Beet and Turmeric Kvass Tonic

Posted on August 26th, 2014

You read it first here: The next chapter in my health explorations is the microbiome. Yep, I’m all about healing the gut right now. I’ll touch on this in more detail shortly; meantime I’m just working on recipes that get my gut gunning with gas (or without it, as preferred case may be). Kvass is one such ammunition in my holster.

Beet xxx, recipe below

My Beet and Turmeric Kvass tonic, recipe below

A traditional Ukrainian drink, beet kvass is fermented with Lactobacillus bacteria and is a pink probiotic powerhouse punch with a slightly rustic, earthy flavour. As my gutsiest guru Sally Fallon says:

One 4-ounce glass, morning and night, is an excellent blood tonic, cleanses the liver and is a good treatment for kidney stones and other ailments.”

She also says that beet kvass is widely used in cancer therapy in Europe and in the treatment of chronic fatigue, chemical sensitivities, allergies and digestive problems.

I’ve added turmeric, because I recently read that turmeric needs to be fermented for the full benefits of this little root to be experienced. If you can’t find turmeric, simply make it with straight beetroot.

Beetroot and Turmeric Kvass

  • 2 large beetroots, scrubbed and coarsely chopped
  • 10 cm turmeric scrubbed or peeled (depending on how rough and gritty the skin is), chopped Read more

Paleo salmon chowder plus a giveaway

Posted on May 23rd, 2014

The interwebs continue to get tighter. As some of you know, I recently connected with Mickey Trescott from Autoimmune-Paleo.com via Instagram (I think it was) on my recent US trip. Turns out she found me years ago when she got diagnosed with hashimotos and began reading my autoimmune posts. Wonderfully, she went on to study the topic intensely and now follows a strict autoimmune protocol, thus healing herself dramatically.

Salmon Chowder xxx

Mickey’s Salmon Chowder, recipe below

Her tenacious and dedicated efforts put mine to shame (I get a bit lax with the grains, nightshades and gut-building stuff).

Anyway, when I passed through Seattle we managed to catch up for brunch and bush walk and did what hashis sufferers do best – talk passionately and excitedly about stuff…including our illness. Turns out her book was about to come out and she promised to let me loop readers here into things when it did and to share a recipe and give away a few copies. (Giveaway details below.) Here’s her chowder…totally Paleo and gut-building and autoimmune protocol perfect.

Salmon isn’t necessarily the most sustainable fish to eat (large fish generally aren’t; to see my guide on which are, go here), but when you’re using the carcass to make the stock (as you do in this recipe), you can offset things somewhat. Also, I advise asking your monger to give you the offcuts (not the cutlet or steak) – you’re cutting it up; it doesn’t need to be a perfect shape. Additionally, I advise tossing the bones and skin Mickey asks you to trim into the Read more

How to Heal Autoimmune Disease: 6 clever tricks from Mickey at Autoimmune-Paleo.com

Posted on May 7th, 2014

For three years now I’ve been running this occasional series of posts geared at making anyone with autoimmune disease feel less like a freak. It’s been extraordinary…I’d say more than half of all readers here came to this blog for the AI information. Even more extraordinarily, a huge chunk of the rest of you have later developed an AI or found out a loved one had. Add to this, so many of the like-minded bloggers who I’ve got to know around the world have AI’s. I’m talking Cannelle Vanille, Glutenfreegirl, Gabby Bernstein, Clare Bowditch, DeliciouslyElla, Louniverse and many more.

As I say often, we’re a “type”. We’re earnest, ambitious, solo operators and with a drive to communicate and help. It should come as no surprise to us that our thyroids, the site of communication, presents us with challenges!

A hike and hashi chat with Mickey Trescott in Seattle

A hike and hashi chat with Mickey in Seattle

Recently, Mickey Trescott came into my orbit and we hooked up for a Paleo breakfast – and an impromptu hike! – in Seattle. She began following my blog a few years back… and now has her own site where she shares incredible, dedicated information about how to heal AI. She’s also just self-published her own cookbook, The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook.

I figure you all might find her personal story and her tricks for dealing with thyroid crappiness helpful. She knows her stuff. Over to you Mickey…

I’m Mickey Trescott and I write about nutrition and autoimmune disease. I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease when I turned 26 and have spent the last three years digging myself out of the deep, dark hole that was my epic autoimmune crash. I started my journey having been vegan for a decade, and ended up on the Paleo end of the spectrum after I figured out that grains, sugar, and a lot of other elements of my diet were doing me no good. I like to take a multifaceted approach to managing autoimmunity—one that takes into account not just diet, but stress management, movement, and living a more balanced life. Here are a few of my tricks to staying healthy and happy, despite autoimmunity!

Six ways I keep my autoimmunity at bay:

1. Mini rebounding trampoline.

Those of us with Hashimoto’s know how awful it feels to have lymphatic congestion—I get it mostly in my face and neck (which is quite unattractive!). Since the lymphatic system does not have a pump, it is dependent on the movement of our bodies for circulation. Mini rebounding trampolines are great because they vigorously circulate lymph with just tenminutes of gentle bouncing. I bought one from Rebound Air and keep it in my office for “bounce breaks”. Even on days where I am not feeling up to exercising, I can manage a little bounce to get everything moving, reducing puffiness and congestion.

2. Soil-based probiotics.

Since we now know that gut issues are at the root of autoimmune disease, I do everything I can to keep my flora balanced and happy. Our digestive tracts are home to thousands of different species of bacteria, not just the few strains found in regular probiotics these days (like lactobacillus). While I eat fermented foods and have taken traditional probiotics in Read more