related bloggers (many of whom have little if any medical training) which is a shame as some of them do have a positive contribution to make but maybe not necessarily in the way they have previously wished ….

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Thanks Ella.

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  • Leanne McAlister

    I’m not that comfortable reading this article either. I have recently used Turmeric mix to cure a horse of very large sarcoid cancer when vets could offer no help and the “food” and “spice” did work. She has been sarcoid cancer free now for over a year. There are many instances where diet can work. There are many stories for human cancer being cured on sites of turmeric interest. Of course consult medical as I always do and try both, and also remove yourself from any stressful situations in your life where you can to heal yourself when sick.

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    I think we’re on exactly the same page!

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  • Rhian

    I love this! and I love that you research everything, and that you work with all sorts of health professionals to deliver factual, inspiring and genuine content! #unite4health

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  • Krysten Ioannides

    I appreciate this article sooooo much!
    I get incredibly frustrated when ppl claim ‘lemon and honey’ cures everything (that’s an exaggeration, but you get my point).
    Another point worth making is that doing your best to ensure good health is not a guarantee.
    We were eating mostly organic, refined sugar free and grain free when my husband got bowel cancer at age 35!! (no smoking and minimal alcohol too)
    We were gobsmacked to say the least.
    Peter Mac are still doing test on his tumour. They’re keeping it indefinitely alive outside of his body which is both awesome and creepy.
    So far there are no conclusive tests to say what category this cancer falls into and therefore why he landed it in the first place.
    Yes, do your best to protect your health – just don’t put ‘faith’ in it.
    People get almost religious about their feelings toward health and disease prevention. I hope these ones never get their foundations shaken the way we did, but I also hope they learn to keep quiet when they are NOT experts on serious health conditions.
    I’ve nearly left FB many times from frustration over what pops up in my news feed – “this is bad, that is bad, this causes cancer, this cures cancer”.
    If you don’t know for sure (which nearly no one sharing these articles does), then stop trying to influence others.
    We still eat amazing and healthy food btw, but because we want to – not because we think it ensures good health.

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    K Reply:

    Another point worth making is that doing your best to ensure good health is not a guarantee.

    Yes, I agree with this.

    There’s a book I’ve been meaning to read ‘The Cancer Chronicles’, by science writer George Johnson which discusses this. From a review of the book:


    Cancer is often described as an environmental illness, and so we blame our bad decisions, modern life, pollutants and poor diet. However, for a scientist, the term environment refers to any and all external factors, which can be so oblique and depend upon so many chance events that cancer is, ultimately, a matter of bad luck. Johnson ruthlessly debunks popular ideas, combing through the data to show there are very few unambiguous carcinogens: radiation, cigarettes and obesity are pretty much the entire list, and even these are not sure-fire causes.

    There is a base level to the number of incidences of cancer in the world and there always has been, argues Johnson.

    Cancer figures may spike at times under the influence of specific carcinogens, yet the underlying trend remains steady. Cancer is always with us and always will be…Cancer, Johnson argues, is a side-effect or trade-off with the advantages offered by the autonomy of our cells: as long as cells have the power to divide and proliferate, passing on new traits as they go, the path is open for cancerous mutations.

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    Samantha Reply:

    “People get almost religious about their feelings toward health”. Spot-on, to me there’s almost something cult-like about it. The Cult of Wellness and Holistic Therapies!

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  • Lisa (Yrlocalmarkets)

    I tend to agree with you Sarah. Others may have raised this issue (I haven’t read all the comments) but I am fascinated by Dr Terry Wahls account of curing her MS (or at least reversing it to a point where she can now walk, ride horses, bike ride and function normally) with a RADICAL change in diet. I think her story is particularly fascinating because she is a medical doctor who researched her condition so thoroughly because the slew of drugs wasn’t really stopping the progression of her disease. She started first with supplements but found that food actually worked better. I do respect her because of her training and commitment to research. She seems to be pretty straight-up, responsible and as a medical doctor, trying to help those in the same situation as herself.

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    Lisa (Yrlocalmarkets) Reply:

    I mean by the above that I agree that with you that diet shouldn’t be touted as a “cure-all” for chronic disease – but at the same time I’m fascinated by Dr Wahls’ story. I should have been a little clearer!

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    gotcha!

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    lloydscan Reply:

    Dr Wahls story is indeed very interesting as someone v close to me has MS. What I told them is she wasn’t just focusing on diet, but other therapies as well. Sometimes people focus on one thing ala diet without considering other factors. It wasnt diet alone.

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    Janine Beck Reply:

    Yes, it’s easy to hone in on the one thing you want to see that worked, when in fact, it was a whole range of things, not just in how the sickness came about, but what works in those people who healed it.

    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Terry is the first to acknowledge she manages her disease with food. I’ve spoken to her direct. But, yes, some get amazing results… the point is we have to be careful not to say everyone will get them.

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    Janine Beck Reply:

    She also talked about meditation (and reducing stress) as a very big factor in her healing process. This is HUGELY important.

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  • http://www.flourishing-wellness.com Cynthia Taylor

    Thank god for you and your no BS ways Sarah Wilson. I am, like so many, completely dumbfounded by what’s been uncovered in relation to Belle Gibson. Ultimately, you need to find what works for you. Here’s to more authenticity and transparency, regardless of your stance.

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  • Glen Nagy

    Would you say the ketogenic diet can cure epilepsy in some patients? For some patients seizures stop when they go on the diet. They stay on the diet for an average of two years then they can go off the diet and the seizures never return. This has been used since the 1920’s and there are patients that have been seizure free for decades after using the diet. I would call that a cure.

    [Reply]

    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    I’ve also worked with epileptics with fasting (ketogenic) and they get off meds and can follow a healthy plant based diet afterward typically moving forward. So there are multiple approaches. So much more to learn as well.

    [Reply]

    Kirsten Reply:

    You are right Glen, the ketogenic diet has been used to reduce seizure activity in people with epilepsy. Here’s the distinction between ‘diet’ generally and the ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet was the medical treatment for some seizure disorders. It was supported by sound science, that is, evidence-based. In this particular case, the ketogenic diet was scientifically shown to reduce the primary symptoms (ie seizures) in some people with epilepsy. However, while a ‘healthy’ diet can make us feel and function optimally, unless it is scientifically proven to reduce the primary symptoms of a disease, it ain’t medicine.

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  • Louise

    Excellent article Sarah. I worked in the weight loss industry for ten years and offer people the following comments (1) Not everything works for everyone – find what works for you (2) Everything in moderation – just work out what moderation is for your body. We are humans and we tend to follow the crowd when something appears to have success but at the end of the day it’s just finding what works for you and what you can live with long term.

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  • Ros

    Thank you Sarah, I totally agree. How many times do we hear someone has “cured” their disease and you can read all about it if you buy their book? I agree that changing diet helps and it has helped my hashis, however my thyroid no longer produces any hormone and I have to take T3 medication to survive. I know this, so why do I feel like a failure for having to take medication?

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  • Boo

    Great article, agree with everything though would comment that there is one chronic illness where food is the only medicine and the cure and that is anorexia.

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  • Naomi

    Controversy sells. Ruffle a few feathers and get people talking about you (regardless of whether it’s positive or negative), and you get the comments, followers and exposure that promotes your name and your brand. Some may say that’s smart marketing and, if that’s how you roll – good for you!
    What I do have a problem with is the fear-mongering and negativity that is flooding social media and the internet right now surrounding what people are eating and individual choices as to treatment for illness.
    What I know to be true from my own personal experience and the experiences of my clients is that – no matter how well you eat or how efficient your exercise program is – if you come at it from a place of fear, you are negating the goodness and healing that is naturally available to you.
    Your brain can not tell the difference between immediate physical danger and emotional danger. When your brain suspects danger (in this case as a result of your fear based thoughts around food), your body switches off its ability to go into healing mode so that you can either run, fight or freeze. For short periods of time, this isn’t an issue but over a longer period, you may end up with chronic illness as a result of hormonal imbalances such as rises in cortisol.
    There is no doubt that food is vital to your wellbeing. But even more vital is your capacity to be at peace with the choices that you make. Self love, compassion and acceptance are the first step in any wellness journey. Then take what resonates with you from any ‘food guru’ and leave what doesn’t behind.

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    Ebony Reply:

    Well said Naomi!!

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    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    Well said and if it wasn’t for her post we wouldn’t be having this conversation. I appreciate that people bring up these points. I know I have gained a bit of clarity myself from reading her article and appreciate looking at different peoples perspectives.

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    Aaron Hill Reply:

    That’s a lie Tyler. I engaged you in an open discussion recently on one of your facebook posts. You accused me of being a “Big Pharma Shill” and asked me where I was getting paid. Then you attacked my character on the post and followed a deletion of every comment I had made. I challenged you openly to provide one case where your method healed someone of cancer by providing their full medical record for independent evaluation by a mutually agreed third-party. You were not willing to provide this and decided instead to discredit my character rather than engaging in open rational debate. If anyone wants to know where Tyler comes from, do a search for his father, Don Tolman, and look deep into the money making scams and chequered history. These people are pathological liars that believe their own rhetoric and prey on the weak and vulnerable. Many cancer patients have died painful fast deaths at high $$$’s as a result of Tyler’s lies. This man, and his team, cannot tolerate being challenged by anyone with a strong rational mind and intellect. Their only defence is, “you must be a big pharma conspiracy $shill” without providing any evidence whatsoever. No evidence seems to be the way they operate. Only anecdotes that can’t be independently and rigorously verified. I’m calling you out Tyler. I see you for what you really are. A con artist that believes his own rock star status and lies.

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  • Daniel L

    Great article Sarah! Mainstream media is toxic and I hope that most of us learned how to live with it… I believe that everyone have the right to choose their own path to healing. Pressure from family and friends usually influence decision in what way to choose in many cases… Knowledge, open mindedness and persistence in the effort to overcome the issue start playing major role then…

    Harsh conventional treatments, early on in their diagnosis, can sometimes work, with all nasty side effects on the body.
    My mother survived cancer by accepting conventional therapy, but I influenced her heavily on natural way of overcoming these side effects and trying everything to change her food choices as soon as she ‘s been diagnosed… She altered her diet dramatically and quit sugar and processed food… That had immense positive effect on her in many ways. I thank You for your awesome blog and IQS that has great influence on me to strengthen my quench for inspiration about better life in general :-)

    There is no right or wrong. After all, it is only what we believe is right in our own minds, and that can lead us to find balance and inner peace.

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  • NutritionStudent

    ‘That said, good, real, unprocessed food is highly effective (actually, non-negotiable) when managing chronic illness’, please share the evidence for this claim :)

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    Kirsten Reply:

    Yup….and what is meant by ‘managing’ illness?

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    Leonie Reply:

    Reducing the severity of the symptoms while still acknowledging the underlying illness remains?

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    Kirsten Reply:

    So you mean palliative treatment. Not treating the disease, just easing the symptoms. Like, taking a Panadol for the headache caused by a brain tumor?

  • http://www.lipsnberries.com Nishu

    totally agree. In the end it all comes to common sense. How about we listen to our body and know its needs!

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  • Amy

    Well said, Sarah. A sensible and thoughtful post on a difficult topic. x

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  • Linda

    thank you – sorry that you had to write this around the recent sad circumstances – I also take medicine to deal with a chronic illness (it’s helped me so much!) – but also know the importance of foods & exercise in helping heal your body (seen an improvement there too).

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  • Carly Hicks

    Beautifully written Sarah. For someone that has an Autoimmune condition you’ve summed it up perfectly. xx

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  • Peela

    Its a shame the medical profession don’t live by “do no harm”. its a shame people think that what the allopathic medics do is necessarily going to cure, either- it often doesn’t. Especially chronic disease. Especially cancer. And, Jess did a LOT more than use food to try to cure her cancer. Everyone focuses on the food. Its one part of the journey. Be responsible for your own journey, that’s all. There is no answer. Its each individual’s journey. Don’t give your power away to anyone. Walk your own path with dignity, there is no “failure”, there is no getting it wrong, there is only learning.
    And be careful what your beliefs are, because you will be sure to live their reality.

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  • Tyler Tolman

    You are correct wholefoods do not cure anything. What they do is clean out the plaque, free radicals, alkalise the system and get the digestive system working properly again. Then the BODY heals itself.

    Chronic disease is from years of accumulated damage and can be reversed through lifestyle. Proven time and again by many people who finally wake up and get it. Medical means can only mask the symptoms or ease the pain of chronic disease. But ultimately add to the problem.

    There is plenty of research from the American Cancer Society and the institute of Cancer research that show wholefoods do actually contain components that prevent and even reverse inflammation, decongest the body allowing for the healing process to take place.

    We all know in our hearts the truth. Clean fresh fruits, vegetables, greens, seeds and roots have the power to support the proper functioning of the body. And eliminating the clogging foods and drinks that throw out system out of whack is the answer. Along with proper hydration, exercise, good relationships, passion, deep breathing and a positive outlook on life.

    Just observe super healthy people of all ages and long lived cultures free from most disease and you will see this time and again.

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    Sarah Wilson Reply:

    Yep, great perspective. For some, conventional medication is also required for the body to heal itself (though, conventional mediciine, sadly, can often be about masking symptoms).

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    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    I do need to give credit where it is due as well. Acute disease on the other hand is dealt with amazingly by Doctors and many of the treatments are necessary. It’s the education needed around the chronic disease that is seriously lacking(in my opinion) I do see where a dual approach is necessary in many cases and believe through experience that most chronic illness can be drastically turned around with the right information. Thanks for allowing me to share :)

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    Leanne Faulkner Reply:

    I think the key to separating truth from urban tales is in the science. Tyler and Sarah if you are going to spruik health with the food you eat I hope you can explain your theories from a macromolecular level rather than broad statements.

    In addition Tyler I have to say, given the message in Sarah’s post and the discussions had here on the comments list I was shocked to see your Facebook ad on my feed claiming to cure cancer via diet. How can that possibly be allowed?

    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    I would suggest re-reading the post (feel free to copy paste if you like)
    I make a true statement based in the facts. That people with aggressive Cancer have attended my program and after fasting for an extended length wih many protocols and lifestyle modification. They have found to be Cancer Free.

    I never said I cured anything.

    Leanne Faulkner Reply:

    Hi Tyler,
    Thanks for responding so quickly. Believe me, I don’t normally harass anyone, but the recent themes pertaining to Sarah’s post prompted me to question it all. In addition, I have just started doing molecular biology at university and that has really started to open my eyes to what is biologically possible within our bodies and what is not. I must say, I am far from expert – simply a student open to questioning everything now.

    Here is the extract from your Facebook ad:

    “I will be sharing tons of information on what my team and I have been
    achieving in the healing of cancer, lyme disease, diabetes, heart
    disease (high blood pressure and cholesterol), motor neurones,
    arthritis, thyroid conditions and more!”

    If that doesn’t read as a claim to cure cancer then I am obviously confused and I aplogise. Thanks.

    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    Does read differently than I thought it did. Will chat with my Marketing man. If you are into biology and transformation I highly recommend Dr Bruce Liptons work. Biology of belief or Spontanious Evolution. I have had amazing success with all the above but I know that it’s anecdotal evidence from a scientific perspective.

    Leanne Faulkner Reply:

    Thanks for the book recommendation. I’ll make sure I read it over the semester break. Have a lovely evening Tyler :)

    Monkeyfish Reply:

    He’s scamming you. Trust your education. Unfortunately the internet is full of these fools claiming that cancer can be cured if you just pay them enough. They prey on the weak, sick and desperate. Walk away!

    Aaron Hill Reply:

    Yes, Tyler is a con artist just like his father Don Tolman. He worked in the business with Dad for many years standing at the back of the concert hall conning people into buying weekend tickets to expensive seminars that achieve nothing. I challenged Tyler recently on one of his Facebook posts that appeared on MY FEED. He didn’t like it, accused me of being a “big pharma” shill and asked me who was paying me. No evidence was provided. Then he discredited my character and deleted all of my comments that asked for evidence behind his claims. The best he could do was cherry-pick a couple of Pubmed articles that suited his argument. But anything I responded with that involved presenting full medical records for any patient he has cured of cancer, to be independently judged by a mutually agreed third-party, was ignored, avoided or derided. Run, don’t walk from this man and make sure you hide your wallet. Con artist.

    Sandy Reply:

    Sarah it would be great if you met and interviewed Tyler Tolman as he has much value to add

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    Rach Reply:

    Love you Tyler Tolman. Always coming through with truthful and factual information. And the fact that you actually have people with chronic disease come to you and they heal speaks volumes, you know what you’re talking about!

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    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    It definitely helps that I had years to watch my fathers methods of helping people. And then when you see it yourself working time and again you really gain confidence in the bodies natural intelligence and how it becomes about supporting what the body is wanting. Thanks for your kind words. :)

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    Kirsten Reply:

    The major flaw in this argument is that cancer cells don’t regenerate as healthy cells. That’s what distinguishes them from healthy cells! Secondly, your logic relies on the fact that all illness is generated by environmental factors. What about genetic conditions and idiopathic disease? Eat well, lead a balanced life and you’ll certainly do no harm but the rest of your point is a stretch at best. If the body could completely regenerate in the manner you describe, we would all be 1000 years old!

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    Jane Hayes Reply:

    Pancreatic beta cells in a Type 1 Diabetic?

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    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    Yes. These can be corrected as well. I work with type 1’s adults and children and have seen massive improvement and many people reverse the condition completely. Watch 30 days to raw with Dr. Gabriel Cousins. He gets great results as well in type 2 and type 1. (Complete reversal)

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    Jane Hayes Reply:

    Dr Cousins has stopped accepting Type 1 patients. I have watched 30 days to raw but from memory they were Type 2 which can be reversed in many cases through diet and lifestyle. I am not aware of Type 1’s coming off insulin with the exception of newly diagnosed. LCHF is working very well for me but I am always wanting to learn. Thanks for reply.

    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    The black man on the doco was type 1 and took longer but eventually reversed it completely and no longer takes insulin. I still work with Type 1’s if you are interested. It’s not a quick and easy process. Either way I wish you the best.

    Jane Hayes Reply:

    Thanks Tyler. I am not familiar with your work (sorry) but I am always interested in learning and making an informed decision. Where are you based? I would like to learn more. However I think my body is more suited to LCHF rather than raw food lifestyle.

    Tyler Tolman Reply:

    I’m not a raw foodist. And I believe there are benefits to LCHF for specific reasons. But I also don’t think its healthy in the long run and believe you will discover this over time. If/when you do you will know where to find me. FB 😉 until then wish you the best.

    Jane Hayes Reply:

    Oh I don’t do Facebook but will continue to investigate and learn. Thanks

  • Tracy Howard

    I’m confused as to why people are uncomfortable with this or don’t agree or want evidence – did you read the article?! Sarah is all for conventional and so called non conventional ie diet/nutrition (this includes herbs & spices) Eating real unprocessed food gives your body the nutrition it needs to have an immune system that works that isn’t compromised or burdened by additives and chemicals. A healthy properly working immune system is crucial. This complements most conventional forms of treatment.
    A well written article that is balanced and helpful, thank you for writing and sharing this.

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    Cas Towers Reply:

    This is why I love you Sarah x

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    Guest Reply:

    Does anyone remember when Sarah dedicated a blog post to eating a chocolate croissant? Confused

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    Leonie Reply:

    The post was primarily about how she wasn’t being dogmatic about it, and about forgiving yourself when you make a decision that isn’t in line with what you normally try to achieve for yourself. It matches the post above perfectly to my mind, Guest.

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  • Anna

    This is so, so important Sarah! Whilst the Internet is a great place to learn and make connections, there’s no quality control over the information that is spread. It’s a blizzard out there. Sometimes the Internet gives people an excuse to abandon critical thinking. We see techno-colour photographs of smoothies, yoga poses, blazing sunsets and link the visual vibrancy to the practices touted by wellness figures (often self proclaimed) without really stopping to think. I hope your message doesn’t get smothered by the controversy, I really hope Belle is okay too

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  • Belle

    Worth noting that Jess always described herself as living with cancer, not cured of cancer

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    K Reply:

    (I think my last comment got eaten!)

    Belle, I thought so too, but there is a screenshot of Jess on Facebook saying the following:

    Thanks so much guys! Dani, the book is about natural health and healing, living a Wellness Warrior lifestyle and how I cured my own cancer. I can’t wait until its done. x

    It’s on Rosalie Hilleman’s blog post ‘Transparency, Misquotes and False Conclusions’

    I’m not being critical of Jess, but just wanted to show why some people may have misinterpreted her message.

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    Carly-Jay Metcalfe Reply:

    Not true. If you read Rosalie Hilleman’s blog, you’ll see irrefutable proof that Jess DID say that she had cured herself of cancer.

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    Nicole Reply:

    Belle, I hear what you’re saying, I have heard her say in a few interviews she was living with cancer, but she also said many many times and has been quoted in print she was ‘cured’-very confusing message.

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  • sallycinnamonau

    “Food is not medicine if you’re chronically sick” – Sarah are you joking? Of course food is medicine when you are chronically sick. Not the only medicine of course and not guaranteed to cure, but is certainly a form of medicine. Many cases of things like chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia and T2 diabetes are either reversed or very well managed with diet changes.

    That line doesn’t fit with your overall message (on this post and your program) at all!

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    Julie Reply:

    Medicine by it’s definition is to diagnose, treat and prevent disease. So, in a broad sense food is not medicine but it is certainly part of the solution especially for prevention. I think it would help to take Sarah’s comment of ‘food is not medicine if you’re chronically sick’ a little less literally and focus on the overall message here.

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  • Kelly

    Thanks for the post Sarah but could you repost the link for the study mentioned? It says the page can’t be found. Or alternately if you could tell me the name of the study and what journal it’s in I should be able to find it. Thank you :)

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    Kirsten Reply:

    The link leads to a blog that mentions one study that found that for people with MS, a very high sodium intake appeared to increase the severity of their disease. The actual journal article wasn’t there so I can’t comment on its quality. From there the author of the blog came to the conclusion that a junk food diet causes autoimmune diseases.

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  • Cosi

    Great post Sarah. You make the simple, but critical point that diet and food choices can manage and help prevent (certain) diseases and are critical to support good health…as opposed to ‘curing’ disease.

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  • Jenny

    “Rabid media operators” …*cough* mamamia… Who I see have, for possibly the first time ever, written a positive “article” on this post.

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  • Alice

    THANK YOU! These two cases really have brought a number of issues into the spotlight. I am a complete advocate for quality healthy food being one of the greatest preventative measures we can take against disease and ill health, and it is also tremendous in helping to manage these conditions. However, personally coming from a science position, I fear social media that was once a forum to positively promote healthy eating; has now taken it to the extreme of convinicing people to turn their backs on modern medicine and science like its the enemy. Modern medicine is increadible, and we have science to thank for so many dicoveries that help our world and society evolve. Healthy food, and good lifestyle practises should still be completley encouraged; but people need to know modern medicine and science is our ally when needed

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  • Guest

    Nothing new about sugar! Added selenium and iodine to the diet to strengthen the thyroid. What also worked for me was combining exercise with the right diet (no sugar, no dairy or red meat). Agree that food is only part of the road to curing or managing ones disease.

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  • Guest

    Nothing new about sugar! Added selenium and iodine to the diet to strengthen the thyroid. What also worked for me was combining exercise with the right diet (no sugar, no dairy or red meat). Agree that food is only part of the road to curing or managing ones disease. No thyroxin in my plan as it only tells the thyroid that it is no longer required to work…. some things never change with the medical profession! Now back to a normal life.

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  • Martin Hammelmann

    Nothing new about sugar! Added selenium and iodine to the diet to strengthen the thyroid. What also worked for me was combining exercise with the right diet (no sugar, no dairy or red meat). Agree that food is only part of the road to curing or managing ones disease. No thyroxin in my plan as it only tells the thyroid that it is no longer required to work. Now back to a normal life for the last 6 years.

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  • Kirsten

    That’s some fancy back pedalling you are doing there, Sarah Wilson. Did your PR manager suggest you make a statement distancing yourself from the other wellness goons (Ainscough, Gibson and Evans) before they turn the finger to you? Fact is, you repeatedly claim that diet manages your AI disease and make vague health claims regarding diet without supporting your assertions with solid evidence. You are just as big a part of the world of wellness blog misinformation as the others aforementioned. Your ideas are incredibly old hat, just ask the Pritikin pushing Julie Stafford (Taste of Life) who beat you to the punch decades ago. As an allied health practitioner with a real qualification, I cannot condone your message in any genuine health discussion.

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    Georgie Reply:

    Thank goodness this was said! I think there is lot of us thinking exactly the same thing. Classic PR 101 :)

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    Leonie Reply:

    What’s wrong about saying her AI disease is less symptomatic since she quit sugar? Sarah is always quick to point out that everything should be a n=1 experiment (i.e. try it out and see if it feels good for you), and has never claimed she is off medicines completely. The IQS message is that you are likely to feel better not eating large amounts of fructose, and that it’s worth giving a go for 8 weeks to see if you can tell the difference personally.

    Clarifying her position that food can be helpful to health (something an allied health practicioner presumably agrees with) but that traditional medicine shouldn’t be ignored when dealing with illness, and trying to spread the message with respect to all the health advice received across the internet and media, can only do good.

    PS. Whether the ideas are old hat or not is irrelevant, but it sure is snarky. Eating real food isn’t exactly a novel idea – ask your great grandparents – but it sure is one we seem to have forgotten about.

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    Monkeyfish Reply:

    What about the post where she told people to stop taking medication for mental illness and cure depression, autism etc with diet?

    It seems “healing your gut” hasn’t worked and the wellness bloggers have been forced to backpedal on their pseudoscience.

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  • Renee Bell

    Love this post, so well said!!!

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  • http://www.yinyangmother.com Kathy www.yinyangmother.com

    This is a very responsible and honest article on a very sensitive topic.

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  • Breakfast Criminals

    This needed to be brought up! Great points, Sarah. Thank you. All wellness bloggers have a responsibility, and this is a reminder all of us need to remember.

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    Jim Blake Reply:

    diet prevents disease

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  • Lara

    I was over weight and tried so many things. Different things work for different people and I was lucky enough to find one that worked for me. I lost 18 pounds in one month without much exercise and it’s been a life changer. I’m a little embarrased to post my before and after photos here but if anyone actually cares to hear what I’ve been doing then I’d be happy to help in any way. Just shoot me an email at secretosdelara@gmail.com and I’ll show you my before and after photos, and tell you about how things are going for me with the stuff I’ve tried. I wish someone would have helped me out when I was struggling to find a solution so if I can help you then it would make my day

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    Leonie Reply:

    Hey Sarah, I think you have yourself a little spammer here.

    If you click the name, this exact comment has been used on this Disqus account on many websites in the last few hours.

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  • http://thedetoxspecialist.com/blog Sandy Halliday

    It used to be that people who had already had chemo were not accepted onto the Gerson Therapy or advised against doing it because the chemo was so toxic and damaging. There’s nothing to stop them doing it of course and I guess it gave Jess a few extra years. It was her choice.

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    Celia Yurdelas Reply:

    Oh – you mean like her mother – she had no chemo, no radation – in fact not one BIT of evidence-based treatment – just Gerson – and surprise surprise the breast cancer advanced at the same rate as if it were untreated. You people are deluded. Making all kinds of excuses as to why it didn’t work. I’ll give you a hint – IT’S BECAUSE IT DOESN’T WORK.. Clearly most of her followers stayed wilfully ignorant after her final blog post pointedly stressed just how sick she was. Jess Ainscough would have to have written “I’m dying” on a rock and thrown it at you all – and even then you’d have ducked.

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    Carly-Jay Metcalfe Reply:

    I fully agree with you, Celia. Jess’s mother cancer was TOTALLY treatable, but she chose not to treat it. She probably ended up with fungating wounds, too.

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    misconceptions Reply:

    Jess had a slow growing cancer with approximately 50%, 10 year survival rate. So, unfortunately she did not add a few extra years.

    [Reply]

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  • http://www.thebeautyissue.com/ Julie | The Beauty Issue

    Great article Sarah and given your own experiences an important message. It is a vulnerable place to be when someone suffers chronic disease or cancer and it is great to see a person with influence as yourself showing the integrity required to approach health and healing in a balanced way.

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  • Anon

    First, if anyone followed Jess’s blog they would know that her cancer came back because she was in shock after her mother died, so that is the reason why Jess died, not because she refused to do what the doctors told her to do. Jess had a beautiful soul and was one of my idols.

    Second, I have serious and chronic health problems which are almost healed with natural medicine and made worse with conventional medicine. My health coach who is assisting me with healing my health problems naturally, has had cancer and has healed her cancer with only natural medicine, she rejected conventional medicine and is a very healthy person now. She had cancer many many years ago and she has maintained a healthy diet and lifestyle ever since healing her body with natural medicine.

    Third, when does chemicals and toxins heal anything – that is what conventional medicine is about people. Conventional medicine is a money making scheme. Wake up everyone and release what you are doing to your body.

    [Reply]

    Nicole Reply:

    Anon-‘her cancer came back because she was in shock after her mother died’. Her illness unfolded excatly as expected for this type of cancer .

    Sorry to hear about your serious and chronic health problems, and glad something is working for you-but anecdotal ‘evidence’ means nothing, nothing can be made from it.Same with your health coach, that’s just one person’s account, and the only way to know if what she was doing worked if you compared a group of people with same diagnosis doing what she did to a group not doing these things.

    [Reply]

    Anon Reply:

    Nicole, sorry but you are wrong about everything you have said and haven’t made sense in anything you have said either.

    My health coach in well-known in the natural medicine industry and has healed thousands of people with health problems from cancer to depression. I did my research on her business before signing up to one of her programs and believe this is so much better than destroying my body with conventional medicine, like my health coach and all of her clients have said about the medical industry. There doesn’t need to research done on the fact that natural medicine is the way to go.

    [Reply]

  • Sonja Gardiner

    How insensitive of you to only share part of Jess’ story. She thrived for many years with an incurable cancer. She lost her mum to breast cancer several months ago and she took a bad knock. It was from that point she deteriorated, and she agreed to undergo chemotherapy, perhaps to her detriment. I’m disgusted you’ve made a bad example of a very brave and inspiring young woman. And by the way, you are wrong. Food is our medicine.

    [Reply]

    Anon Reply:

    Well said Sonja!!!

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    Nicole Reply:

    Hi Sonja-the chemo she did was well before her mum was even diagnosed, and wasn’t this the only time she had chemo? This was the isolated limb perfusion she had two days before she was set to go into surgery for the amputation her medical team called her up about. From all her interviews and articles I have read, she didn’t have any other chemo, going the natural medicine route.
    She certainly lived her life to the fullest given her dire circumstances, and for this I trully admire the girl. But thriving, not sure about that. 2 years housebound, juicing on the hour, 5 enemas/day. I remember reading an interview where she said she just wished she could ‘finish a whole movie’ without any interruptions, or if she left the house she couldn’t be away longer than 45mins due to the juicing schedule she was on. Imagine this for 2 years. And then the final year with her ‘constant bleeding for 10 months’. Jesus, if that’s thriving..

    [Reply]

  • Lucy

    I would love to hear about the nutritional science qualification or thorough research reviews you have undertaken that enables you to confidently make such a sweeping generalization as ‘Food is not medicine if you’re chronically sick’.

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  • Martin Hammelmann

    Did not expect so many condescending comments from your post Sarah. Seems like most ppl think food is indeed a form of medicine. Maybe stick to your own personal situation on Hashimoto or autoimmune disease…. I find that this approach is a pretty safe bet when I am discussing thyroid cancer and Hashimoto disease. Love your work and how you have also turned a passion into a business. Unfortunately I cannot get any value from your book or product list that I do not already possess or can get cheaper elsewhere. Following your blog is of value to see what is still out there to be learnt from others. keep up the good work.

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  • http://www.savouringsimplicity.com/ EK Bradley

    I studied Ayurveda at a clinic in India. The Doctors there had countless patients ( the waiting room was totally full, all day long, with people coming from all over the country) that were successfully using the 5000 system of Ayurvedic medicine to treat anything from mild illness to diseases of all varieties. I’ve also seen friends and family use natural medicine and natural treatments to cause cancer to go into remission. Does alternative medicine work and have less side effects? ABSOLUTELY. It has been used in cultures throughout the world for thousands of years until Western medicine made it go almost underground after they launched witch hunts against natural doctors or healers. Dr. Schulze and Dr. Christopher are two herbalists that have been persecuted for using herbal medicine and a plant based diet to treat and cure patients. My point? Western medicine is a very, very profitable system that thrives by not having people question it. Does its treatments often work? They can. They can also kill people. Integrative medicine and uniting both stances on healing are welcome, but saying that diet can’t cure disease is flat out inaccurate.

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  • Suzanne Anderssen

    The point is that many people have lost the connection they had as children starting out on solid foods. My experience with my own child was to put real food on a plate in front of her, and let her choose what and how much she ate. She would self-regulate, and still does, somedays eating little, somedays eating loads. Her body tells her what she needs to eat, of course with guidance from us as parents, choosing to buy foods that support us and have only those foods in the house available. I watch what happens to her, as I do myself, when she eats certain foods, and if there’s a reaction such as a change to her emotions e.g. defiance, easily upset, tired, frustrated, or a sore tummy, etc, when these behaviours are not her usual playful self, then I backtrack and see what foods she ate that are clearly not sitting right for her.
    It is from a connection to our own bodies that is the driving force, not what society or scientists tells us how or what we need to eat, behind what we should eat.
    Read cookbooks, read food blogs and read Sarah Wilson’s blog for sure, there is much common sense information here. But at the end of the day, if you don’t like what she or anyone else has to say, then simply walk away and eat what you want. There is no need to have an opinion about it, it is not needed. Rather look and find what feels right for you and keep adjusting that, and you’ll find the diet for you and your body.

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  • ella

    I get really tired of people thinking a diet will “cure” my auto immune kidney issues (and other issues). I love that you exist because (I hope) it helps people understand. And certainly I think cleaning up our diet(s) and environment will help to prevent auto immune disease. But has anyone had a doctor tell them why, or how this has happened? I certainly havent! At the same time that I love this blogs content, the title of this blog puts me off because of its sense of finality. Disease(s) can be cured, my reactive arthritis completely dissapeared despite dire predictions from my rheumatologist. Not remission, gone for almost seven years now. Whatever I did feels like some kind of fluke, but it did happen. So I stay open minded, and even though I expect probably Ill be “managing” the rest of whats happening inside of me for some time more. I am open to all possibilities.

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  • karen

    The link to eating crappy processed food is not working.

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  • andri

    What a ridiculous claim. You’re a journalist– what makes you an authority on the matter? Where is your research to back this up? Diet has reversed tons of disease. For example Dr. Terry Wahls has largely reversed her MS through diet alone. Plenty of cancer survivors have opted out of chemo and gotten well with diet and lifestyle changes alone. Although risky and often irresponsible. But doesn’t negate the fact that for some disease it can be effective.

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  • BustedHalo

    I appreciate the message behind the article but the title itself is detrimental to those who might want to try. I cured my cancer, my daughter cured her Crohn’s, my sister cured her diabetes, and some other relatives cured themselves, with wholesome nutrition and smart eating. I have a granny who is 103 years young – lives off the land of the (organic) family farm. She never eats from anything outside of the farm foods. She grows her own herbal garden and has all kinds of fruit trees within reach. She has no ailments, doesn’t need eyeglasses to read, and still cooks up a storm for the family. She taught us all to eat for nutrition and to know what provides it. She reminds us that the science of nutrition, and immune systems, have been with us since the dawn of time while mainstream science is roughly just her age. She was never vaccinated either. Yet she’s healthier than those of us who turned away from the common sense lifestyle and embraced the U.S. way of life. We paid the price with bad health. Since learning from those mistakes, we’ve not only learned to understand the value of eating smart, but we are free of illness and disease. There are anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antibiotic, antiviral, properties in turmeric, oregano, sea salt, coconut oit, and other herbs and spices. A diseased-body lacks a balanced alkaline level and wholesome nutrients. We can add to our daily diet lemons, grapes, dark leafy greens, as examples, to restore our alkaline levels. I think that we, as a nation, are in dire need of nutrition knowledge. We’ve been stripped of that by allowing food corporations and Western medicine to control our health. Doctors are no longer healers. We need healthier options and the title does not invite anyone to at least learn or try.

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    FSMPastapharian Reply:

    No. You did not “cure” cancer, Crohn’s, or diabetes with herbs or any other type of “nutrition.” It can’t hurt to eat healthy, unprocessed foods, but your naive beliefs are going to end up killing someone if you pretend to know what you’re talking about. You don’t. Do what you want with your own life, but don’t even think you should be spreading this dangerous woofúckery to others.

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  • Michelle Elrod

    I guess Hippocrates must have been an idiot huh

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  • http://www.nourish-balance-heal.com Pepper Culpepper

    I’ve read that cancer feeds on sugar. That being said, drinking a heap of juice would be the exact opposite of what you would want to do. If I ever had the choice to make, I would NOT get chemotherapy either.

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    Monkeyfish Reply:

    Then you would die, most likely. ALL cells feed on sugar, or more specifically glucose. That’s what the body takes, takes food, breaks it down into glucose so it can be used in energy. That’s what feeds your brain too, so maybe you need some more of it?

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  • kate

    I think to say ‘diet doesn’t cure disease’ is a little bit dismissive of all the people who have returned to wellness with the assistance of diet…healing can take many paths and more often that not it is a variety of factors and approaches that brings about wellness, diet being only one of them, but a significant factor. The functional approach would be to address not just your nutrition but your emotional, mental and spiritual terrain by whatever means that resonate…and if supplements, herbs, homeopathy and conventional medicine all assist you on your journey…wonderful

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  • Kate

    What a good job Sarah!

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  • C Quella

    Hundreds of millions of dollars poured into cancer research and treatment hasn’t changed in more than 20 years. Why? Because billions are being made in the ‘treatment.’ Medical research is a farce and I know this first hand. You trust the medical system if you want to, but I will NEVER trust them – I’ve seen too much. I’m not saying I wouldn’t use some traditional medicine, but only in conjunction with alternatives.

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  • alphadorsey

    Many medicines are derived from a variety of the exact same compounds found in food. The dosage of the compounds in a pill of course is greater than one would get from a single serving of food. But the continued usage of certain food items accumulate in the body and produce medicinal results. One example is Stinging Nettle tea and it’s impact on histamine invoked allergies. Furthermore, if one can admit that industrial food is at the root of many disease why is it so far of a stretch to see food as a way to heal some of them?

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  • Barbara

    Alleged “health” bloggers are working for big industries…check out the article about Coca-Cola getting its message out about how healthy it is through bloggers. Surely many are supporting big pharma as well…

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  • may

    Diet and supplements cured my severe rheumatoid arthritis. 17 years of toxic orthodox treatment did nothing to slow my disease and left me deformed and wheelchhair crippled. 3 weeks of diet and supplements through a nutritionist (i was referred by an enlightened and amazing Rheumatologist!!) And i was walking and pain free. My rheumatologist discharged me from his care. 17 years later i am still walking, the only thing that slows me down is the deformities that hapoened under orthodox treatment. What is totally irresponsible is people with no qualifications telling people to follow this diet and that diet. And that includes people like you making grand sweeping statements with no understanding and no medical or nutritional training. Completely irresponsible.

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  • Fin Mackenzie

    actually i dont agree..some medical conditions can be completely cured by diet. I love your approach sarah but dont agree.
    you mention one persons way of dealing with cancer treatment who did not opt to go the medical route. What about all those who do use chemo (slash and burn) and die anyway with extremely poor quality of life? You dont mention the 1.5 million australians who suffer an adverse drug reaction ( out of HALF the over 50 adult population of Australia is on pharmaceutical meds) with 190,000 hospital admissions because of these reactions. if people are going to continue to take absolutely no responsibility for their health then of course continue with your pharmaceutical drug habit… but DONT say you cant do anything about it. Chronic disease is the new epidemic and that is mostly preventable through diet…

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  • mssloop

    I’m very glad to see someone stating in a blog that diet does not cure chronic disease. I have to disagree with a couple of your points though. First of all, while poor diet can lead to diseases and may even be a trigger for some autoimmune illnesses, it is irresponsible of you to state, in an absolutist phrasing, that poor diet DOES lead to disease. And I personally feel the way in which you state it would give many in the healthy world the idea that they can blame our illness(es) on past dietary habits. This especially bothers me as my brother became a Type diabetic and I developed psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis ~45 years ago, when processed foods were less common, more expensive and rarely allowed by our mother.

    the second point I take issue with is, to quote, “good, real, unprocessed food is highly effective (actually, non-negotiable) when managing chronic illness.” I understand where you are coming from and I can see this is true for many illnesses. I frankly *prefer* a diet that most nutritionists would applaud, but I am no longer able to eat that way. In 2008 I started getting small bowel obstructions. without going through the whole story, it turned out I had developed Crohn’s but my medications for other autoimmune illnesses had suppressed my symptoms. the first indication of trouble was the obstructions at the intestinal strictures caused by the prolonged intestinal inflammation. I’ve had surgery for the strictures, I’m on medication for my psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and crohn’s, but to this day if I eat raw fruit or vegetables, anything with seeds or seeds themselves, legumes, whole grains and even a number of cooked vegetables, I will be in agony and cannot leave the immediate proximity of a bathroom for a couple of days. I fantasize about salads. I ate “good, real, unprocessed food” for decades. Not only did it not prevent any of my 4 chronic illnesses (I have fibromyalgia also, secondary to the chronic pain of my arthritis), I no longer can even choose that diet if I want to function at all.

    Please keep in mind that there are hundreds of chronic illnesses, even dozens of known autoimmune illnesses (at this time). Symptomolgy varies widely, causes and triggers are unknown in most cases and while it is always advisable to eat as healthily as you can manage, not every chronically ill person can eat the ideal diet you say is non-negotiable.

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  • homebody

    What about this direct quote from one of your own posts on this site:
    “I write about this often and about how food really is the best medicine (not just a jaded slogan). Truly, it is. We can take charge now.”

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  • Charlotte smith

    I am a registered nurse and I have witness people manage and in many cases reverse chronic conditions using diet. These conditions range from rheumatoid, diabetes, cancer, pcos and heart disease.

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  • Chloe

    I love this article Sarah, but I think you’ve lost a lot of people with the title. I understand it’s a blanket statement that you justify and you are in fact supporting nutritional management of disease, but I don’t believe you should be saying that “diet doesn’t cure disease”, as it’s fuel to the fire of non-believers and definitely isn’t always true. I support the need for medical intervention where nutrition (and herbal medicine) isn’t enough or needs a temporary hand but am constantly amazed at how many afflictions can be alleviated with diet alone…. to never return.

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  • Rebecca Anderson

    Apparent this is her uninformed opinion..clinical studies prove diet can cure..i.e. dr wahls clinical studies using the wahls protocol on ms, proven ketogenic diets help neuro disorders, and vit c makes a significant difference in cancer patients. .someone has a research defecit..^^^

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  • Steve

    This article is irresponsible. Its a very manipulative title and no where in the article does she show any real evidence of what her title claims. This is an opinion based article, not fact based.

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  • christina

    Amen

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  • Carolyn Norman

    Agree.

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  • Rod Sison

    I agree totally! Thank you for this post.

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  • Eric Generaux

    Gerson himself stated that his protocol was ineffective if chemotherapy had already been tried as the immune system was damaged by that

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  • Bo

    You are amazing!!!

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  • Anon

    By the way I have ovarian cancer and am currently doing the natural medicine to remove the cancer and the cause of it. I would never ever do the conventional medicine treatment for cancer because that is being cruel to my body, and I love my body too much to be cruel to it. I have seen what the conventional medicine for cancer does to people and that is just too cruel. The natural medicine treatment for cancer that I doing through a health coach who is well-known in the natural medicine industry is working successfully, I have even got my lovely doctor excited about it.

    How would I remove the cancer cause with conventional medicine, after loads and loads of toxins are put into my system? I have to remove the cause in order to heal properly and can’t when I have put loads and loads of toxins into my body.

    Also my health coach has successfully healed thousands of people around the world with cancer and other health problems. Natural medicine feels so much better than destroying your body with conventional medicine.

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    Anon Reply:

    Please for the love of god don’t let a “health coach” try and treat your cancer.

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    Anon Reply:

    Why???

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  • Ann

    I cured myself of breast cancer in 2006 with organic food, pure water, vitamins and natural therapies. All the hospital say to me is you need a ‘double mastectomy’ – I disagree with Western medicine as they treat the symptons not the root causes. They have been telling me I am close to death since 2006 luckily I don’t buy into that. The body must be treated holisitically. Disease cannot thrive in an alkaline body. Cancer is easy to cure and complex at the same time. Geopathic stress in a house can cause cancer for example, EMFs cause illness, emotional stress e.g. often people get cancer 2 years after a traumatic event. Everyone needs to make their own choices, some people don’t want to completely change their diet and lifestlye. Sarah’s book is invaluable in telling people about the dangers of sugar. If you ahve chemo you are told to drink suagary drinks – surely that it just accelerating someone’s death.

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    Anon Reply:

    That is wonderful!!! Finally someone is doing the right thing on this blog article!!! I totally agree with natural medicine and disagree with conventional medicine in a big way.

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  • http://www.abetterwaytohealth.com/ Mel Hopper Koppelman

    I definitely appreciate the message here, particularly when it comes to highlighting safety issues and people taking a message out of context. That said, I disagree with your bottom line. Sometimes, diet does ‘cure’ chronic health issues, when caught early enough and there has been minimal tissue damage or change, particularly when the chronic illness was caused by a poor diet in the first place.

    Your example of Hashimoto’s is a perfect one – if someone is diagnosed with Hashimoto’s (impaired thyroid function and presence of thyroid autoantibodies) and addresses the underlying cause or causes of the immune disregulation through diet then I would expect a reduction of autoantibodies and an improvement in thyroid function, allowing for a reduction in thyroxine, as you experienced, or if caught early enough where there’s less damage to the gland, someone may no longer require thyroxine at all (as determined by their endocrinologist). If someone has restored the thyroid gland to optimal function, no longer requires exogenous thyroxine, and no longer has thyroid auto-antibodies, that person has ‘cured’ their Hashimoto’s.

    Food is always medicine when you’re chronically sick, in some cases it’s enough on its own. In many cases conventional medicine will also still be required. But you should always consult a qualified healthcare practitioner who can help you determine what you need.

    Repeating and agreeing with your message, however, is that people should remain under the care of their conventional doctor (in this case, their ‘bog standard endocrinologist’) and work with and listen to their own body.

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  • Jacqui Ish James

    Yep. I liked Pete Evans until he persisted in posting information claiming Paleo “cures” autism. As an autistic Mum of 3 autism spectrum kids, I KNOW it’s a big fat lie. Yeah we don’t eat junk because it makes us feel bad, but that goes for anyone.

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  • Me

    I had 2 very painful, chronic illness’s and do not have them any more. I went the western medical route at first and only became worse. Found a Wholistic doc and another Chinese medicine doc and worked with them for 10 years. No drugs, only supplements and good, organic and clean foods. I was diligent and determined to beat the dire diagnosis. I wasn’t born this way, I became this way, so I made a choice and listened to my inner guidance system and found what I needed. Our bodies do have the ability to heal but we also need to clean out our mind and spirit of the negative.

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  • elle bee

    It is heart wrenching to read posts about humans dealing with disease .All these so called “Auto immune” disease doesnt have to be ” managed”. It’s all reversable. Your immune system is not a dummy and just “goes nuts”.there is always an underlying cause that medical docs cant see.t The body us telling us something is wrong. Wake up people, there is more info out there. Dig deeper. We have been conditoned to think disease is the norm. it is not! Do not accept to just manage your disease.

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  • elle bee

    CHRONIC ILLNESS IS CURABLE.

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    elle bee Reply:

    My hashimoto disease is completely gone

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  • elle bee

    If you believe food can prevent disease, and crappy processed food can cause disease….why wouldn’t you believe food can heal?????? Does not make Any sense.

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  • Debra Copes

    Diet and vegetables keeps u out of the doctors office so u dont have to take synthetic medications, I guess u have a steak in maine stream dollars so ……

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    elle bee Reply:

    I agree

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  • Anon

    One comment that I wrote a reader has commented using my name ‘Anon’ telling me that I shouldn’t have a health coach for my ovarian cancer. Sorry but I think that is ridiculous, as she has helped me more than anyone else would ever be able to do. My cancer is almost gone, thanks to my health coach in natural medicine. My health coach is healing my mind, body and spirit, something that conventional medicine would no idea of how to do.

    Why not support natural medicine like I do and ALWAYS will? With the conventional cancer treatment, it slowly destroys the immune system, unlike natural medicine which repairs the immune system. Also the conventional cancer treatment also puts loads and loads of toxins into the body, so it is impossible to remove the cause of the cancer, unlike the natural treatment it flushes out the toxins as well as the cause. Without removing the cause of the cancer, it is impossible to survive.

    God bless you all and hopefully you will wake up and release that natural medicine is the way to go.

    I just LOVE defending natural medicine and not conventional medicine.

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  • Mark

    Lol Sarah which pharmaceutical company are you a director of , and is your husband a pig farmer ?

    It seems you want to push bacon on the vegans of the world ?

    After suffering for 15 years , I cured myself of chronic IBS / Chrons with alkaline herbs and diet

    Doctors did absolutely nothing but take tens of thousands of dollars off me while telling me its “incurable”

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  • anonymous

    It’s a general rule that when a complementary or alternative therapy (CAM) is being used by a patient, and something goes wrong, the first thing to be blamed is the CAM therapy. Does anyone, except her personal oncologist have the actual details of her complete medical history? If you don’t have those credentials, and don’t have her file in front of you, then who are you to say that what she did, or did not do harmed her? The woman had cancer, and she died. How about a little bit of respect for the deceased.

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  • mike

    It does not appear that this author has any credentials to be giving nutritional advice let alone taking a definitive position on treatment of chronic diseases, of which many people have indeed reversed through nutrition. Please disregard this woman’s advice and start with books like Reversing Heart Disease by Dr. Dean Ornish, or Fit for Life, The Yeast Connection by William Crook, M.D. (for reversing autoimmune diseases:)….etc., etc…

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  • Lily

    From everything I have read/heard I really disagree completely, I think you have limited knowledge of the healing people have done through diet. I do not think diet can be a definite 100% cure for diseases, and I think it is often also emotional and spiritually based.

    Jess Ainscough is not a good example, because she was not strict about her diet compared to people who have totally reversed severe illness. I’m not saying she died because she was not strict enough about her diet, but I am just pointing out it is a poor example for diet related healing. There are many diet related and natural healing methods out there that have proven to completely reverse illness. However western medicine also has it’s place. I personally think no matter what you do it is going to be a risk, and perhaps from a spiritual standpoint it doesn’t matter which route you take as long as you heal from within first.

    I personally think it is irresponsible to scare people off natural healing methods.

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  • V

    The bigger Q: Why then do we turn to alternative healing modalities? Is it about the time practitioners spend with patients when compared to conventional doctors, the attention, the shift from an external intervention being applied ‘to you’ – to internal locus of control with regards to letting the body heal itself? Is it about dignity of healing? The Western medical profession has a lot to learn from unconventional therapies… if they choose to ignore this part of the issue it’s a wasted opportunity. And if Jess Ainscough’s family is reading this, I want you to know that I for one found this post highly insensitive in it’s positioning.

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  • Rebecca

    While I agree with many facets of this article, there are some misleading statements. It was stated that “Food is not medicine if you’re chronically sick” . Food/healthy diet has been proven to reverse Type II Diabetes, especially when combined with 150 minutes of weekly physical activity.

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  • Wendy Daniels

    I don’t understand some of your food/disease comments in your discussion of coffee. You say that caffeine dehydrates you but one of the problems with AI is fluid retention. So caffeine should help this. Also, fluid retention and salt loss do not cause thirst. Fluid loss and salt retention cause thirst. You also talk about illness caused when caffeine affects stomach acid production. The body seems to have lots of systems to keep the blood acid/alkali level very controlled. These include the lungs, blood and kidneys. You state that losing stomach acid is bad (and reference another website saying the same) but then say you try to keep your body alkaline, that is, not acid. This does not make sense. I find this all very confusing.

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  • Paleo Huntress

    T2Diabetes is a chronic disease. Are you suggesting that diet can’t cure it?

    [Reply]

  • http://swlife.com.au Jacinta Keeble

    Great article. I believe that food is powerful. It can poison you or it can nourish you. It can even heal some ailments but not all.
    I try to provide the most nutrient dense food for my family, I am in the process of cutting out things like plastic and toxic cleaning and beauty products around our home. I do Yoga, I meditate, belly dance, I use essential oils, practice gentle parenting and try to spend as much time as I can in nature (and I read a lot too).
    BUT I also immunise and if anyone in my family gets sick I take them to our fantastic GP and if need be, the best medical specialist I could find, maybe even two or three to get another opinion if it was really serious.
    When it comes to the health of my family, Mumma don’t play!

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  • Rachael Swanker

    I was diagnosed of hepatitis B in 2011 and I have tried all possible means to get cure but all to no avail, until i saw a post in a health forum about a herbal doctor from South Africa who prepare herbal medicine to cure all kind of diseases including pancreatitis, at first i doubted if it was real but decided to give it a try, when i contact this herbal doctor via his email, he prepared an herbal medicine and sent it to me via courier service, when i received this herbal medicine, he gave me step by instructions on how to apply it, when i applied it as instructed, i was cured of this deadly disease within 6 days, I am now free from the deadly disease, my digestive system is now working perfectly, i no longer feel all the horrible pains. Contact this great herbal doctor via his email sowetoherbalmedicine@gmail.com

    [Reply]

    Sarah Reply:

    Another spammer here too, Leonie!

    [Reply]

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  • vincent

    Thank God Almighty that lead me to Rick Simpson, My Wife lungs cancer has been cured within the Rick Simpson Hemp oil. My wife has been through chemo 3 times, but this time his condition was getting worse that I was afraid it will kill her. When a friend of mine directed me to Rick Simpson at: (akpespellcaster@gmail.com ) where I could buy the medication from, because the Rick Simpson has help cured his own Brain tumor and I strongly recommend that he would helped me with my wife cancer and cure it completely, I never believed the story, but today, with thanks giving in my heart, My wife lungs cancer has been cured within the Rick Simpson hemp oil and I want you all to join hands in appreciation of the great work that is been done by rick Simpson, he is the man that saved the life of my wife with hemp oil, thanks to him. for all those who have problem relating to cancer and other diseases should contact him through his emai(akpespellcaster@gmail.com ) I’ll keep thanking him because his God sent to save my family that was at the stage of collapsing all because of my wife cancer. Vincent Wright , From USA or call him +2349054928594..

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  • Andrew Wise Williams

    Hello Everyone, i m Adam from Italian. I want to share my testimonies to the general public on how this great man called Dr.ODUDU cure my HIV/AIDS disease. I have been a HIV/AIDS positive for over 9 month and i have been in pains until i came across this young man when i traveled to Australia for Business trip who happen to once been a HIV/AIDS disease, i explained every thing to her and she told me that there is this Great Dr, that help her to cure her HIV/AIDS disease and she gave me his email address for me to contact and i did as she instructed. And the man odudu told me how much to buy the HIV/AIDS herbal medication and how i will get it, which i did. And to my greatest surprise that i took the HIV/AIDS herbal medicine for just one week and behold i went for a HIV/AIDS test, for to my greatest surprise for the Doctor confirmed me to HIV/AIDS free and said that i no longer have HIV/AIDS in my system and till now i have never felt any HIV/AIDS again, so i said i must testify the goodness of this man to the general public for if you are there surfing from this HIV/AIDS problems or any deadly disease or other disease for i will advice you to contact him on his working email: dr.oduduherbalhome@gmail.com dr.oduduherbalhome@hotmail.com dr.oduduherbalhome@yahoo.com phone contact phone him or whatsapp dr.odudu true this contact +2348101571054,

    [Reply]

  • Caroline Carter

    I disagree. Just because diet did not work for these two, it does not mean it has not worked for others. My nutritionists father being one of them. He has this week received the all clear from bladder cancer when he had been told his only chance was bladder removal.

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  • Lawrence SanDiego

    Docs told me I had 2 years before I would be in a wheelchair. I changed my diet and 5 years later in am writing this from a gym. Say what u want but something is working for me and there is no way I am changing my eating habits – have MS.

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  • Stephen

    sarah I could write a book here on how an why you are so WRONG…DEAD WRONG….Yu have absolutely n sea what you are talking about when you say “food does not stop disease”

    Tell you what sarah, I’ll write that book here and wade in to a debate with you and prove you factually wrong, if you can right now name 5 nutrient components off the top of your head in an Avocado, rd capsicum, Orange, carrot, tomato…..Just five for each. I now bet you could not name more than one or even one for all of them…..Guess what sarah? Either can your doctor. All doctors over an 8 year studies course do 3 to 4% nutritional studies and even then it s aid for and run by the FDA, AMA…

    What causes colon Cancer sarah? What causes Bowel Cancer sarah? Apparently your Doctors don’t even know what causes Colon Cancer, they lie and speak crap…..Colon Cancer like any disease including auto immune disease s from over filling the colonic fact (alimentary canal) with toxicity fem processed foods and even the foods like a fresh pecs of celery sitting on your supermarket shelf, filled with 72 different types of chemicals from the herbicides and pesticides used to grow them fast. You don’t know that did you! Yu also don’t know that “food” or “liquid” such as organic apple vier vinegar was used n an experiment to strip those chemicals from the celery and then later tested and all chemicals were then absent from the pecs of celery…Wow, I guess now you may be getting the picture!.

    Maybe learn blood PH levels being above 7 to deter Cancer, learn how cells RE FOUND IN THE BODY by doctors placing little sugar tablets in to the body and on their scans the Cancer cells light up when they eat on the guar! And guess what the lovely medical world iv stuffing the sick kid siting in their hospital beds with Cancer, tumours etc…Yep ice cream and fake black current juice filled with sugar!!

    Your body is over loaded with crap and filth and you need to as Tyler Tolman explains (read his comment below and check out his link) that you need to fast, and trip that waste from your body…..

    Tyler can explain all, he and his father Don Tolman are real medical lath experts, just not licensed drug pushers like your doctor that funnily enough can’t heal you or that Cancer patient who died…Oh and please learn how lemons are 10,000 times more powerful than chemo but guess what, the big Pharma world can’t patent a lemon!!

    Anyone that rads the, please You Tube “Don Tolman Part 1” an watch him in part 2, 3 an so on and you all be awakened t the truth of what the medical world are doing then listen to Tyler also and they will reveal the truth in real healing with food and fasting 😉

    [Reply]

  • Stephanie Young

    Claiming “Diet doesn’t cure disease” is pretty ignorant considering your credentials.

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  • Jennifer34

    Well medication never cures disease. We have all these “idiopathic” disorders and autoimmune disorders with no apparent cause. People are placed on medication that covers the symptoms by essentially subduing and attacking their immune system leaving them vulnerable to so many other diseases. We consume GMO crops, some of which were engineered to produce their own pesticide and others which were engineered to survive the roundup herbicide (which has been declared a carcinogen by WHO). We consume all these crops and processed foods and expect our good gastrointestinal bacteria to survive the constant attacks and then we wonder why people are developing chron’s disease and colitis and candida. We consume, on a daily basis chemicals that are unfamiliar to our human system and we don’t know what side products are produced by the liver when it tries to metabolize these foreign chemicals? Yet we wonder have such a large portion of the population with autoimmune disorders.

    The immune system is not “crazy”. It is attacking something foreign on our cells and in our tissues and in the interstitial fluid between our cells.

    Why are people in the “blue zones” of the world leaving past 100 years of age? It’s not just the genes. My family from outside of the united states all live well into their 90s but they eat plants, grains, fresh water and very, very little processed foods and meats. The family that has migrated to the united states have been dying in their 60s, usually from cancer and are living with the common afflictions in the united states, of arthritis, osteoporosis and a host of other diseases. We all share the same gene pool, so why the vast difference in life expectancy? The only difference is what we consume.

    How can you read the literature and be a physician and not consider the idea that if it is this toxic food is making us sick, and it is, how can organic, whole foods from untainted food sources not be the solution.

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  • Jennifer34

    By the way, I have seen many, many tragic deaths from conventional cancer treatments, but we never questions deaths from current cancer treatments. Those deaths are considered justifiable deaths.

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  • Aaron Hill

    One study does not make for strong evidence Tyler. Cohort studies and Meta-Analysis make for strong evidence. You comment regarding quantum physics and DNA is misleading at best. Quantum Physics describes the basic mechanisms of the structure of the universe and how the energy of all particles interact. By definition this means that DNA, Water, MEthane, Cyanide, Pesticides, Sugar, Dust, Dinosaurs, Don Tyler and every other particle in the universe is DESCRIBED by quantum physics. Saying it is affected DNA is affected by the quantum physics environment means absolutely zero, nothing, nada zilch. Don’t believe me, go and checkout a basic Year 1 physics textbook in any University class. You are using words to manipulate people and you are very good at it. I have met people that are experts at this and you have been trained by some of them. Or maybe it was the way your father, Don Tolman, indoctrinated you from birth. Maybe you don’t know any better and have no independent free thought because you are just doing what Daddy programmed you to do?

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