• Why am I a nomad? Have you read Bruce Chatwin? I read Songlines, his fiction-meets-non-fiction account of his travels in deep Aboriginal country during a hiking trip at the start of the year. It’s worth a read. As I shared with my friend and National Geographic explorer Dan Buettner: “He is a rare writer who can actually insert himself into a story and more
  • The secret to a good life? Hunt down difficulty I’ve read about the work of philosopher Martha Nussbaum for a while. She’s one of the most prolific thinkers around. Nussbaum has published 24 books, 509 papers and received 57 honorary degrees. Last month she won the Kyoto Prize, the most prestigious award offered in fields not eligible for a Nobel. And so on, so more
  • Are you a thru-hiker? Mega-author Bill Bryson got into hiking for a bit, wrote a book about it which then became a movie. I’ve followed a bit of discourse on his hiking thoughts. I came across this critique that picks up on the fact that on his big hike along the Appalachian Trail he failed to thru-hike. That is, he more
  • Let’s go about this slowly (I’ll tell you why) Poet Mary Oliver does it for me. Have you read any of her work? She places her observations of the heart so delicately that the words disappear and a wistful truth remains. Here’s something from her recent compilation Felicity: Poems that makes me glad: I did think, let’s go about this slowly. This is important. more
  • A mindful review: M Train by Patti Smith Here’s another book review. I liked this one. I was totally absorbed. Patti Smith, is of course the New York punk-rock legend from the eighties who has now written multiple award-winning books. Background: I don’t know why I picked up this book. When I did a quick flick through it at the bookstore, it immediately more
  • Wanderlust: A History of Walking by Rebecca Solnit I gravitate to reads about walking. Especially those that extrapolate the connection between mindful reflection and walking. Hence today’s review of What I’ve Just Finished Reading. Background to why I read this book: Walking and reflection sustain me through my angst and anxiety. My current theory: Walking works to the same pace as reflection, thus the more
  • Each of us is responsible for everything I’ve been reading Simone De Beuvoir’s The Blood of Others. It’s a grating read. It cuts to the pain of an ethical quandary that I feel should grate at us all – are we responsible for everything? Or should we just take care of ourselves? It goes to the heart of existentialist angst – the more
  • Wondering. Could you please help me with my next cookbook? Right now – as in RIGHT NOW – I’m madly recipe developing for my next cookbook. Oh, the adventures and obsessions and kitchen disasters I’m having! Some of you have caught wind and have put in requests for me to jazz up a few of my classic recipes. So I thought, gosh…OKAY… …and got the more
  • How to Heal Autoimmune Disease: 6 clever tricks from Mickey at Autoimmune-Paleo.com For three years now I’ve been running this occasional series of posts geared at making anyone with autoimmune disease feel less like a freak. It’s been extraordinary… I’d say more than half of all readers here came to this blog for the AI information. Even more extraordinarily, a huge chunk of the rest of you more
  • I Quit Sugar on NBC’s The Today Show! Followers of my blog and social media will know I’ve been camped out in New York doing publicity for the release of the US version of I Quit Sugar. This morning I did a segment with Carson Daly on NBC’s The Today Show and made two of the most popular recipes from the book: Raspberry Ripple more