My Simplicious Kitcheri Recipe

Posted on May 19th, 2016

Yesterday I shared the gist of what kitcheri is all about. Now, here’s the recipe I work to, which keeps it as simple as possible.

Kitcheri, image via Ashley Neese

Kitcheri, image via Ashley Neese

I also have a Nourishing Kitcheri recipe in I Quit Sugar For Life and an Inside-Out Sprouted Kitcheri Loaf inSimplicious. I’ve also shared the whole deal with Ayurveda healing. And written a post detailing my experience at an Indian clinic.

My Simplicious Kitcheri

  • 1 cup white basmati rice
  • 1 cup of split mung dhal – yellow or green
  • 1 tbls of ghee
  • 1 tbls of Panch Phora spice mix (or mix equal parts fennel seeds, cumin seeds, fenugreek and mustard seeds
  • 8 curry leaves
  • 1 tbls of grated fresh turmeric or 1 tsp of turmeric powder
  • very big grind of black pepper
  • ½ tsp Asafetida
  • 6 cups of water, boiling
  • 3-4 cups of diced vegetables (zucchini, sweet potato, carrot) or silverbeet. But only choose 1-2 varieties, not all four at once.
  • 1 bunch fresh coriander, chopped
  • juice of half a lemon or lime
  • salt and pepper to taste

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How to make Ayurvedic kitcheri…for beginners

Posted on May 18th, 2016

First, what is this kitcheri (pronounced kich-ah-ree) stuff I speak of rather often. (I have a recipe for Nourishing Kitcheri in I Quit Sugar For Life and an Inside-Out Sprouted Kitcheri Loaf in Simplicious; I also shared how I ate it at the Indian retreat I did some time back.)

Been playing around with kitcheri recipes. Heard of the stuff? According to Ayurveda, it's the most balancing and gut-settling meal possible. to me it's also a vehicle for a generous dollop of ghee, lots of fresh tumeric and coriander.

My kitcheri combo: a vehicle for a generous dollop of ghee, lots of fresh tumeric and coriander.

In Ayurveda this mung and rice curried bowl of sweet, soft, soupy goodness is considered the ultimate digestion-healing and detox food. It’s warming, soft, light and designed to fire up your digestive energy, or “agni”, via a bunch of select spices. Indeed, it’s served in clinics when people are sick and is used for cleansing purposes (where you eat it breakfast, lunch and dinner).

But it’s a whole lotta grains and legumes!

I know, I know. The stuff is made from mung daal and basmati rice.

At first, I was dubious. I bloat up from such foods normally and tend to avoid them. But consumed in this combo, with the spices and ghee that’s added, something mysterious happens and I’ve found that when I do eat it, my digestion is pacified. Almost immediately.

I asked Ayurvedic consultant Nadia Marshall to explain the deal from an Ayurvedic perspective:

“Both mung daal and basmati rice are light in quality with a predominantly sweet taste (mung is also astringent), a cooling digestive effect and a sweet post-digestive effect. It is quite rare to have foods that are sweet/cooling/sweet… but also light. As a result, mung daal and basmati rice have the special quality of being nourishing for the tissues and immune system but also light and easy to digest. Mung and basmati’s sweet quality (both as their taste and post-digestive effect) has a calming, grounding effect on the mind/body but is also Read more

Meet the new Julie and Julia…

Posted on April 27th, 2016

I’m pegging myself as something of a Julia Childs here. Forgive me for the lack of humility. I’ll explain. Quickly. And then we can move onto pretty pictures.

A while back Jo invited readers to cook their way through my latest book, Simplicious. All 306 recipes. Which is quite the endeavour. A stack of keen cookers took up the challenge, veritable Julies in this equation (get the reference now?).

Sweet Potato Nachos: I made a giant family tray using pulled pork from the freezer. My 5-year-old loved his ‘sweet potato boats’, and of course, the corn cobs were saved to make corn cob stock.

Erin’s take on my Sweet Potato Nachos. She says: I made a giant family tray using pulled pork from the freezer. My 5-year-old loved his ‘sweet potato boats’ and, of course, the corn cobs were saved to make corn cob stock.

I’ve been sharing results on Instagram. But I reckon Erin’s efforts are so bloody impressive they deserve a full interweb page.

Over to you, Erin.

Why I’m cooking my way through the book:

I love cookbooks. I own nearly 80 cookbooks.  But I have a bad habit of cooking only a handful of recipes from each book, returning to the same, familiar and appealing recipes.

I always fancied the idea of doing a Julie and Julia style challenge – to deliberately cook every single recipe from one cookbook – but I’d never found ‘the’ book to do it. When I started flicking through Simplicious, I immediately felt that it met all the criteria for such a challenge. Based on IQS principles, it aligns with my way of eating; it’s Read more