• Virginia Woolf portends an age of angry men I finally read Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own. Can I implore you to (re)read it in these modern times? It remains insightful and in being so, is quite a reflection of our lack of evolution. Or perhaps a reminder that some themes may always pervade. Woolf asks big questions about women and writing, more
  • The First, We Make the Beast Beautiful book club guide is here One of the reasons I wrote First, We Make The Beast Beautiful was to start a new conversation about anxiety. Every chat we have about anxiety –  with loved ones, friends, colleagues, strangers – brings us in closer, and making us feel less lonely, which, as I explain in The Beast, allows us to do more
  • We need a new moral code. Here’s my reading list. This is where I think we are going wrong right now. We lack inspiring, spiritual guidance. I’m going to rant for a bit, and provide some interesting links and reads for you. Then ask you to cite what guides you, with links. Cool? In the olden days, we had ritual and religion and social morays more
  • The sisterhood of pain and PTSD…an interesting perspective I just read Sebastian Junger’s Tribe. Junger is a war journalist who posits that post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among veterans is mostly an issue with homecoming. That is, the most devastating and longterm psychological stress doesn’t come from the horrors of war so much as from the cold contrast of reintegrating into a society that more
  • That’s the way real men behave. Good night. What do you make of this take on masculinity? Or, if you prefer, this take on the importance of certainty. Yes, this is another post inspired by Zorba the Greek. See my rant about uneasiness and letting go, too, if you like. The two nomad friends must part ways in the morning. The “Boss” can’t more
  • Why am I a nomad? Have you read Bruce Chatwin? I read Songlines, his fiction-meets-non-fiction account of his travels in deep Aboriginal country during a hiking trip at the start of the year. It’s worth a read. As I shared with my friend and National Geographic explorer Dan Buettner: “He is a rare writer who can actually insert himself into a story and more
  • What Zorba The Greek taught me about being free (prepare for f*cking gold!) I flagged a post ago about why Zorba the Greek is a book that must be read that I’ll be sharing several Zorba lessons. Such is the impact it’s had on me. The first was about my uneasiness in the face of the “is-ness” of life. Here’s another. It’s possibly the most succinct overview of what it takes more
  • In which I explain why Zorba The Greek must be read I’m in love with Zorba The Greek. He’s a character (in a novel), a real man (Nikos Kazantzakis based the character on someone he met in the 1920s), and he’s every Greek I’ve ever loved, for he distills all that I have in my heart, waiting to be expressed in full, in stunning exclamations that cut Right To more
  • The 9 best books that help heal anxiety I read widely and wonderfully while researching first, we make the beast beautiful, my book about my anxious journey. Actually, I’ve researched the topic for decades now and read many a fretty memoir, some more insightful and enriching than others. Here’s my pick of the bunch with short reviews. Because I did promise I’d provide more
  • Lonely much? Me too. This helps. Further to my post on Martha Nussbaum’s notion of seeking out difficulty to have a good life, I’d like to chat to you about a rant on the value of loneliness I came across today on BrainPickings.com. The rant picks up on an idea explored in The Lonely City by Olive Laing – that loneliess more